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Which clippings match 'Artworks' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 DECEMBER 2015

What is art for?

"Alain de Botton gives his top five reasons why art is such a vital force for humanity. Are we wrong to like pretty pictures? Why is some art painful to look at? Can art heal your feelings of urban alienation? Relax, watch and find out."

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TAGS

Alain de Botton • animated guide • animated presentationartart and designart appreciationart galleryartworkscelebrity culturecontemporary artcorrectionfine art • hopefulness • human condition • meaning of art • pretty things • visual artwork of artyellow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 OCTOBER 2014

Arnold Berleant: engagement as the participatory alternative to the aesthetic concept of disinterestedness

"Berleant (1991) proposes the explanatory concept of engagement as the participatory alternative to the aesthetic concept of disinterestedness and illustrates throughout his work the essentially participatory nature of appreciating art, nature, and the human built environment. Some forms of participation are overt in nature and require people to physically interact with the artwork – e.g. an artwork may require people to physically interaction in order to experience the artwork. Yet, Berleant argues, even more 'traditional' artworks require participatory engagement in that they are realized in the reciprocal relation between person and artwork. When we are immersed in aesthetic appreciation of an artwork, e.g. a painting, it is a process of participatory engagement in which we may imaginatively enter and explore the space of the painting. Moreover, engagement, according to Berleant, unfolds within a complex field of forces – the aesthetic field - that shape peoples experience Berleant (1970)"

(Christian Dindler and Peter Dalsgaard, 2009, p.2-3)

Berleant, A. (1991). 'Art and Engagement', Temple University Press, Philadelphia.
Berleant, A. (1970). 'The Aesthetic Field', CC Thomas, Springfield, Ill.

Dindler, C. and P. Dalsgaard (2009). "Peepholes as Means of Engagement in Interaction Design". Nordes 2009 - Engaging Artifacts. Oslo, Norge, Nordes – Nordic Design Research.

TAGS

2009 • aesthetic appreciation • aesthetic disinterestedness • aesthetic encounters • aesthetic engagement • aesthetic enquiry • aesthetic field • aesthetic of disinterestedness • aesthetic perception • aestheticsArnold Berleantart appreciationart objectartworks • Christian Dindler • Classical arts • contemporary artexplanatory concept of engagementimmersive experience • Nordic Design Research • participatory engagement • Peter Dalsgaard • physical interaction • traditional aesthetics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2013

The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

"The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is the country's [USA] leading museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists for local, national and international audiences. MoCNA is a venue for exhibitions of artists who merit, local, national and international recognition. The Museum belongs at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk–taking in its exhibitions and programs."

(MoCNA)

Richard Glazer–Danay, Jan, 2012, "Shake, Rattle & Roll", Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, [http://www.iaia.edu/museum/exhibition/shake–rattle–roll/].

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1962 • American Indian • art museumartworkscontemporary art • contemporary Native artists • cultural appropriation • cultural discourse • cultural identitycultural interpretations • cultural programme • exhibiting artists • folk museumfostering discourse • IAIA • indigenous artIndigenous people • Institute of American Indian Arts • international audiences • MoCNA • museummuseum of contemporary culture • Museum of Contemporary Native Arts • National Collection of Contemporary Native Art • national cultural identitiesNative Americans • Native art • Native artists • New Mexico • North America • progressive work • sacred • Santa Fe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2012

VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study: Case Study for the pragmatic direct digital capture of artworks from the Surrey Institute of Art and Design

"The VADS Fine Art Project aims to bring together, through a distributed digitisation model, artworks from across Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) that can serve to exemplify the history and achievement of fine art education and practice in this country since its inception in the 1850s.

In the initial stages of the project, a survey was sent out to all the Higher Education Institutions in the UK that taught fine art, in order to elicit whether or not student and staff work had been kept or documented. From this survey it was found that many colleges failed or had ceased to collect artworks due to the cost implications of purchasing, storing and insuring the works, leading to the output of many art colleges remaining undocumented.

As the Fine Art Project progressed, protocols for the digital capture, documentation and copyright clearance of work were established. These were then used to collect works from around the country to be included in the National Fine Art Education Digital Collection. However, given their inherent useable and easily applicable nature, it was thought the same protocols could be just as useful to digitally capture, document and rights–clear works within HEIs as and when they were being produced. This would make it far easier and affordable for colleges to capture and maintain collections of their present and past work, as well as offering additional benefits such as making them widely available on the Internet or for other publishing requirements."

(Ed Bremner, 1 September 2003 [last modified: 28th March 2006], Institute for Learning and Research Technology)

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TAGS

1850s2003AHDS Visual Artsartworkartworks • capture and maintain collections • case study • collect works • collecting artworks • collectioncopyright clearance • cost implications • digital capture • digitally capture • digitisation • direct digital capture • distributed digitisation model • documentation • documented • fine art • fine art education • fine art practice • Fine Art Project • HEI • Higher Education Institutes • higher education institutions • history and achievement • image management system • insuring artworks • Internetknowledge management • National Fine Art Education Digital Collection • pilot project • pilot study • present and past work • protocol • publishing requirements • purchasing artworks • raw filerepository • SIAD • storing artworks • student and staff work • Surrey Institute of Art and Design • surveyUKVADS • VADS Fine Art Project • VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

2 Dimen­sional Life of Her

"2 Dimen­sional Life of Her is a visual per­for­mance made of draw­ing, ani­ma­tion, pup­petry, pro­jec­tion and paper.

Set in an artist's stu­dio, a richly imag­ined par­al­lel world is awoken where every­thing that was thought to be still or flat becomes some­thing else. Her draw­ings repro­duce them­selves, drift between sur­faces and move in and out of three dimen­sions. She loses con­trol of her cre­ations and absolutely any­thing becomes possible..."

(Fleur Elise Noble)

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TAGS

2 Dimen­sional Life of Her • 2D2D representationsartworksAustraliacollagedrawing • Fleur Elise Noble • paperpapercuttingperformance • performative possibilities of drawing • projectionpuppetryspeculative designtableau vivanttheatre • theatre experiences • theatre spaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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