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Which clippings match 'Nintendo Wii' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 APRIL 2012

Butcher's Hook: three students repurpose an old London butcher's shop to establish their design studio

"Butcher's Hook is (or perhaps that should be will be) a three–member design studio and gallery based in an old butcher's shop in London's Portobello. The studio has been formed by Benio Urbanowicz, James Coltman, Josh Blanchett and Dan Jones, students from Kingston and LLC, all of whom graduate this summer. ...

In order to introduce themselves to the local populace, Butcher's Hook set up a digital display using an old Nintendo Wii remote, custom made Infa–Red yellow pencils, a wireless doorbell, a printer and a few extra ingredients.

'We gave away free art made by the user themselves, with the option to receive a digital copy sent to them,' they say. 'We had a great weekend, where over 150 people got involved, through their own choice... and every single one went home to find our business cards printed on the back of their own masterpiece.'

As well as launching their studio, Butcher's Hook has also entered the project into the D&AD Student Awards in response to the brief Make Your Mark."

Posted by Creative Review, 4 April 2012, 16:13

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TAGS

2012 • Benio Urbanowicz • BFIbook cover designbusiness incubatorButchers Hook • butchers shop • competitioncreative industriesCreative Review (magazine)custom madeD and AD • Dan Jones • design businessdesign studentsdesign studio • design studio and gallery • digital copy • digital display • DIYemploymententrepreneurshipgraduate bridgegraduate designersgraduatesgraphic designindustry realitiesinfraredinitiative • James Coltman • Josh Blanchett • Kingston University • launching a studio • LLC • local community projects • LondonLondon College of Communication (UAL) • Make Your Mark • new studio • Nintendo Wiipencil • Portobello • real-life studiorepurposingstart-upstudent awardsstudents • walk-in studio • window dressing • wireless doorbe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JULY 2011

Disruptive versus Radical Innovations

"The innovator's dilemma is this: a company that does everything by the book – listening to customers, managing by facts, being disciplined about costs and quality, and so forth – can get blindsided by an innovation that rapidly takes away its markets, because it was doing everything right. The innovations that cause this 'why bad things happen to good companies' dilemma are disruptive innovations. The signature story of disruption reads as follows: an upstart low–end competitor displaces a much larger incumbent in a market, with the incumbent either retreating upmarket to higher margin/lower volume products or dying out altogether. ...

Examples are smaller, cheaper hard drives disrupting incumbent hard drive makers, hydraulic shovels disrupting cable–winch shovels (an early 20th century example), PCs disrupting mainframes, ink jet printers disrupting laser printers and, most recently, the Nintendo Wii starting to disrupt the Playstation and the Xbox.

Major though they were, innovations such as CDs, laser printing and jet airplane engines were not disruptive with respect to the technologies they displaced ( cassette tapes, light lens Xerography and piston engines respectively). In each case, the incumbents benefited from these non–disruptive, or sustaining innovations.

The key point to remember is that disruption is a market/business phenomenon and has little to do with technology per se. In particular, a disruptive innovation may or may not represent a major technical breakthrough. Major breakthroughs, which are called 'radical' in Christenson's model, may or may not be disruptive, while minor, or 'incremental' innovations can be massively disruptive. The opposite of disruptive is sustaining. Why and how does disruption happen?

A disruptive innovation usually starts as a low–quality differentiated product in a low–volume marginal segment of a much larger mature market, which demands attributes that the mainstream market does not, and which is willing to give up performance attributes the mainstream market is not (example, Wii customers willing to give up sheer processing horsepower for 3d input capability).

A marginal player occupies this segment and starts growing rapidly, solving initial quality problems while retaining a cost advantage.

The incumbent mature market leader, no matter how visionary, is forced to ignore the opportunity because it does not meet the growth needs dictated by its larger size, and also because the disruptive product is not yet good enough for its mainstream customers.

The marginal player goes through a learning curve, solves its quality problems and suddenly starts threatening the market leader in its main markets

The incumbent scrambles to put together a response, nearly always fails because of the disruptor's head start and optimized culture, and retreats to a higher–end market."

(Venkatesh Rao, 23 July 2007)

TAGS

breakthrough • business phenomenon • cable-winch shovels • cassette tapes • CDs • Clayton Christensencompetitor • differentiated product • disruptiondisruptive innovation • disruptive innovations • growth needs • hard drive • hydraulic shovels • incremental • ink jet printer • innovation • innovations • innovators dilemma • jet airplane engines • laser printer • laser printing • light lens Xerography • listening to customers • mainframemarket leader • market phenomenon • Nintendo Wii • non-disruptive • opportunity • PCs • piston engines • Playstationproductradicalradical innovationsustaining innovations • technical breakthrough • Venkatesh Rao • Xbox

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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