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Which clippings match 'Jew' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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TAGS

1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2009

Barack Obama: our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness

"For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non–believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2009

The only viable plan for long-term security in Israel is for it to gain acceptance from all it's neighbours

"Israel cannot afford a military defeat for fear of disappearing from the map, yet history has proven that every military victory has always left Israel in a weaker political position than before because of the emergence of radical groups. I do not underestimate the difficulty of the decisions the Israeli government must make every day, nor do I underestimate the importance of Israel's security. Nevertheless, I stand behind my conviction that the only truly viable plan for long–term security in Israel is to gain the acceptance of all of our neighbours."

(Daniel Barenboim)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2007

Status Quo solution for Jerusalem

"Sharing sovereignty of political territory is not practiced often, yet it seems to be the only reasonable solution for the complex issue of Jerusalem. Using the holy places of Jerusalem as a model, the author shows how sharing sacred space, albeit on a very small scale, can be done peacefully. For more than a century Greeks, Latins, Armenians, and Copts have shared the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in an interlocking system of scattered sovereignty. Such a system also could work between Israelis and Palestinians as they share the sacred space of Jerusalem.
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If Israel continues to maintain control over all the land of Israel/Palestine, of course, then there is no need to discuss sharing Jerusalem. But in anticipation of the day when there most likely will be some form of Palestinian entity in existence side–by–side with Israel, and knowing that both peoples claim the city as holy and as their capital, then somehow the two nations have to agree on how to share the city. Ideally, the Israelis and Palestinians should sit down and demarcate control, because they are the ones who best know the facts on the ground. Given the imbalance of power between the two parties, however, perhaps the United Nations or the United States could play the role of arbitrator, like the Ottomans did in the past."
(Chad F. Emmett)

Chad F. Emmett (1997). 'The Status Quo Solution for Jerusalem.' Journal of Palestine Studies 26(2).

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TAGS

Al-Aqsa Mosque • autonomy • Church of the Holy Sepulchre • civil rights • Emmett • Haram esh-Sharif • holy • interlocking • IsraelJerusalemJewmosaicMuslimnationOttoman Empire • Ottomans • PalestinianpeacesacredshareSolomonsovereigntytempleterritorytoleranceUnited Nationsviolence
04 JUNE 2006

Growing up with the legacy of the Jewish Holocaust: audio stories of Jewish children

The Jewish Museum in Berlin makes good use of audiovisual technologies to engage its visitors. One of these involves the presentation of audio stories of Jewish children growing up with the legacy of the Jewish Holocaust. The stories are accessed through individual sets of headphones that are spread around a large (AstroTurf–like covered) green room. Each of the children's stories has an accompanying light–box that displays personal information about their subject and a seating area for visitors to sit in while they listen to the stories. The arrangement is both visually dramatic through the function of the light–boxes as visual accents and calming through the general ambience of the exhibition space. The use and arrangement of audiovisual technologies in this way helps to promote visitor engagement with both the individual exhibition displays and more generally with the exhibition experience.

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TAGS

AstroTurf • audio storiesaudiovisualBerlinexhibitionGermanyJewJewish Holocaust • Jewish Museum Berlin • light-boxmuseumoral historiesSimon Perkins
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