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Which clippings match 'Characters' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 NOVEMBER 2012

Psychical Distance: characters and situations in drama are unreal

"One of the best known examples is to be found in our attitude towards the events and characters of the drama; they appeal to us like persons and incidents of normal experience, except that that side of their appeal, which would usually affect us in a directly personal manner, is held in abeyance. This difference, so well known as to be almost trivial, is generally explained by reference to the knowledge that the characters and situations are 'unreal,' imaginary. In this sense Witasek, oeprating with Meinong's theory of Annahem, has described the emotions involved in witnessing a drama as Scheingefuhle, a term which has so frequently been misunderstood in discussions of his theories. But, as a matter of fact, the 'assumption' upon which the imaginative emotional reaction is based is not necessarily the condition, but often the consequence, of distance; that is to say, the converse of the reason usually stated would then be true: viz. That distance, by changing our relation to the characters, renders them seemingly fictitious, not that the fictitiousness of the characters alters our feelings toward them. It is, of course, to be granted that the actual and admitted unreality of the dramatic action reinforces the effect of Distance. But surely the proverbial unsophisticated yokel whose chivalrous interference in the play on behalf of the hapless heroine can only be prevented by impressing upon him that 'they are only pretending,' is not the ideal type of theatrical audience. The proof of the seeming paradox that it is Distance which primarily gives to dramatic action the appearance of unreliability and not vice versa, is the observation that the same filtration of our sentiments and the same seeming 'unreality' of actual men and things occur, when at times, by a sudden change of inward perspective, we are overcome by the feeling that 'all the world's a stage.'"

(Edward Bullough, 1912)

Edward Bullough (1912). "Psychical Distance" British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 5, pp. 87–117 (excerpt cited by Julie Van Camp, 22 November 2006).

Fig.1 Patricia Piccinini/Drome Pty Ltd. (2010) [http://leecasey.carbonmade.com/projects/2594595#9]

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TAGS

1912aesthetics • Alexius Meinong • all the worlds a stage • Annahem • appeal • appearance of unreliability • audiencebelievabilitybreaking the fourth wallchanging our relationcharactersdirect experience • distance • distanced viewpointdrama • dramatic action • dramatic space • Edward Bullough • emotionemotional immersionemotional involvementempathyfeelings • fictitious • fictitiousnessheld in abeyanceimaginary • imaginative emotional reaction • normal experience • only pretending • our sentiments • pathospersonalpropinquitypsychical distancepsychological closeness • psychological proximity • Scheingefuhle • Stephan Witasek • suspension of disbelief • theatrical audience • unreal • unreal characters • unreal situations • unreality • verisimilitude • witnessing • yoke

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

Hollyoaks: visually dramatic wedding trailer

"Hollyoaks released its memorable 'Black Wedding' promo as build–up to the upcoming marriage of Mercedes McQueen (Jennifer Metcalfe) and Riley Costello (Rob Norbury). Set to the music of Billy Idol's sinister 'White Wedding,' this highly–stylized, artistic trailer was meant to convey the dark, foreboding mood surrounding the event, which was rife with lies, deceit, and even blackmail. Would the very pregnant Mercedes finally cave and confess to Riley that she'd had an affair with his own father, Carl (Paul Opacic), who was serving as his son's best man – or – would she go through with the ceremony ever–fearful that one of the villagers who knew her secret might stand up and tell all? The 45–second video, which was said to have taken 15 hours to film, was directed by Alex Boutell, photographed by Chris Sabogal. and edited by Kel McKeown (host of this1080p HD version at YouTube). And yes, according to Metcalfe, that really was black paint they put in her eye for the final teardrop shot – having joked at the time that it nearly 'killed' her!""

(Kevin Mulcahy Jr., 3 October 2014, We Love Soaps)

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2011advert • big event • Billy Idol • Channel 4characterscinematographydarkE4 • episode • gothic • Hollyoaks • Jennifer Metcalfe • Mercedes Fisher • Mercedes McQueen • monochromatic • moody • play it straight • promo • Riley Costello • Rob Norbury • soap opera • spoiler • trailervisual dramavisually dramaticweddingwedding day • wedding trailer • white wedding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 OCTOBER 2011

Mise-en-scene, Montage, and the Unique Language of Film

"Mise–en–scène refers to the visual design of a film. A narrative film's visual elements can include lighting, set décor, costume design, props, blocking, spatial relationships, scene composition – Mise–en–scène is how these visual elements work together to tell the story. Every visual element designed for narrative film is considered mise–en–scène. Even non–narrative films, such as documentaries, can be said to have a certain degree of mise–en–scène. This arrangement and design expresses aspects of the characters, themes, and story that are necessarily in dialogue."

(Michael McVey, Skiffleboom.com)

Fig.1 James McTeigue (2006). "V for Vendetta"

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TAGS

ocking • characterscostume designdecor • designed • dialoguefilm • film grammar • film languagelightingmise-en-scenemontage • narrative film • props • scene compositionset decorspatial relationshipsstory • tell the story • themesvisual designvisual elements

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 AUGUST 2011

The Digital Revolution: digital type was born in 1968

"In 1965, Dr. Ing. Rudolf Hell introduced the Digiset typesetting system. It was the first device to produce characters on a CRT entirely from digital masters. By the 1970's phototypesetting was replaced by stored information which was set as a series of small dots or closely spaced vertical lines that appeared solid in the finished product. The output speed was 1,000 to 10,000 characters per second.

DigiGrotesk was the first digital type font and was designed in 1968 by the Hell Design Studio and was available in seven weights from light to bold. Hermann Zapf, Gudrun von Hesse and Gerard Unger were early type designers for this new technology."

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TAGS

19651968characters • CRT • design historydevice • DigiGrotesk • Digiset typesetting system • digital mastersdigital revolutiondigital type • digital type font • Dr. Ing. Rudolf Hell • fonts • Gerard Unger • Gudrun von Hesse • Hell Design Studio • Hermann Zapf • Linotype GmbH • new technology • phototypesetting • typetype designerstypefacetypographyvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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