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Which clippings match 'Time As Space' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 DECEMBER 2014

Daniel Crooks: digital divisionism and image transposition

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TAGS

ACMI • ACMI (Australian Centre for the Moving Image) • Anna Schwartz Gallery • Aotearoa New Zealand • Auckland Institute of Technology • Brothers Quay • chronophotography • computational imaging • Daniel Crooksdivisionism • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco • flatbed scanner • hand-held scanner • Hastings • image stretchingJan Svankmajermotion studiesNew Zealand artistphotocopy • post camera imaging • scanningslit-scan • spatial distortion • tai chi • time as spacetime-motion studiestrain • transposition • Victorian College of the Artsvideo and digital artvideo artistvisual spectacleZbigniew Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 SEPTEMBER 2011

The Metaphor of Time as Space

"Many students of language are astounded by the fact that there are languages which lack tense. This confusion results from the fact that they do not realize that time is a semantic construct and tense is a linguistic one. All languages have ways of speaking about time, a semantic construct. Not all languages have linguistic markers of time, tense. Languages that lack tense, use time words to signal events that take place in the past, present, or future. With the passage of time, these time words become attached to verbs and the resulting conflation is known as tense. English has only two tenses: the present and the past. The future occurs as a time construct, but not as a linguistic one. In order to talk about the future in English, one must use a construction that employs the model will."

(Robert N. St. Clair, University of Louisville)

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cultural construct • futurelanguagelanguages • linguistic construct • linguistic marker • metaphororderingpassage of timepastpresentsemantic construct • signal events • social construction of knowledgespace • tense • timetime as space • time words • transition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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