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Which clippings match 'Working Prototypes' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 OCTOBER 2014

Circuit Scribe: rollerball pen that writes with conductive silver ink

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TAGS

2014 • Analisa Russo • Arduino • Bok Yeop Ahn • breadboard • Brett Walker • circuit • circuit building • circuit diagram • Circuit Scribe • clear box (engineering) • colloidal silver ink • conductive ink • conductive silver ink • DIY electronics • electronic circuitry • electronic components • electronics • Electroninks Incorporated • Eric Rosenbaum • KickstarterMaKey MaKeypen and inkprinted circuit board • rollerball pen • schematic diagram • schematic sketches • science educationUniversity of Illinoiswomen in technology • working prototype • working prototypes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

Exploration oriented design process: focussing on the interplay between designer, techniques and materials in design research

"My field of interest is what I will call an exploration oriented design process included in design research; a process focussing on the interplay between designer, techniques and materials. The role of the artefact is to act as a reflecting and responding means for pushing the research process forward to clarify what is possible and how, regarding the research question. A related example of such an approach to research is found at the research cluster Autonomatic (2009) at Falmouth College University, which do research that explores the use of digital manufacturing technologies in the creative process of designing and making three dimensional objects.

As a contrast, consider a problem oriented design process included in design research. That is, designing which, although research embedded, nevertheless aims at developing working prototypes or appearance models, just as ordinary professional design. An example is the Ph.D. project by Jonathan Allen discussed by Pedgley and Wormald (2007). The aim of Jonathan Allen's research was to advance the design of, and champion new approaches to designing, products for people with severe communication disabilities and physical impairment. During his project, he developed a fully working prototype communication device.

However, in the present paper I shall demonstrate that exploration oriented design can be fruitful as a design research method, because it is relieved from the usual obligation to fulfil a purpose of everyday use, solve problems or fulfil certain needs. As we shall see, the exploration oriented design process does not proceed as a series of isolated experiments, but rather as a cluster of parallel and interdependent experiments, which as a whole reflect the potential of the research question. I will argue that this approach turns design practice in which the design researcher is trained into an effective tool for design research."

(Flemming Tvede Hansen, p.99, 2009)

Hansen, Flemming Tvede. (2009). "A Search for Unpredictable Relationships". EKSIG 2009: Experiential Knowledge, Method & Methodology, Experiential Knowledge Special Interest Group.

TAGS

2009 • appearance models • Autonomatic (research cluster) • communication device • communication disability • design practicedesign researchdesign research methodologydesign researcherdesign techniquesdesigningdesigning and making • digital manufacturing • digital manufacturing technologies • EKSIG • everyday use • exploration oriented design • exploration oriented design process • Falmouth College University • Flemming Tvede Hansen • fulfil needs • interdependent experiments • interplay between • isolated experiments • Jonathan Allen • new approaches to design • ordinary professional design • Owain Pedgley • parallel experiments • Paul Wormald • physical impairment • problem oriented design process • reflecting and responding • research process • role of the artefact • solving problemsthree dimensional objectsworking prototypes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2011

Design scholarship through the Research Project module

"The final year NTU Multimedia module called the Research Project provides useful insight into the changing knowledge relationships operating within regionalised knowledge contexts. The module requires students to demonstrate scholarship that spans multiple traditional domains, it requires them to: situate their work and communicate its worth through academic writing; build conceptual models which they must be able to explore through applied research; express their design knowledge and craft skills so that they are able to plan and produce creative work; and design software and application development skills to produce working prototypes. In this way the module provides a challenge which is unique to such programmes. It requires that students engage in a sustained conceptual and technical discovery process which is located within a rapidly changing knowledge context."

(Simon Perkins, 2011)

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TAGS

academic programmesacademic writingapplication developmentapplied research • build conceptual models • changing knowledge relationships • conceptual and technical • craft skillscreative work • demonstrate scholarship • design knowledgedesign softwarediscovery process • module • multimediaNTUNTU Multimedia • plan and produce • PRP • rapidly changing knowledge context • regionalisation of knowledge • regionalised knowledge contexts • research project • Research Project (NTU) • research ripple • RP • Simon Perkinsskillsstudentsworking prototypes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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