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Which clippings match 'Jazz' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Rap & Hip-Hop was born in 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue

"Hip-hop music is generally considered to have been pioneered in New York's South Bronx in 1973 by Jamaican-born Kool DJ Herc. At a Halloween dance party thrown by his younger sister, Herc used an innovative turntable technique to stretch a song's drum break by playing the break portion of two identical records consecutively. The popularity of the extended break lent its name to 'breakdancing'--a style specific to hip-hop culture, which was facilitated by extended drumbreaks played by DJs at New York dance parties. By the mid-1970s, New York's hip-hop scene was dominated by seminal turntablists DJ Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Herc. The rappers of Sugarhill Gang produced hip-hop's first commercially successful hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' in 1979'.

Rap itself--the rhymes spoken over hip-hop music--began as a commentary on the ability--or 'skillz'--of a particular DJ while that DJ was playing records at a hip-hop event. MCs, the forerunners of today's rap artists, introduced DJs and their songs and often recognized the presence of friends in the audience at hip-hop performances. Their role was carved out by popular African-American radio disc jockeys in New York during the latel96Os, who introduced songs and artists with spontaneous rhymes. The innovation of MCs caught the attention of hip-hop fans. Their rhymes lapped over from the transition period between the end of one song and the introduction of the next to the songs themselves. Their commentaries moved solely from a DJ's skillz to their own personal experiences and stories. The role of MCs in performances rose steadily, and they began to be recognized as artists in their own right [2].

The local popularity of the rhythmic music served by DJs at dance parties and clubs, combined with an increase in 'b-boys'--breakdancers--and graffiti artists and the growing importance of MCs, created a distinctive culture known as hip-hop. For the most part, hip-hop culture was defined and embraced by young, urban, working-class African-Americans. Hip-hop music originated from a combination of traditionally African-American forms of music--including jazz, soul, gospel, and reggae. It was created by working-class African-Americans, who, like Herc, took advantage of available tools--vinyl records and turntables--to invent a new form of music that both expressed and shaped the culture of black New York City youth in the 1970s."

(Becky Blanchard, 1999)

2). Information on MCs drawn from the University of Maryland's "Mcing: The Past" and "MCing: The Present" in "A Brief History of Hip-Hop Culture"

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1970s1973African AmericanAfrika Bambaataaappropriation • b-boys • b-girls • Becky Blanchard • black culture • block party • break dancing • breakbeat • breakdance • breakdancing • Cindy Campbell • civil rights movement • Clive Campbell • cultural expression • dance party • DJ • DJ Grandmaster Flash • DJing • extended break • gospel • graffiti art • graffiti artists • Grandmaster Flash • hip-hophip-hop backbeat • hip-hop culture • hip-hop music • hip-hop performance • hip-hop scene • jazz • Kool DJ Herc • l960s • MC • MCing • music history • musical form • New York City • radio disc jockey • rap • rap artist • rap music • rapperreggae • rhyme • rhythmic music • Sedgwick Avenue • skillz • soul • South Bronx • spoken word • Sugarhill Gang • turntable • turntable technique • turntablist • vinyl record • West Bronx • working classworking class cultureyouth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2014

Interview with the First Lady of Bass: Carol Kaye

"Carol Kaye: you may not recognize her name but chances are you're familiar with her work. Now 79, the lady has laid down some deeply iconic bass tracks in a career spanning 55 years and something in the neighborhood of 10,000 recording sessions."

(Ayun Halliday, 28 April 2014, Open Culture)

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Barbra Streisand • bass guitaristbass player • Beach Boys • bebop • Bill Pitman • Bob West • Brian Wilson • Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid • Capitol Records • Carol Kaye • Charles Manson • chordal tones • chromatic scale • Chuck Britz • digital collaboration • Earl Palmer • electric bass • female bass guitarist • female bass player • Fender • Frank Sinatra • Gene Page • Glen Campbell • Hal Blaine • Hawaii 5-0 • Hogans Heroes • In Cold Blood • In The Heat Of The Night • interview • Ironside • Jack Nitzsche • jazz • jazz patterns • Joe Cocker • Los Angeles • Lou Rawls • M.A.S.H. • Mission ImpossibleMotownmusic piracymusician • Phil Spector • playing musicQuincy Jones • Ray Charles • Sam Cooke • session musician • Simon and Garfunkel • Sonny and Cher • Sonny Bono • The Addams Family • The Beach Boys • The Brady Bunch • The Clique • The Long Goodbye • The Monkees • The Pawnbroker • The Streets of San Francisco • The Supremes • Thomas Crown Affair (1968) • Tommy Tedesco • women in music

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2011

Far better than 3-D: animated GIFs that savour a passing moment

"You know how people sometimes say that jazz is the only truly American art form? Animated GIFs are like the jazz of the internet: they could only exist, and be created and appreciated, online. That said, PopTart Cat is not exactly on par with Thelonious Monk. But photographer Jamie Beck and motion graphics artist Kevin Burg may have finally found a way to elevate the animated GIF to a level approaching fine art, with their 'cinemagraphs' –– elegant, subtly animated creations that are 'something more than a photo but less than a video.' ...

The pair was inspired to create these cinemagraphs while preparing to cover Fashion Week this past February: 'We wanted to tell more of a story than a single still frame photograph but didn't want the high maintenance aspect of a video,' they told Co.Design via email."

(John Pavlus, Co.Design)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2005

Urban Wallpaper: Improvised Juxtapositions

Marshall Soules (Malaspina University–College)
Urban Wallpaper charts the "psychogeographical contours" of selected cities by documenting the improvised juxtapositions––and deconstruction––of cultural announcements. Each image is a narrative of passing events requiring patient translation. Each image is a collective improvisation reminding us that the construction of culture derives from a series of contrapuntal actions partly ruled by chance within a matrix of protocols, and partly created by individual self–assertion.

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contour • contrapuntal • culturederiveimprovisationjazzjuxtapositionlayer • psychogeographical • Soules • Urban Wallpaper
02 JULY 2004

The Awakening: Ahmad Jamal's innovative West Coast jazz album

"The music on this CD has been reissued many times, most recently in 1997. By 1970, pianist Ahmad Jamal's style had changed a bit since the 1950s, becoming denser and more adventurous while still retaining his musical identity. With bassist Jamil Nasser (whose doubletiming lines are sometimes furious) and drummer Frank Gant, Jamal performs two originals (playing over a vamp on 'Patterns'), the obscure 'I Love Music' and four jazz standards. Intriguing performances showing that Ahmad Jamal was continuing to evolve."

(Scott Yanow via http://allmusic.com/album/r141386)

Ahmad Jamal (piano) Jamil Nasser (bass) Frank Gant (drums) Plaza Sound Studios, NYC, February 2 & 3, 1970, 'The Awakening' album, Impulse Records. Tracks: 1). 'The Awakening', 2). 'I Love Music', 3). 'Patterns', 4). 'Dolphin Dance', 5). 'You're My Everything', 6). 'Stolen Moments', 7). 'Wave'

1). 'Stolen Moments'

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1970 • Antonio Carlos Jobim • authorship • bossa nova • CDcompositioncreative practice • Frank Gant • Herbie Hancock • Impulse Records • interpretation • Jamil Nasser • jazzjazz pianist • jazz standards • keyboardmusicmusical identitymusician • Oliver Nelson • patternperformancepianore-publish • Stolen Moments • The Awakening • treatmenttrioversion • West Coast jazz

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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