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Which clippings match 'Maori People' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 AUGUST 2013

In Spring One Plants Alone: intimate portrait of a mother and her son

"This is the story of Puhi, an aged Maori woman and Niki, her fully grown but wholly dependent son. The world they occupy is not a world of large events but the rituals of everyday life, traditions and interdependence. 'In Spring One Plants Alone' documents the minutiae of their very enclosed existence. Filmed over a period of one and a half years, it emerges as a rare, haunting and powerful portrayal of their life together. This is the story of their rituals and of their survival. The small and disconnected instances that we encounter form a lone vision of the rifts and the bond between an old woman and her disturbed son."

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TAGS

16mm1980 • Alun Bollinger • Aotearoa New Zealand • Chris Lancaster • cultural traditionscultural valuesdirect cinemadisableddocumentary filmdocumentary truth • enclosed existence • everyday lifefeature-length documentaryFirst Nations • In Spring One Plants Alone (1980) • Indigenousinterdependenceintimate lives • intimate perspectives • intimate portrait • isolated communities • isolationiwiJack BodyLeon NarbeyMaoriMaori eldersMaori people • Maori woman • minutiae • New Zealand cinema • Niki • personal rituals • personal storyportrait of everyday life • Puhi • Queen Elizabeth II Arts Councilremote communitiessocial realismsocial reality • Stephen Upston • student filmstraditionsVincent Ward

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2011

Mana Waka: feature-length documentary showing the re-building of the seven wakataua/war canoes of the Great Maori Fleet

"Mana Waka, working title Canoe, is a feature–length documentary made to launch New Zealand's 1990 centennial celebrations. The documentary has a fascinating history. Princess Te Puea Herangi of the Turangawaewae Marae, Ngauruawahia, was a great Maori leader committed to work that would uphold, and be used for the benefit of, the Maori people. During the late 1930s she conceived the idea of celebrating the 1940 centennial of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by re–building the seven wakataua/war canoes of the Great Fleet, According to legend these canoes had journeyed from Hawaiki to Aotearoa some 25 generations previously. Princess Te Puea asked stills photographer R.G.H. (Jim) Manley, who had not previously made a film, to film the re–building, and he did so over a period of three years. Up north in the Puketi Forest, a great kauri tree was felled for the building of the Nga–toki–matawhaorua canoe which is now housed at Waitangi. Two totara trees from the Oruanui Forest provided the timber for the canoes that were carved and built at Turangawaewae."

(Helen Martin, 8 July 2011, Onfilm Magazine)

Fig.1 Still from "Mana Waka": NZ 1990 Documentary prod co Nga Kaitiaki o Te Puea Estate and the Turangawaewae Marae Trust dir Merata Mita camera R.G.H. Manly (filmed 1937 – 1940) ed Annie Collins kai korero/narrator Tukuroirangi Morgan film preservation Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga The New Zealand Film Commission, Ngā Kaitiaki Ō Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua The New Zealand Film Archive, NFU Laboratory, NFU Sound finecut Nga Kaitiaki o Te Marae o Turangawaewae sound Merata Mita, David Madigan, Chris Verberg, Mike Hedges, Annie Collins. 85 minutes.

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TAGS

1930s193719401990Annie CollinsAotearoa New Zealandcanoecarvingcentennialcraftcultural heritagedocumentaryfeature-length documentaryfilm • Great Fleet • Hawaiki • heritageIndigenous • Jim Manley • kauri • Mana Waka (film) • MaoriMaori peopleMerata MitaNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • Nga Kaitiaki O Nga Taonga Whitiahua The New Zealand Film Archive • Ngauruawahia • NZ Film Archive • Oruanui Forest • photographerpreservation • Princess Te Puea Herangi • Puketi Forest • Te Tiriti o Waitangi • Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga The New Zealand Film Commission • totara • Treaty of Waitangi • Tukuroirangi Morgan • Turangawaewae Marae Trust • Waikato • wakataua • war canoes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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