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Which clippings match 'Reportage' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 DECEMBER 2014

Sympathy for the Devil (One + One)

"This is one of those rare and unsettling examples of a rock film which has the all the immediacy of reportage from a distant war–zone. The terrain is Olympic Studios in London in June 1968, where the Rolling Stones, recovering from the critical mauling of At Their Satanic Majesty's Request, are at work on the tracks that would become Beggars' Banquet. The film–maker was Jean–Luc Godard, at the height of his reputation as Europe's most daring director. Godard had briefly left Paris for London in the wake of the Paris riots of May '68 with the aim of making a film about art, power and revolution. The Stones, at their most dazzling and Luciferian, were, as Godard saw it, perfect for the role of agents of anarchy in a movie whose stated aim was to 'subvert, ruin and destroy all civilised values'. ...

As the track is worked and reworked, we glimpse the inner dynamics of the Stones. Bill Wyman and Brian Jones are on the margins (Jones spends most of the film shuttered away, ostracised, playing an inaudible and irrelevant acoustic guitar). Charlie Watts is every inch the dapper jazz mod, as spare with his incisive drumming as he is meticulous with his clothes. Jagger is languid, bored and then sexually ambiguous and cruel, coming only properly to life when he sings the lyrics. Most compelling of all is Keith, changing rhythms and cues at will, eyes gleaming, restless and fiercely intelligent, a million miles from the stoned zombie of legend. When he choreographs and leads the band and acolytes (including the witchy Anita Pallenberg) into the 'whoo, whoos' that make the track so malicious, it is sinister and stunning."

(Andrew Hussey, 21 May 2006, The Guardian)

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TAGS

1960s1968 • agents of anarchy • Anita Pallenberg • Beggars Banquet (1968) • Bill Wyman • Black Panthers • bloodied corpse • bluesy grind • bookseller • Brian Jones • car park • Charlie Watts • Dave Mason • first-person narrative • jazz mod • Jean-Luc Godard • Jimmy Miller • JLG • Keith Richards • languid • left-wing idealsleftwing activistLondon • Lucifer • Maoist hippies • Mein Kampf • Mick Jagger • music documentarymusic recording • music studio • Nicky Hopkins • Olympic Studios London • One Plus One Sympathy for the Devil (1968) • Paris May 1968 • radical chic • recording artistsrecording sessionrecording studioreportage • Ric Grech • rock musicrockumentary • Rocky Dijon • samba • sexually ambiguous • sixtiessixties cool • studio scene • The GuardianThe Rolling Stones • urban guerrilla • Watts Street Gospel Choir

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JULY 2013

Art Review: international contemporary art magazine

"ArtReview is one of the world's leading international contemporary art magazines. Founded in 1949, it is dedicated to expanding contemporary art's audience and reach. We believe that art plays a vital role in inspiring a richer, more profound understanding of human experience, culture and society today. Aimed at both a specialist and a general audience, the magazine features a mixture of criticism, reviews, reportage and specially commissioned artworks, and offers the most established, in–depth and intimate portrait of international contemporary art in all its shapes and forms."

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TAGS

1949 • art reviews • ArtReview • audience and reach • commissioned artworks • contemporary art • contemporary art magazines • culture and societyfine art • fine art publications • fine artist • fine artshuman experienceinternational • international contemporary art • magazineart criticism • publicationreportagereviewsshapes and formsvisual art • visual art publications • visual arts exhibitions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 AUGUST 2005

Enemy Image: where is the human tragedy?

"The [Enemy Image] traces the development of the image of war on American television from Vietnam to the present day. Enemy Image uses outstanding reports and images from American wars of the last 30 years to explore the changing role of the war correspondent and the strange disappearance of dead bodies from the image of war. Writer–Director Mark Daniels comments, 'This film developed out of my encounter with the remarkable Vietnam War reporting of Wilfred Burchett and Roger Pic. They witnessed and reported that war as no other Westerners could, and their body of work remains an historical treasure. 'Their films opposed American images of technical and material power with images of revolutionary solidarity, improvisation, and sacrifice. With the War in Iraq, – journalists 'embedded' with American and British forces brought sights and sounds from the battlefield to the living room, live.' But where was the tragedy? Where was the cruelty? Where was the heroism?"
(The Guardian)

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AmericaAmerican War in VietnambattlefieldCBScurrent affairsdocumentary • Enemy Image • guerrillaguerrilla tacticsguerrilla warfare • image of war • Iraqjournalism • Mark Daniels • mediaphotojournalismreportage • Roger Pic • televisionVietnamVietnam warwarwar correspondent • Wilfred Burchett
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