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Which clippings match 'Internet' keyword pg.1 of 20
16 MARCH 2016

British television series 'Database': How to send an 'E mail' in 1984

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1980s1984BBC MicroBritish television seriesCommodore 64 • Commodore VIC-20 • computer agecomputer historycomputing history • Database (TV series 1984) • Dragon 32 • Dragon 64 • early adopterearly computer-eraforerunnerhome computerinformation ageInternet • Jane Ashton • Julian Green • Micronet • modem • online server • Pat Green • personal computerprecursor technology • press telephone • Prestel • Prestel MicroComputing • rotary telephone • telecommunicationstelephonetelevisionThames TelevisionTV seriesUK • UK Post Office • VIC-20 • Videotex • Viewdata technology • ZX SpectrumZX81

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2014

Net Neutrality: A Free and Open Internet

"More than any other invention of our time, the Internet has unlocked possibilities we could just barely imagine a generation ago. And here's a big reason we've seen such incredible growth and innovation: Most Internet providers have treated Internet traffic equally. That's a principle known as 'net neutrality' — and it says that an entrepreneur's fledgling company should have the same chance to succeed as established corporations, and that access to a high school student's blog shouldn't be unfairly slowed down to make way for advertisers with more money."

(Barack Obama, 10 November 2014, The White House)

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2014Barack Obama • established corporations • Federal Communications Commission (FCC) • fledgling company • growth and innovation • Internet • Internet provider • internet service providerInternet trafficnet neutralityNorth America • President Obama • United States of America • unlocked possibilities • White House

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2014

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

"The year is 1974, and Arthur C. Clarke is standing inside one of those cavernous computer centers that held the massive machines of the day. ...

He doesn't call it the internet. But he says that even before the dawn of the twenty–first century, the boy's home will include a computer console – something much smaller than those massive machines humming in the background in 1974 – that provides 'all the information he needs for his everyday life: his bank statements, his theater reservations, all the information you need over the course of living in a complex modern society.' ...

'They will make it possible to live really anywhere we like. Any businessman, any executive, could live almost anywhere on Earth and still do his business through a device like this,' he says. 'It means we won't be stuck in cities. We'll live out in the country or wherever we please and still carry on complete interactions with other human beings as well as computers.' Our cities haven't exactly shrunk. But we're certainly able to connect with each other from wherever we might be."

(Cade Metz , March 2013, Wired.com)

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19742001ABC TV (Australia) • Arthur C Clarke • Australian Broadcasting Corporation • computer centre • computer console • connected worldconnectivity • every household • future forecastingfuturisthome computer • household computer • Internetpredicting the futurepunch cards • punch-card reader • science fiction writer • tape drives • translocationWired (magazine)world connectivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2014

Horizon: The defenders of anonymity on the internet

"Yet while anonymity offers a potential bulwark against surveillance, for those who do not wish to be watched, it has also helped in the development of that part of the online world known as the dark web.

Sites on the dark web like Silk Road have used Tor technology to hide their location and yet still be available to users who wish to visit them.

The dark web has now become a focus for law enforcement officers who believe it is facilitating a variety of illegal activities including financial crime and child abuse."

(Mike Radford, 3 September 2014, BBC News)

Fig.1 "Inside the Dark Web" 2014, television programme, BBC Two – Horizon, Series 51, Episode 4, first broadcast: 3 September 2014.

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2014 • anonymising networks • anonymity • anonymous communication • anonymous protocol • anonymous system • anonymous web browsing • BBC Twobitcoin • black market • Chelsea Manning • child abusecommunications monitoring • controversial technology • crime evasion • criminal actscryptographycybercrime • dark internet • dark web • data securityDavid Chaum • deep web • deepnet • detection • digital realm • dissidents • distributed filesharing network • distributed network • Edward Snowden • encryption • file sharing • financial crime • free market economy • GCHQ • government agencies • hidden network • hidden web • Horizon (BBC TV series) • I2P • information flowsinformation retrieval • information use • Internet • Interpol • invisible web • Jacob Appelbaum • Joss Wright • Julian Assangelaw enforcement • Mix Network • monitoring • National Security Agency • NSAonline activities • online marketplace • online space • Oxford Internet Institute • privacy and security • search engines • Silk Road (marketplace) • surface web • surveillancetelecommunicationsTim Berners-LeeTortraffic analysis • Troels Oerting • US Naval Research Laboratory Tor • Wikileaksworld wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2013

Eric Knorr: originator of the term Web 2.0

"Eric Knorr, executive editor of InfoWorld, first used the term in front of a large audience in the December 2003 special issue of the business IT magazine CIO. Later, as we pointed out in Chapter 1, most people credit Battelle and O'Reilly with coining the term at an O'Reilly Media conference brain–storming session in 2004. There, Dale Dougherty and Craig Cline also used the term, which shortly became notable. Dale Dougherty, Web pioneer and O'Reilly vice president, noted during the conference that 'far from having 'crashed,' the Web was more important than ever, with exciting new applications and sites popping up with surprising regularity.'"

(Joan Curtis and Barbara Giamanco, 2010, pp.23–24)

Joan Curtis and Barbara Giamanco (2010). "The New Handshake: Sales Meets Social Media", Praeger Publishers Inc.

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2003 • business IT • Craig Cline • Dale DoughertyEric Knorrhistory of ideas • InfoWorld (magazine) • Internet • John Battelle • OReilly Mediaoriginatorphrase • term • Tim OReillyWeb 2.0

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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