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02 NOVEMBER 2015

Hakanaï dance performance 2013

"Hakanaï is a solo choreographic performance that unfolds through a series of images in motion. In Japanese Hakanaï denotes that which is temporary and fragile, evanescent and transient, and in this case something set between dreams and reality. While widely associated with nature, the term is now often used to elicit an intangible aspect of the human condition and its precariousness. It encompasses two elements: that concerning the human being as well as that related to dreams. This symbolic relationship is the foundation of the dance composition in which a dancer gives life to a space somewhere between the borders of imagination and reality, through her interactions with the images she encounters. The images are on-stage animations that move in physical patterns according to the rhythm of the live sounds that they follow. The performance's outcome is the revelation of a digital installation to its audience."

Fig.1 Composed and Directed by Adrien Mondot & Claire Bardainne; Dance (alternating) Akiko Kajihara, Satchie Noro, Virginie Barjonet, Francesca Ziviani; Digital Interpretation (alternating); Adrien Mondot, Claire Bardainne, Jérémy Chartier, Loïs Drouglazet; Sound Design; Christophe Sartori, Loïs Drouglazet, Pierre Xucla; Sound Interpretation Christophe Sartori, Loïs Drouglazet, Jérémy Chartier, Pierre Xucla; Set Design Martin Gautron, Vincent Perreux; Digital Toolset Loïs Drouglazet; Light Design Jérémy Chartier; Outside Viewer Charlotte Farcet; Costume Design Johanna Elaouf; Technical Director Alexis Bergeron; Administrator Marek Vuiton; Booking Charlotte Auché; Production assistant Margaux Létang; Produced by; Adrien M / Claire B; Co-productions, Funding & Support; Les Subsistances, Lyon / Centre Pompidou-Metz; La Ferme du Buisson, Scène nationale de Marne-la-Vallée, Noisiel / Hexagone Scène Nationale Arts Sciences – Meylan / Les Champs Libres, Rennes / Centre des Arts, Enghien-les-Bains / Maison de la Culture de Nevers et de la Nièvre / City of Lille / DICRéAM; The Adrien M / Claire B Company is accredited by DRAC Rhône-Alpes, Rhône-Alpes Region and is supported by the City of Lyon.

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TAGS

2013 • Adrien Mondot • Akiko Kajihara • Alexis Bergeron • algorithmic composition • algorithmic pattern • art and technology • artistic duo • between dream and reality • black and white • Charlotte Farcet • choreographic performance • Christophe Sartori • Claire Bardainne • computational artscube • dance composition • dance performancedesign formalism • digital backdrop • digital interpretation • digital puppetry • evanescence • fragilityFrancesca Zivianigenerative designgeometric pattern • Hakanai (2013) • immersive worksinteractive installation • Jeremy Chartier • Johanna Elaouf • light projection • Lois Drouglazet • Margaux Letang • Martin Gautron • movement performance • performance installation • Pierre Xucla • projection mappingpuppetryrhythm • Satchie Noro • sensors • snowflake • solo choreographic performance • solo performance • spider web • symbolic relationship • synapsetemporarytransiencetransitory movementtranslucence • translucent veils • Vincent Perreux • Virginie Barjonet • visual journey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2012

Transitional Cardboard Cathedral for Christchurch

"2011年2月22日に発生したM6.3のカンタベリー地震は、街のシンボル的存在であったクライストチャーチ大聖堂にも深刻な被害をもたらした。これを受け、新たな仮設のカテドラルを設計することとなった。

現地で調達可能な紙管とコンテナーを用いて三角形の断面を形成する。オリジナルの大聖堂の平面と立面のジオメトリーを受け継ぎ、同じ長さの紙管の角度を徐々に変化させている。700人収容可能で、教会としての機能の他に、多くのイベントやコンサートとしての使用も視野に入れている。

2011年7月31日に、同地にてプレス発表が行われた。2013年2月頃の完成を目指している。

The February 2011 Christchurch earthquake (magnitude 6.3) inflicted crippling damage on the Christchurch Cathedral which was the symbol of city. In response to this situation, we were asked to design new temporary cathedral.

Paper tubes of the equal length and 20 ft containers form triangular shape. Since geometry is decided by plan and elevations of the original cathedral, there is a gradual change in each angle of paper tubes. This cathedral, which has a capacity of 700 people, can be used as an event space and a concert space.

There was a media conference in Christchurch on 31st of July, 2011. We aim to open cardboard cathedral in February, 2013."

(Shigeru Ban Architects)

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185819th century • 2011 earthquake • 201322 February 2011 • A-frame • Anglican • Aotearoa New Zealand • architectural form • architecture designbuildingcardboard • cardboard architecture • cardboard cathedral • cathedralChristchurchchurchearthquakeearthquake reconstructionFebruary 2011 • George Gilbert Scott • honeycomb cardboard • honeycomb structureJapanese • Latimer Square • material interventionsmaterialitypaper • parishioners • permanent building • re-erected • SBA • Shigeru Ban • Shigeru Ban Architects • steel • temporarytemporary building • temporary structure • temporary structurestimbertraditional building • transitional • Transitional Cathedral • tubes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2012

Pop-up art transform Christchurch earthquake barriers

"Bryan L'Estrange has been chosen to curate an art exhibition in Sumner on canvases stretched across the container fronts. They will be installed at Sumners' Peacock's Gallop stretch of Containers. In some cases the containers are 12 metres long. ..

Dinesh Patel is the designer, Bryan LEstrange is curator. They are taking submissions from artists and looking for sponsors now. Some of the artists already confirmed include Ben Reid, Tony Delautour and Kees Bruin as well as Simon Kaan, Tony Cribb and Jason Kelly."

(L'Estrange Art Gallery, 06 September 2011, The Big Idea)

[The shipping containers were put in place as barriers to prevent injury by falling rocks, after the September 2010 earthquake in the seaside Christchurch suburb of Sumner in Aotearoa New Zealand.]

Fig.1 Bryan L'Estrange (2011), "Container exhibition Sumner Christchurch".

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2011Aotearoa New Zealandartart exhibitionart galleryartistsartworkbarrier • Ben Reid • Bryan LEstrange • Christchurch • Christchurch artists • community • container • containers • curator • Dinesh Patel • earthquake • earthquake barriers • exhibitionexhibition spacehoardings • humanisation • Jason Kelly • Kees Bruin • large format printing • local presence • open-air art gallery • Peacocks Gallop • platform for artists • pop-up • pop-up art • pop-up gallery • reinscribe • shipping container • shipping containers • Simon Kaan • South Island • Sumner • temporary • temporary art • The Big Idea • Tony Cribb • Tony Delautour • ugly • urban landscape

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2011

The pop-up shop phenomenon

"Pop–ups are the epitome of our high–speed, short–attention–span culture. They are restaurants, bars, clubs and shops that spring up in unexpected locations, cause a storm, and disappear just before the fashion crowd moves on to the next big thing. Comme des Garçons started the trend in 2004 with its guerrilla stores. Now London is totally pop–up–tastic. Following the success of the Reindeer restaurant, the Bistrotheque boys have now decamped (actually and aesthetically) from Bethnal Green to Burlington Gardens. Flash, their grown–up restaurant in the Royal Academy, will be over in just that. Tyler Brûlé has turned shopgirl in his design–led roving microstore for Monocle magazine. Blink and you'd have missed Mary Portas's hyper–pop–up: open for just one hour to sell vintage clothes in Bishopsgate earlier this month. Then there's the Foundry, flogging quirky homewares in different spaces around the capital; Atelier Moët on Bond Street, where you can customise champagne bottles (although its last day is today); and the Proud Gallery, which started off as merely a marquee over a car park.

It's a perfect concept for our hype–heavy society. Nowhere can be the hottest place to be seen in for more than six months, so by pulling it down and starting again, businesses can be constantly reinvented. Because they are temporary, pop–ups can take risks. They don't need as much polish, so they don't need as much investment – perfect for recessionistas."

(Damian Barr, 28 December 2008, Times Online)

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2004 • Atelier Moet • bars • Bethnal Green • Bishopsgate • Bistrotheque boys • Bond Street • Burlington Gardens • clubs • constantly reinvented • consumerismeconomic recessionentrepreneurship • fashion crowd • flash retailing • global financial crisis • guerrilla stores • high-speed • hype-heavy society • hyper-pop-up • locationLondon • marquee • Mary Portas • Monocle magazine • next big thing • opportunismphenomenon • place to be seen • pop-uppop-up retailpop-up shop • pop-up store • pop-up-tastic • pop-ups • Proud Gallery • recessionistas • Reindeer restaurant • reinvent • restaurants • retailrisk-taking • Royal Academy • shop • shopgirl • short-attention-span culture • spaces • spring up • temporary • the Foundry • Tyler Brule • unexpected • vintage clothes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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