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01 JULY 2014

The art object does not embody a form of knowledge

"In this paper, I start from the position that the proper goal of visual arts research is visual art. An alternative position is that the art making process yields knowledge that is independent of the actual art objects produced. However, this relegates the art object to that of a by–product of the knowledge acquisition process, and, in my view, places visual art making in the service of some other discipline. Notwithstanding the fact that valuable knowledge may be acquired in this way, from my standpoint it would be undesirable for this to become the dominant mode of arts research. Therefore, from my position the most interesting proposition to explore is the claim that the art object is a form of knowledge since it locates the art object as a central and fundamental component of the knowledge acquisition process.

Nevertheless, as you will see, in this paper I argue against this proposition. I will not claim that the visual art object cannot communicate knowledge–it can. Instead, I will argue that this knowledge is typically of a superficial nature and cannot account for the deep insights that art is usually thought to endow into emotions, human nature and relationships, and our place in the World, etc. In short, I aim to demonstrate that visual art is not, nor has it ever been, primarily a form of knowledge communication; nor is it a servant of the knowledge acquisition enterprise."

(Stephen Scrivener, 2002)

Scrivener, Stephen (2002) "The art object does not embody a form of knowledge". Working Papers in Art & Design – Vol 2.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
16 MARCH 2013

Constructing Models for Practitioner-Based Research

"This paper considers differing understandings about the role and praxis of practitioner–based research for the arts. Over more than a decade the nexus between theory and practice has been a point of debate within the contemporary arts school both in Australia and overseas. This paper attempts to reveal ways of approaching this issue from within and across the disciplines. Discussions with colleagues from the arts representing fields as diverse as music, visual arts, creative writing, women's studies, dance and theatre studies indicate that the research principles explored, albeit briefly, here have resonance for each of these disciplines. Consequently, in an attempt to be broadly relevant for these diverse fields I have chosen to position the model as practitioner–based. Within this widened context I will be exploring the different ways in which studio–based practitioners and academics conceptualise the processes and characteristics of research in the arts and professional practice. However, as this is still work in progress, my exemplars will largely reflect my own field of the visual arts. Further research will enable this model to expand.

Presented is a way to conceptualise and explain what we do as studio–based researchers in the arts. In so doing I am recognising that contemporary practices in the arts reflect a meridian era of evolution, which requires us to be articulate practitioners. This includes being able to analyse and write about our practice in sophisticated ways. I see practitioner–based research and the resultant exploration of personal praxis as a way to achieve this. What I propose is that as artists we open up a larger domain by recontextualizing and reinterpreting aspects of standard mainstream research processes, looking at the resemblances, the self–resemblances and the differences between traditional and practitioner–based research methods as a logic of necessity."

(Robyn Stewart, 2001)

TEXT Vol Vol 5 No 2 October 2001 [http://www.griffith.edu.au/school/art/text/]

TAGS

2001academics • articulate practitioners • artists • arts fields • arts researchcontemporary artscontemporary practicescreative artscreative practicecreative writingdanceinvestigative praxis • logic of necessity • music practice • personal praxispractitioner-based research • practitioner-based research methods • praxisprofessional practicerecontextualisationresearch in the arts • research principles • research processesRobyn Stewartstudio practicestudio-based enquiry • studio-based practitioners • studio-based researcher • TEXT (journal) • theatre studies • theory and practicevisual artswomens studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2012

Journal for Artistic Research: a focal point for diverse artistic voices

"Introducing a high–quality journal in the field allows an ever–increasing number of artistic researchers to partake in what for the sciences and humanities are standard academic publication procedures. Given that artistic research has become a worldwide movement with many local activities, JAR can serve as a focal point, bringing together diverse voices, facilitating the discourse and thus improving the artistic research community.

In the context of JAR, artistic research is doubly defined: insofar as it is research, it enhances knowledge and understanding; because it is artistic, however, the mode of presentation is essential. This definition excludes works of art that share modes of presentation with artistic research, but do not enhance understanding. It also excludes research that is not dependant on an artistic mode of presentation. Thus, the development of epistemological as well as artistic criteria for the exposure of artistic research is a key ambition of the Journal; part of JAR's mission is to re–negotiate art's relationship to academia and the role and function of research in artistic practice. Furthermore, JAR embraces research practices across disciplines, thereby emphasising the transdisciplinary character of much artistic research.

JAR's unique presentation of artistic research as 'weaves', instead of 'pages', facilitates multi–modal exposition, thereby meeting the desire of artistic researchers to have their work displayed and documented in a manner that demonstrates a respect for modes of presentation. By introducing, together with the RC, a standard for documentation, the Journal is responding to the international artistic and academic communities, which demand high quality referencing and documentation. Moreover, the Journal meets the need of art institutions such as museums, galleries and collections for artistic research to be more easily accessible."

(Michael Schwab)

Fig.1 Deborah Harty and Phil Sawdon (2010). "humhyphenhum: Still 5".

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TAGS

academic journalart and design researchart exhibitionart galleriesart museum • artistic mode of presentation • artistic practiceartistic research • artistic research community • artistic researchersarts institutionsarts practitionerarts researcharts researcherepistemological criteriafine art collections • high quality referencing • high-quality informationJAR (journal)Journal for Artistic Researchknowledge and understanding • modes of presentation • multi-modal exposition • Research Catalogue (service) • research practices • research requirementsSociety for Artistic Research (SAR)transdisciplinary research • weaving metaphor • weaving together

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 SEPTEMBER 2011

Art & Research: an e-journal of artistic research and practice

"Art & Research is an artist–led, internationally peer–assessed open access e–journal of Research in Fine Art Practice, focused upon questions, contexts and methodologies of artistic research and practice. Art & Research aims to serve professional artists and academics, curators and critics, artistic researchers, postgraduate and doctoral research students and undergraduates, and to inform current pedagogical thought in a global context."

(Ross Birrell)

Fig.1. Dutton + Swindells, Studio Production, Ssamzie Art Space Studios, Seoul, February 2008. Courtesy of the artists.

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TAGS

academic journalacademicsapplied researchart • Art and Research (journal) • artist-led • artistic practiceartistic research • artistic research and practice • artistic researchers • arts pedagogy • arts researcharts researchercreative practicecritical theorycuratordesign research • doctoral research students • e-journalfine art practicejournalmethodological contextmethodologiespedagogical thoughtpeer-reviewedPhD • postgraduate research students • practice-basedpractice-based researchpractice-ledprofessional artistsresearch • research in fine art practice • researcherundergraduate researchvisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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