Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Quentin Tarantino' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 JUNE 2015

Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel (2011)

1
2

3

4

TAGS

2011 • Alex Stapleton • Allan Arkush • Anders Bramsen • b-moviebad taste • Bjarni Gautur • Bob Burns • Brett Ratner • Bruce Dern • Catherine Hardwicke • Clint Howard • Cormans World (2011) • Darren Lynn Bousman • David Carradine • David Crosby • Dick Miller • documentary • Eli Roth • Eric Balfour • exploitation films • Frances Doel • Francis Ford Coppola • Gale Hurd • Gary Tunnicliffe • Gene Corman • George Hickenlooper • Gregory Locklear • grindhouse • horror film genre • independent film • independent film producer • influential producer • Irvin Kershner • Izabela Frank • Jack NicholsonJames CameronJames Wan • Jeff Frey • Jim Wynorski • Joe Dante • John Sayles • Jonathan Demme • Jonathan Haze • Julie Corman • Kevin O Neill • life and career • Lloyd Kaufman • low-budget film • Marky Ramone • Martin Scorsese • Mary Woronov • Mickey Barold • Monte Hellman • Nancy Sinatra • Oliver Hecks • Pam Grier • Patrick Simpson • Paul Anderson • Paul Bartel • Penelope Spheeris • Peter Bogdanovich • Peter Fonda • Philip Owens • Polly Platt • Quentin TarantinoRichard Matheson • Robert De Niro • Roger Corman • Ron Howard • Sally Kirkland • sensationalismsexploitation • Stone Douglass • teensploitation • Timur Bekmambetov • Tom Sherak • Traci Lords • untasteful • Victor Livingston • William Shatner • writer-director-producer • young talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 DECEMBER 2012

North Korean 'Propaganda' is the real viral hit of 2012

"Propaganda 2012 is a 95–minute video that presents itself as a North Korean educational video intending to inform the citizens of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea about the dangers of Western propaganda. The video's uploader, known as 'Sabine', reiterates a statement she gave to the Federal Police regarding the movie's origins. She explains how the film was given to her by people claiming to be North Korean defectors whilst she was visiting Seoul. ...

Although the origins of Propaganda 2012 are contentious, its power lies in the fact that much of its content attempts to avoid invented history. Considering the media buzzwords associated with the alleged country of origin, Propaganda 2012 turns a mirror onto the Western world and seeks to criticise its entire history and culture–from the genocide and imperialism of its past, to the interventionism and consumerism of the modern era. The movie's overall attitude seems to express an intention to educate, shock and caution its audience into realising that people in the West are governed by a super–rich ruling class (The one per cent), who do not offer them true democracy; but instead seek to invade and assimilate as many countries as possible, whilst distracting their population with a smokescreen of consumerism, celebrity, and reality television. This message is spread across the video's 17 chapters, which each attempt to focus on specific examples of Western indoctrination and oppression. The film is regularly punctuated by commentary from an anonymous North Korean professor, and quotes from Western thinkers such as Noam Chomsky and Richard Dawkins. ...

Propaganda 2012 is certainly a film where the audience takes from it what they bring to it, and a variety of emotions can be induced upon viewing. Laughter, cynicism, outrage, contemplation and reflection would all be adequate responses to the video's tough, and often graphic, portrayal of the complex world in which we are living. Yet perhaps the most important thing to remember when watching the film is that the video is available to view uncensored, on a largely unregulated world wide web, and merely represents an extreme end of the vast spectrum of free expression. Therefore, during this festive end to an austere year, enjoy Propaganda 2012 as an interesting and beguiling alternative voice that cries loudly against the dangers of religious consumerism, and reminds us to remain humble and reflect on those less fortunate than ourselves."

(Kieran Turner–Dave, 17 December 2012, Independent Arts Blogs)

1

TAGS

20129/11anti-capitalism • brainwashing • capitalismCentury of the Selfcommunismconspiracy theoriesconsumer cultureconsumer desireconsumerism • counter-terrorism • criticismcult of celebritycultural imperialismcultural implicationsdemocracydistractiondocumentary • DPRK • emotive manipulation • false flag • fear • fear of communism • fear of terrorism • free expression • Gangnam Style • genocidehalf-baked ideashistory and culture • hysterics • imperialism • indoctrination • interventionism • invented history • Just Do It • Korea • life in the West • likes • manufacturing consent • moralitynarcissismnationalism • neo-imperialist • Noam ChomskyNorth KoreaoppressionOprah WinfreyParis Hiltonpatriotismpolitical educationpropagandaPropaganda (2012)public relationsQuentin Tarantinoreality televisionreligion • religious consumerism • Richard Dawkins • Sabine (pseudonym) • salvation • September 11 2001shockingsmokescreensocialist realismSociety of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)South Koreaspectacle • Survivor (tv series) • terrorism • the one per cent • trust • Tyra Banks • unconscious desireswatching television

CONTRIBUTOR

David Reid
25 JUNE 2012

Annual international film festival and conference: Cine-Excess VI

"Cine–Excess VI was entitled 'Transglobal Excess: The Art and Atrocity of Cult Adaptation' and took place at the Odeon Covent Garden and the Italian Cultural Institute, London between the 24–26th May 2012. The event focused on global adaptations of cult narratives, genres, themes and icons across a broad range of media and fiction formats. From pulp novels into pulp horror films and recent big budget blockbuster remakes of marginal midnight movies, to nationally defined interpretations of the pre–established extreme, the cult image remains a fascinating index of adaptation, whose wide array of remakes, renditions and realisations frequently reveals fascinating issues of nation and narrative, as well cultural, regional and historical distinction."

1

TAGS

1970s2012adaptationblockbuster • Cine-Excess (festival) • Cine-Excess (journal) • conferenceCovent Garden • cult adaptation • cult film • cult image • cult movie • cult narratives • Enzo Castellari • fiction film • fiction formats • film adaptation • film distributors • film exhibitors • film festival • film festival and conference • film genrefilmmakers • Frazer Lee • horror scripts • international film festivalItalian cinema • Italian Cultural Institute • Kim Henkel • Mary Wood • midnight movienarrative fictionpulp fiction • pulp horror films • pulp novel • Quentin Tarantino • realisations • remakes • renditions • script to scream • Sergio Martino • themes • Time Out (magazine) • Tom Huddleston • transglobalUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2011

Everybody vs. Everybody: Duels, Shootouts, and Mexican Standoffs

A mash–up of stand–offs, shoot–outs, and showdowns.

1

TAGS

A Better Tomorrow (film) • A Fistful of Dollarsaction movie • Akira Kurosawa • Bullet in the Head (film) • character movement • Django (film) • duel • Exiled (film) • figures in space • Hard Boiled (film) • Hong Kong • John Woo • Johnnie To • mash-up • Mexican standoff • Once Upon a Time in the West (film) • PTU (film) • Pulp Fiction (film) • Quentin TarantinoReservoir Dogs (1992) • sequence archetype • Sergio Corbucci • Sergio LeoneSeven Samurai (1954)shootoutspaghetti western • stalemate • The Good the Bad and the Ugly (film) • The Killer (film)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2008

Sátántangó: surprise non-linearity

"Also interesting from the perspective of temporality, along with Tarr's staggeringly long takes, is the film's narrative structure, which is what I call 'surprise non–linearity.' As the film begins we watch events that are occurring in a forward, linear temporality (with minor ellipsis' occurring in between certain shots). At a certain point we experience a sense of deja vu which shakes this temporal foundation: a scene which we have already scene repeats but from a different spatial and narrational point of view. In this case the moment occurs, as noted in the beginning, from the position of the doctor's desk. In the film's second scene we see a man who has slept with a married woman sneak out of the house when the husband returns home. The camera later cuts outside to an image of the adulterer hiding behind the corner of a house out of view of the husband, who is in the middle background of the shot looking out into the expanse. Forty or so minutes into the film we see this same mise en scene of the man hiding from the husband but from the doctor's point of view, as he writes the event down in his notebook. This stuttering temporality occurs on several occasions. Offscreen contributor Randolph Jordan tells me that when he saw Béla Tarr present this film in Vancouver the director used the tango to explain the film's temporal structure: two steps forward, one step back. One can also see the temporal structure as an echo of the film's metaphorical use of the spider. Several of the film's intertitles make reference to the spider, and the spider makes a physical appearance at the end of the long pub dance scene. In a long lateral tracking shot of the drunken revelers a spider can be briefly scene in the foreground of a shot spinning a web between two glasses. The voice–over tells us that the spider will be spinning its web around the objects, and around the people in the pub, echoing of course the messiah's trap. The spiral–like shape of the spider web acts as an apt parallel to the film's narrative temporality. This type of 'surprise non–linearity' has become quite common in recent years. A list of films which use such a structure, to varying degrees and ends, includes Korean director Hong Sang–Joo's The Power of Kangwon Province/Kangwondo Eui Him (1998) and Virgin Stripped Bare by her Naked Bachelors (2000), Mystery Train (jim Jarmusch, 1989), Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1995), Heaven (Scott Reynold, 1998), Before the Rain (Milcho Manchevski, 1994), and A Moment of Innocence (Mohsen Makhmalbaf, 1996)."

Totaro, 2002)

1

TAGS

black and whitechronologycinemacommunity • deja vu • designfarmfilmfilm directorfilmmakerHungarianHungary • interlink • Jim Jarmusch • Krasznahorkai • lingering • long takes • meditative pace • Messiah • metaphor • Milcho Manchevski • mise-en-scene • Mohsen Makhmalbaf • narrativenon-linearQuentin Tarantino • Satantango • Scott Reynoldsspiderstructure • surprise non-linearity • tango • Tarr • temporal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.