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15 NOVEMBER 2012

UK Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum

Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum
Westminster Education Forum National Curriculum Seminar Series 2013
Timing: Morning, Wednesday, 13th February 2013
Venue: Central London

"As the Government concludes its National Curriculum review, this timely seminar focuses on the content of the new curriculum for Design and Technology (D&T) for each Key Stage, due to be introduced into schools from September 2014 – as well as the implementation challenges for schools. It will bring together key policymakers with school and college leaders, teaching unions, universities, employers and other stakeholders.

Delegates will assess the opportunities and challenges presented by D&T's designation as a 'foundation' subject, with a much less prescriptive Programme of Study, as well as the level of teaching time required to deliver the new Programme and whether it meets the needs of employers, colleges and universities.

Sessions also focus on wider issues in D&T including the quality of facilities available in both primary and secondary schools in England, the profile and CPD opportunities for D&T teachers and the role that industry can play in the delivery of D&T in schools."

(Westminster Education Forum, UK)

Fig.1 Chicago Middle School students participate in an invention school workshop led by James Dyson as the James Dyson Foundation begins its mission to encourage more American students to become future engineers and inventors, at the Sir Miles Davis Academy in Chicago, May 5, 2011 [http://momandmore.com/2011/05/james–dyson–foundation–just–launched.html].

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TAGS

20132014 • Academy of Culinary Arts • Bel Reed • Bill Nicholl • CPDcurriculumcurriculum delivery • David Anderson • Department for Education • design and construction • design and technologyDesign and Technology AssociationDesign Council (UK) • DT • EBacceducation policyengineering and designEnglandEnglish Baccalaureate • foundation subject • Gina White • Government • implementation challenges • innovation and creativity • Institution of Mechanical Engineers • Isobel Pollock • IT • key stage • lateral thinkinglobbyingnational curriculum • National Curriculum Seminar Series • North Baddesley Junior School • Ofsted • policy makersprimary schoolproblem-solving • programme of study • public policy • purposeful activities • Queen Elizabeths Grammar School • Richard Green • Royal Academy of Engineering • Sara Jayne Stanes • school leaders • secondary school • Susan Smith • synthetic thinkingtechnology educationUKUK GovernmentuniversitiesUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Leeds • WEET • WEETF • WeF • Westminster Education Forum • Westminster Forum Projects • WFNF • WFP • WHF • Whitehall • WLPF • WMF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 OCTOBER 2009

FIT: Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology

"FIT, the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology, pursues a user–centered approach to information and cooperation systems design. Usability and usefulness of IT are optimized in the interplay of work practice, organization, and process design. FIT's vision can be defined as human–centered computing in a process context."

(FIT)

TAGS

applied researchdiscoveryenquiryexperimentationFIT • Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology • HCIhuman-centred computingICTinsightITresearchresearch centreusabilityuser-centred

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 OCTOBER 2009

Grounded in Practice: Using Interpretive Research to Build Theory

"This paper provides guidance and an example for carrying out research using an interpretive framework to build theory of IS practice. The paper provides an example of (a) developing a theoretical framework, (b) how to choose an appropriate research method, (c) particulars of data collection and analysis, and (d) appropriate evaluative criteria applicable to interpretive research. The research example is a study of decision–making by owner–managers of small firms in the IT industry in Australia. The aim of the study (1) was directed toward exploring and describing the decision making process of owner/managers regarding their participation with on–the–job training schemes for the first time; and (2) to develop process theory explaining their participation. While structured as a typical research paper, this paper is different in that the focus is on describing the research process, conceptual issues and the research methods used rather than the findings. This format is important for two reasons: (1) unlike positivist research, there is no accepted general model for communicating interpretive research. (2) Similarly, few guidelines exist for conducting the inductive process central to interpretive research. Throughout the paper, issues relating to the choice and application of the methods in terms of conducting inductive research are discussed. Given the practical importance of interpretive research in information systems it is argued that documenting the decisions about the research process may be particularly valuable to researchers in the information systems community."

(Bruce H. Rowlands)

Rowlands B (2005) 'Grounded in Practice: Using Interpretive Research to Build Theory' The Electronic Journal of Business Research Methodology Volume 3 Issue 1, pp 81–92, available online at www.ejbrm.com
Download PDF from: http://www.ejbrm.com/issue/download.html?idArticle=152

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2006

Education within a context of fast-moving advances in science and technology

"Baroness Greenfield rose to ask Her Majesty's Government what account they are taking of the impact of fast–moving advances in science and technology on how young people think and learn in planning future education policy.

The noble Baroness said: My Lords, the 21st century is offering society an unprecedented raft of challenges. All at once science is now delivering a diverse range of information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology, with a speed and convergence that we could never have predicted even a decade ago.

For example, one recent survey of eight to 18 year–olds claimed that children were now spending on average 6.5 hours a day using electronic media. Most recently, the trend to multi–tasking – that is, using one or more devices in parallel – amounted to an effective 8.5 hours a day. Could this screen and multimedia culture impact on thinking and learning? The journalist Kevin Kelly summed up the issue very well:

'Screen culture is a world of constant flux, of endless sound bites, quick cuts and half–baked ideas. It is a flow of gossip tidbits, news headlines and floating first impressions. Notions don't stand alone but are massively interlinked to everything else; truth is not delivered by authors and authorities but is assembled by the audience'.

When we of the 20th century read a book, most usually the author takes you by the hand and you travel from the beginning to the middle to the end in a continuous narrative series of interconnected steps. It may not be a journey with which you agree or that you enjoy, but none the less as you turn the pages one train of thought succeeds the last in a logical fashion.

We can then of course compare one narrative with another. In so doing we start to build up a conceptual framework that enables us to evaluate further journeys, which in turn will influence our individualised framework. One might argue that this is the basis of education – education as we know it. It is the building up of a personalised conceptual framework, where we can relate incoming information to what we know already. We can place an isolated fact in a context that gives it significance. Traditional education has enabled us, if you like, to turn information into knowledge.

Now imagine that there is no robust conceptual framework. Imagine that you are sitting in front of a multimedia presentation where you are unable, because you have not had the experience of many different intellectual journeys, to evaluate what is flashing up on the screen. The most immediate reaction instead would be to place a premium on the most obvious feature, the immediate sensory content – we could call it the 'yuk' or 'wow' factor. You would be having an experience rather than learning. Here sounds and sights of a fast–paced, fast–moving, multimedia presentation would displace any time for reflection or any idiosyncratic or imaginative connections that we might make as we turn the pages and then stare at the wall to reflect."
(House of Lords debates, 20 April 2006, 3:18 pm : Column 1220)

Baroness Susan Greenfield. (2006). 'Education: Science and Technology', Lords Hansard, UK.

Fig.1 Michelangelo (circa 1511). 'The Creation of Adam'.

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