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Which clippings match 'Kinetic Art' keyword pg.1 of 3
12 MARCH 2016

Mécaniques Discursives

Mécaniques Discursives at Némo / Biennale Internationale des Arts Numériques Centquatre / Paris / F.

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2Danimated illustrationblack and whitecontraptioncut-out illustration • Frederic Penelle • kinetic art • machinerie absurde • meta-maticsplayful workprojection workswoodcut animation • Yannick Jacquet

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 JUNE 2015

PomPom Mirror: a camera-based interaction artwork

"Rozin's anthropomorphic PomPom Mirror features a synchronized array of 928 spherical faux fur puffs. Organized into a three-dimensional grid of beige and black, the sculpture is controlled by hundreds of motors that build silhouettes of viewers using computer-vision. Along its surface, figures appear as fluffy animal-like representations within the picture plane, which is made permeable by a 'push-pull' forward and backward motion of meshed 'pixels'. Ghostly traces fade and emerge, as the motorized composition hums in unified movement, seemingly alive and breathing as a body of its own."

Daniel Rozin, "PomPom Mirror", 2015, 928 faux fur pom poms, 464 motors, control electronics, video camera, custom software, microcontroller, wooden armature, 48 x 48 x 18 in / 121.9 x 121.9 x 45.7 cm

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2015aesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleanalogue correspondenceanthropomorphismartwork • beige and black • Bitforms Gallery • black and whitecamera-based interactioncomputer based interactive artcomputer visionDaniel Rozindynamic visual representationdynamically changing • fade and emerge • faux fur • fur • ghostly traces • image processing • implied tactile experience • implied texture • interactive artinteractive artworkinteractive visualisationkinetic art • mechanical mirror • microcontrollermicrosoft kinect cameramirror • moving tiles • NYCperceptual organisation • physical pixels • pom pom • PomPom Mirror (2015) • puff • push-pull • real-time motion • surface quality • synchronised array • tessellationtexturetransposing materials • unified movement • Victoria Sendra • visual appearance • visual feedback

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 DECEMBER 2012

The Art & Media Course at Tama Art University in Japan

"Art & Media Course in Information Design Department of Tama Art University manages various kinds of art forms by utilizing digital technologies and bio medias, such like interactive installations, audio & visual performances, software arts, bio arts, digital animations, and future cinemas. Through the background of recent dynamic changes of relationship between technology and human society, we aim to bring up new types of multi–skilled creators who can transcend the traditional boundaries of fine arts, science, engineering, mathematics and philosophy.The Course has established unique creative environment configured by four individual laboratories which has their own research themes."

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applied media arts • art and culture • Art and Media Course in Information Design Department • art forms • art history • art media • art theorybio artbio data • bio media art • CGIcommunication designcommunication design education • communications networks • community arts • craft and materials • creative cinema • cultural and social relations • Department of Information Design • design coursedesign managementdesign theory • digital animation • digital architecturedigital technologiesdrawing • Faculty of Fine Arts • fine art • future cinema • future phenomenology • human interfaces • IDDlab • information and society • information design • information networks • information without form • integrated media arts • interaction designinteractive artinterdisciplinary workingJapankinetic artmedia arts • media design history • media design theory • media information literacy • multi-skilled creatorsnew craftsperforming arts • social network theory • software artsound art • Tama Art University • technology and human societytime-based artvideo artvideo mediavisual literacyvisual media • write objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2012

The Bruce Lacey Experience: rich and diverse artistic production

"Bruce Lacey (born 1927) is one of Britain's great visionary artists. His lifetime pursuit of eccentric 'making and doing' has been a cathartic working–through of his experiences. This survey of a rich and diverse artistic production is a celebration of both his vibrant life (which includes working with Spike Milligan, The Beatles and Ken Russell) and his art which reveals telling links with the visual culture of the last 60 years. Co–curated by artist Jeremy Deller and art historian Professor David Alan Mellor, the exhibition charts Lacey's artistic development in a career encompassing painting, sculpture, robotised assemblages, theatrical performances and installations, as well as community arts and ritual action performances."

(Camden Arts Centre, 2012)

Fig.1 "Bruce Lacey Final H264 Widescreen 960x540" [Interview for The Bruce Lacey Experience, 7 July 2012 – 16 September 2012, Camden Arts Centre]

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2012animated modelsart exhibitionassemblageautomate • Bruce Lacey • Camden Arts Centrecircuscontraptioncontraptionscybernetic art • David Alan Mellor • deviceeccentric • electric actors • electronic artengineering • George Harrison • ingenuityJeremy Deller • Jill Bruce • Ken Russellkinetic artkinetic automaton • ley line • making and doing • making something happen • New Realism • outrageous stunts • performance career • personal psychotherapy • Peter Sellers • ritual action performance • robotroboticrobotic artrobotised assemblagesRoyal College of ArtSpike MilliganstuntThe Beatles • theatrical performances • UK • variety theatre • visionary artist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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