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Which clippings match 'Icon' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 MARCH 2014

Symbaloo: create collections through Windows 8 styled social bookmarking tool

"Symbaloo is a personal startpage that allows you to easily navigate the web and compile your favorite site all in to one visual interface. Save your bookmarks in the cloud and access them from anywhere with any device."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Bioglyphs: Generating images in collaboration with nature's events

"Reconstructive postmodernism proposes an alternative to a mechanistic interpretation of the world. The mechanistic model, which assumes that the world consists of discrete objects, has led to a 'disenchanted' interpretation of nature. In contrast to this objectification, the reconstructive model interprets nature as being primarily constituted of interacting events.

Since the 1960s ecological artists have developed strategies of representing this reenchanted view of nature through its phenomena or events. A number of these artists have sought to use photography to represent this view. However when such works are presented in photographic form I argue that the use of a camera tends to objectify the event.

In order to avoid the objectifying tendency of photography a number of contemporary artists have developed photographic methods of image–making which dispense with the camera. Bioglyphs, the creative practice of this current research, have been linked to the work of this group because of a shared approach to the use of photographic materials. However, if we assess the role of icon and index within photography, we can see that this approach may not always be sympathetic to the project of these artists.

Three key outcomes are identified. The first is the clarification of the concepts icon and index as applied to photography. Photographic images are shown to be primarily iconic rather than indexical. The thesis argues that iconic images tend to objectify the world whereas indexical images tend to represent the world as being constituted by events. Iconic photographic images therefore contribute to a disenchanted view of the world.

The second is that this reassessment of icon and index highlights a clear distinction between bioglyphs and most of the other camera–less images with which they are associated. In contrast to the iconicity of camera–less photographs bioglyphs are shown to be radically indexical. The third outcome is to show that, methodologically and interpretationally, bioglyphs have more affiliation with other artworks that are primarily indexical. This realignment of bioglyphs with other indexical art proposes a new category of art practice. This new category of indexical art, which foregrounds nature's events, suggests a method of art practice that is more supportive of reconstructive postmodern ideas."

(Daro Montag, 2000)

Montag, D. "Bioglyphs: generating images in collaboration with nature's events". PhD, University of Hertfordshire, 2000.

TAGS

art practice • bioglyph • camera-less • camera-less images • contemporary artcreative practice • disenchanted • ecological artists • icon • icon and index • iconic photographic images • iconicity • image making • image-making • index • indexical • indexical art • indexical images • interacting events • interpretation of nature • mechanistic interpretations • mechanistic modelnature • objectification • objectify • objectify the event • objectifying tendency • objectifying tendency of photography • phenomena • photographic form • photographic images • photographic materials • photographic methods • photographyreconstructive model • reconstructive postmodernism • theoretical contextthesisUniversity of Hertfordshireview of nature

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2011

The Island: Stephen Walter's London Series

"London is one of the great living palimpsests of our time. Its layers of history and its constant energy to re–invent itself fuels this vast grey magnet. I was spurd on by the great Map Makers of London's past – John Roque, Greenwood and Phyllis Pearsall (the originator of the A–Z). Informed by my own insights and knowledge, I combined further research on the Internet and through writers such as Peter Ackroyd and Ian Sinclair.

The resulting map, a spoof of the historical ones of old, would challenge the first impressions of its viewer; touching on the Capital's vastness, its secrets and its undercurrents. With this process in mind, I began to edit the information, keeping what I felt were historically important, interesting, relevant and amusing. These fantastical additions and epithets are purposefully innocent and acidic, trivial and serious. The Map is as much about the personality of its viewer than it is about of my own. In other words it acts as a mirror.

Britain is a collection of islands and it undoubtedly forms part of our identity. This provincialism; the centre of many industries and in particular the London Centric Art world and its rise again to a world city status add to its identity as an icon, separated from the rest of the country. I wanted to perceive London as another one of these 'islands', and so when mapping the coastline around its Borough edges I was happy to discover Carshalton Beaches coinciding with this border."

(Stephen Walter)

Fig.1&2 Stephen Walter, "The Island"

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TAGS

ancestral domainsancestral domainsborders • Carshalton Beaches • cartographycity mapscultural identitydrawing • epithets • everyday • fantastical additions • graphic representation • Greenwood • hand-drawn mapshistorical importancehistorical map • Ian Sinclair • icon • islands • John Roque • layers of history • London • London Centric Art • map makers • map of Londonmapmakingmapspalimpsest • Peter Ackroyd • Phyllis Pearsall • provincial • provincialism • secretspatial narrative • Stephen Walter • streetsubversion • The Island • UKundercurrentsurban centrevisual communicationvisualisationworld view

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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