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Which clippings match 'Keyboard' keyword pg.1 of 2
24 OCTOBER 2014

What if scenario used to paper prototype DynaBook tablet interface

"In 1968 Kay created a very interesting concept – the Dynabook. He wanted to make A Personal Computer For Children Of All Ages – a thin portable computer, highly dynamic device that weighed no more than two pounds The ideas led to the development of the Xerox Alto prototype, which was originally called the interim Dynabook. It embodied all the elements of a graphical user interface, or GUI, as early as 1972. The software component of this research was Smalltalk, which went on to have a life of its own independent of the Dynabook concept."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2013

A history of colour organs and visual music

"'The early history of this art was driven by an interest in color. In the eighteenth century, a Jesuit priest, Louis Bertrand Castel, invented the first color organ. Others, including D.D. Jameson, Bainbridge Bishop, and A. Wallace Rimington, created color organs through the next century [2]."

(Maura McDonnell, 2002)

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TAGS

1730 • 1742 • 18th century • Alexander Scriabin • Alexander Wallace Rimington • amplitudeanalogue correspondence • Arnaldo Ginna • Audiovisual Environment Suite (AVES) • Bainbridge Bishop • Bruno Corra • clavecin oculaire • Clavilux • colourcolour and music • colour and sound • colour light • colour music • colour organ • colour tone • coloured light • coloured notes • compositioncorrelative analogue • D.D. Jameson • experimental instrument • experimental musical instrumentFernand Leger • Fred Callopy • Georg Telemann • GesamtkunstwerkGolan LevinHans Richter • harpsichord • Harry SmithhueinventionJames WhitneyJohn Whitneykeyboard • Lejf Marcussen • Len Lye • Leopold Survage • light organ • Louis Bertrand Castel • Luigi RussoloMan RayMarcel Duchamp • Mary Ellen Bute • Maura McDonnell • music historymusical instrumentNorman McLaren • Ocular Harpsichord • organOskar Fischinger • Paul Friedlander • piano style keyboard • pitch to hue • projected light • Prometheus (mythology) • rhythmiclight • Roy De Maistre • soundStan Brakhagesynaesthesia • synesthesia • Thomas Wilfred • timbre • tone colour • Viking Eggelingvisual music • Wallace Rimington • Walter Ruttmann • Wurlitzer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

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1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2010

The Voder: first attempt to synthesise human speech

"The Bell Telephone Laboratory's Voder* was the first attempt to synthesise human speech by breaking it down into its component sounds and then reproducing the sound patterns electronically to create speech.

That sounds simple in theory and, in fact it was. The Voder actually produced only two basic sounds: a tone generated by a radio valve to produce the vocal sounds and a hissing noise produced by a gas discharge tube to create the sibilants. These basic sounds were passed through a set of filters and an amplifier that mixed and modulated them until what came out of the loudspeaker sounded something like this.

Unfortunately, as is often the case, what was simple in theory was extremely difficult in practice. To get the machine to actually speak required an operator to manipulate a set of keys and a foot pedal to convert the hisses and tones into vowels, consonants, stops, and inflections. And the operator needed a year's practice just to master the keys."

(David H. Szondy)

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1939audioBell LabsBell Telephone Laboratoriescomputer historydevicediscoveryfuturistic machineshuman speechindustrial designinnovationkeyboardmachinemusical instrument • New York World's Fair • Pedro • pioneeringproduct designrobot • she saw me • simulationsoundspeculative designspeech synthesistechnology • Voder • voice • voice synthesis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JUNE 2006

Riday T-91 Midi Controller With Unified Keyboard

"Invented by Rick Riday, the T–91 is a midi controller that uses his patented "unified keyboard" design. This design allows for identical fingering patterns for all 12 scales (12 major scales, 12 minor, 12 blues, etc.) The instrument in the photo is one of a handful he has built. The project is "on hold" at this time, but units will be available sometime in the future."

(John Pascuzz, Oddmusic.com)

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deviceindustrial designkeyboardMIDI • midi controller • musical instrumentproduct design • Rick Riday • Riday • sound • T-91 • unified keyboard
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