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Which clippings match 'Undercurrents' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 OCTOBER 2012

Blue Velvet: the dark underside of America's collective fantasies

"Blue Velvet begins with the lily–white small town of America's collective fantasies and shows us its dark underside: drugs, violence, sex, and particularly sexual perversion. Our hero, Jeffrey, hiding in the dark, peers through the slats of Dorothy Vallens' closet at Dorothy getting undressed and Frank's strange sadomasochistic sex with her. Jeffrey stands for all of us American filmgoers peering (voyeuristically!) at Evil in traditional American films. Lynch clues us as to how we should read his film when he shows us a cluster of ants under the Beaumonts' pretty lawn. This is Tennyson's nature red in tooth and claw–the underside of cutesy Lumberton with its free enterprise propensity for cutting down trees."

(Norman N. Holland)

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TAGS

1986 • Alfred Tennyson • ants • Blue Velvet (1986) • collective fantasies • communitydark undersideDavid Lynch • Dennis Hopper • Dorothy Vallens • drugs • evil in films • feature filmfilm • filmgoers peering • free enterprise • hiding in the dark • Isabella Rossellini • Kyle MacLachlan • Laura Dern • lily-white • Lumberton • melodramanature • pretty lawn • repressionsadomasochistic sexsexsexual perversionsmall townsmall town Americasocietyundercurrents • underside • violencevisual spectaclevoyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2011

The Island: Stephen Walter's London Series

"London is one of the great living palimpsests of our time. Its layers of history and its constant energy to re–invent itself fuels this vast grey magnet. I was spurd on by the great Map Makers of London's past – John Roque, Greenwood and Phyllis Pearsall (the originator of the A–Z). Informed by my own insights and knowledge, I combined further research on the Internet and through writers such as Peter Ackroyd and Ian Sinclair.

The resulting map, a spoof of the historical ones of old, would challenge the first impressions of its viewer; touching on the Capital's vastness, its secrets and its undercurrents. With this process in mind, I began to edit the information, keeping what I felt were historically important, interesting, relevant and amusing. These fantastical additions and epithets are purposefully innocent and acidic, trivial and serious. The Map is as much about the personality of its viewer than it is about of my own. In other words it acts as a mirror.

Britain is a collection of islands and it undoubtedly forms part of our identity. This provincialism; the centre of many industries and in particular the London Centric Art world and its rise again to a world city status add to its identity as an icon, separated from the rest of the country. I wanted to perceive London as another one of these 'islands', and so when mapping the coastline around its Borough edges I was happy to discover Carshalton Beaches coinciding with this border."

(Stephen Walter)

Fig.1&2 Stephen Walter, "The Island"

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TAGS

ancestral domainsancestral domainsborders • Carshalton Beaches • cartographycity mapscultural identitydrawing • epithets • everyday • fantastical additions • graphic representation • Greenwood • hand-drawn mapshistorical importancehistorical map • Ian Sinclair • icon • islands • John Roque • layers of history • London • London Centric Art • map makers • map of Londonmapmakingmapspalimpsest • Peter Ackroyd • Phyllis Pearsall • provincial • provincialism • secretspatial narrative • Stephen Walter • streetsubversion • The Island • UKundercurrentsurban centrevisual communicationvisualisationworld view

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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