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18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Window shopping with Kate Spade Saturday's touchscreen storefront

"Kate Spade Saturday has taken up residence in New York with four pop–up digital stores appearing as window fronts around the city. ... Standing in front of the window, shoppers can click to explore looks, opt to buy them via PayPal, and best of all have them delivered with an hour to wherever they are in the city thanks to a partnership with eBay. Security also isn't a concern–despite being a giant screen, the initiative doesn't ask for credit card information or your address for every other passerby to see, instead texting you with a link that leads you to your window shop bag on your own phone instead."

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TAGS

2013 • 24hr shopping • click to exploreclothing companyclothing retailer • designer brand • digital storefront • digitally enhanced pop-up shop • eBayfuture interfacesglassyhaptic interfacein-personinteraction designinteractive display • interactive touchscreen • Kate Spade • Kate Spade New York (designer brand) • Kate Spade Saturday (clothing label) • m-commerceNew Yorknon-place • PayPal • pictures under glass • pop-up digital store • pop-up shopprogrammed useretail spaceretail storesingle-minded spaces • store window • storefronttouchscreen • touchscreen storefront • visual facade • William McComb • window display • window front • window shopping

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2011

The pop-up shop phenomenon

"Pop–ups are the epitome of our high–speed, short–attention–span culture. They are restaurants, bars, clubs and shops that spring up in unexpected locations, cause a storm, and disappear just before the fashion crowd moves on to the next big thing. Comme des Garçons started the trend in 2004 with its guerrilla stores. Now London is totally pop–up–tastic. Following the success of the Reindeer restaurant, the Bistrotheque boys have now decamped (actually and aesthetically) from Bethnal Green to Burlington Gardens. Flash, their grown–up restaurant in the Royal Academy, will be over in just that. Tyler Brûlé has turned shopgirl in his design–led roving microstore for Monocle magazine. Blink and you'd have missed Mary Portas's hyper–pop–up: open for just one hour to sell vintage clothes in Bishopsgate earlier this month. Then there's the Foundry, flogging quirky homewares in different spaces around the capital; Atelier Moët on Bond Street, where you can customise champagne bottles (although its last day is today); and the Proud Gallery, which started off as merely a marquee over a car park.

It's a perfect concept for our hype–heavy society. Nowhere can be the hottest place to be seen in for more than six months, so by pulling it down and starting again, businesses can be constantly reinvented. Because they are temporary, pop–ups can take risks. They don't need as much polish, so they don't need as much investment – perfect for recessionistas."

(Damian Barr, 28 December 2008, Times Online)

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TAGS

2004 • Atelier Moet • bars • Bethnal Green • Bishopsgate • Bistrotheque boys • Bond Street • Burlington Gardens • clubs • constantly reinvented • consumerismeconomic recessionentrepreneurship • fashion crowd • flash retailing • global financial crisis • guerrilla stores • high-speed • hype-heavy society • hyper-pop-up • locationLondon • marquee • Mary Portas • Monocle magazine • next big thing • opportunismphenomenon • place to be seen • pop-uppop-up retailpop-up shop • pop-up store • pop-up-tastic • pop-ups • Proud Gallery • recessionistas • Reindeer restaurant • reinvent • restaurants • retailrisk-taking • Royal Academy • shop • shopgirl • short-attention-span culture • spaces • spring up • temporary • the Foundry • Tyler Brule • unexpected • vintage clothes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2009

KiosKiosK: free retail space for new creative businesses

"Designers Wayne and Gerardine Hemingway MBE have today called for budding creative entrepreneurs to come forward to sell their products from 'KiosKiosK' – an innovative 'pop up shop' that will provide free temporary retail space for start–up businesses in central London this summer.

The first KiosKiosK – designed by the Hemingways and supported by the Mayor of London and the London Sustainable Development Commission's London Leaders programme – will be housed for two months (July to September 2009) outside London's iconic City Hall. It will offer rent–free space for people with creative products to sell such as ceramics, artworks, creative gifts and fashion, helping new businesses with great ideas to get a stepup on the ladder to success.

It is hoped that low cost 'pop up' shops of this kind will provide a template for London and towns and cities across the UK by offering a helping hand for businesses that may be priced out of high cost, high street and prime retail locations. This will also help to support smaller, independent shops increasing consumer choices.

The Hemingways started the famous Red or Dead brand from low cost 'easy in, easy out' starter units at Camden and Kensington Markets and Affleck's Palace in Manchester, but believe it has now become increasingly difficult for start up creative businesses to find affordable retail space."

(KiosKiosK press release, 27 May 2009, UK)

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TAGS

2009 • affordable retail space • consumer choicecreative businessescreative entrepreneurs • creative gifts • creative products • easy in easy out • Gerardine Hemingway • great ideas • helping new businesses • independent shopskiosk • KiosKiosK • little-bitty store • London Sustainable Development Commission • pop-up shop • prime locations • Red or Dead • rent-free • retail spacesmall businessesstart-up business • temporary retail space • the high street • UK • Wayne Hemingway

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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