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02 JULY 2012

Art directory of gallery exhibitions & contemporary visual fine artists

"re–title.com, an artist initiative founded in London in 2005, is the information resource for emerging and professional contemporary art, providing directory and publicity services for internationally focused artists and galleries.

...used daily by thousands of artists, curators, critics, gallerists, writers, media professionals, collectors and enthusiasts for research and current information."

(Re–title.com)

Fig.1 Katharina Sieverding, Weltlinie, 1999, A/D/A Process, Acryl, Stahl, 2teilig; je 190 x 125 cm, Image © Katharina Sieverding, Courtesy Galerie Christian Lethert, Koln [http://www.re–title.com/artists/Katharina–Sieverding.asp].

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TAGS

2005artart collectorsart criticsart curator • artist initiative • artists • artists directory • arts and culturearts community • arts writer • contemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary visual artscreative practicecreative practice directorycreative practitionercreative practitionerscurator • current information • directory of creative practice • emerging artistic practices • emerging contemporary art • enthusiastsexhibitionfine art • fine artists • gallerists • information resource • internationally focused artists • internationally focused galleries • Katharina Sieverding • media professionals • online art directory • professional contemporary art • publicity services • Re-title.com • visual art academicsvisual art professionalsvisual artsvisual arts organisationsvisual arts research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2012

Australian cultural policy: a model for the UK

"Last November I visited Australia and the arts community was buzzing with talk about the country's proposed new cultural policy. So I took a look at the discussion document and I turned green with envy – why can't we have one of these in the UK?

In Britain we've never been good at framing a coherent approach to culture. Back in 1996 a senior civil servant at the Department for National Heritage told the Sunday Times: 'It is not part of our culture to think in terms of a cultural policy,' and not much has changed.

The Australian example shows what can be done. It's a remarkable and mercifully brief document that has many virtues.

First, it sets out the beliefs on which any serious cultural policy must be founded: 'The arts and creative industries are fundamental to Australia's identity as a society and nation, and increasingly to our success as a national economy.' It adds that 'the policy will be based on an understanding that a creative nation produces a more inclusive society and a more expressive and confident citizenry.'

Everything that follows in the document is built on this bedrock of ideology. Without such clear and transparent beliefs, and the commitment that flows from them, policies are doomed to endless wrangling about measurement and evidence.

But the document does acknowledge evidence where it exists, and uses it wisely. For example: 'Research shows that arts education encourages academic achievement and improves students' self–esteem, leading to more positive engagement with school and the broader community and higher school retention rates' – therefore 'the new national curriculum will ensure that young Australians have access to learning in the creative arts.'

But in the UK we have to suffer the non–evidence based approach of abolishing what went before just because the other lot invented it.

The next virtue is that the proposed policy not only encompasses the arts, heritage and creative industries, but extends into other areas like education and infrastructure. Culture is deemed relevant to every department of government, from the role that it plays in international relations (British Foreign and Commonwealth Office) to its economic importance (HM Treasury), from its impact on the need to build airports for cultural tourists (Department for Communities and Local Goverment) to cultural scholarship in Higher Education (Department for Education).

That relevance is a two–way street: for example, the cultural uses of high speed broadband affect hard infrastructural requirements, while the existence of the hardware creates cultural opportunities."

(John Holden, Monday 6 February 2012)

Fig.1 Australia's 1988 Bicentennial $10 Note.

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TAGS

academic achievementaccess to learningarts • arts and creative industries • arts communityarts educationarts policyAustralia • Australian example • beliefs • British Foreign and Commonwealth Office • coherent approach • confident citizenry • creative artscreative industriesCreative Nationcultural identity • cultural opportunities • cultural policy • cultural scholarship • cultural tourism • cultural uses • Department for Communities and Local Goverment • Department for Education • Department for National Heritage • evidence based policy • expressive citizenry • heritage • high speed broadband • higher education • HM Treasury • ideology • inclusive society • infrastructural requirements • measurement and evidence • national curriculumnational economy • positive engagement • self-esteem • society and nation • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2011

Ideas Expo: building a new Creative Christchurch through precincts

"Fifteen urban designers, business leaders, arts and tourism representatives, geo–tech experts, architects, environmentalists, students and a Central City resident for 57 years will share their ideas for Christchurch's Central City in the Speakers' Corner at this weekend's (14 and 15 May) community expo."

(Rebuild Christchurch, 14 and 15 May 2011)

[It's not very often that whole cities are re–designed as is the case with Christchurch in Aotearoa New Zealand. While earthquakes continue to shake the region Christchurch residents are making plans for the future. The Christchurch City Council invited key stakeholders to present their perspectives as part of their public consultation process. In doing so Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) Dean Dr. Jane Gregg and Creative Industries Faculty Stakeholder Manager Martin Trusttum explain their vision for a "Creative Christchurch" based on the concept of precincts.]

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TAGS

2011Aotearoa New Zealandarchitectsarts community • arts representatives • buildingCBD • central city • ChristchurchChristchurch City Council • Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology • citycivic engagement • community expo • constructionCPIT • Creative Christchurch • creative economycreative industriescultural precinctdemocratic participationearthquakeidealisminfrastructureinhabitationinnovation • interconnected spaces • Jane Gregg • knowledge-based economylandscape futuresMartin Trusttumnodeparticipation • precinct • redevelopment • reterritorialisationsettlementSouth Islandtabula rasatheme parktransformation • urban designers • urban planning

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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