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06 JULY 2013

XFR STN (Transfer Station) at the New Museum in New York

"The New Museum is accepting requests from the public for digital preservation of artist–produced moving image and born–digital content. Appointments for transfer and recovery are available from July 17 through September 8, 2013, transfers occur as part of the exhibition/lab 'XFR STN' ...

All moving image materials that are digitized as part of the exhibition will be made publicly available by the New Museum on the Internet Archive, a nonprofit institution whose mission includes offering 'free and open access to all the world's knowledge' and to provide permanent access for researchers, historians, scholars, people with disabilities, and the general public to cultural heritage collections. All artists submitting moving image materials will be able to download preservation–grade digital versions of their materials from the Internet Archive. Born–digital materials that are digitized as part of the exhibition can be made available by the New Museum on the Internet Archive at the artist's discretion. As part of 'XFR STN,' selections from the digitized content posted on the Internet Archive will be informally screened in the exhibition galleries."

Fig.1 Matthew Geller answering phones during the live call–in segment of Cara Perlman's End of the World show, produced for Potato Wolf, a project of Colab TV, ca. 1978

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TAGS

2013 • aging material • analogue and digital formatsanalogue mediaarchivingaudiovisualBetacam SPborn-digitalcompact disccultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigital artefactsdigital formatdigital heritagedigital preservationdigital video • digital videotape • digitisation project • digitisation services • early recording technologyfloppy diskInternet Archive • Iomega Jaz • Iomega Zip • media capture • media distributionmedia formatmedia past • media recovery • media storage • MiniDV • Monday/Wednesday/Friday Video Club • moving image transfer • MWF • New Museum of Contemporary ArtNew YorkNTSCobsolete mediumpreservation • preservation moving image materials • preserving the pastrecent past • Sony Hi8 • technology convergence • U-Matic • VHSvideo archivevideo artists • video transfer • videotape • visual arts • XFR STN

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Archaeology: graphic artefacts from our recent past

"Internet Archaeology seeks to explore, recover, archive and showcase the graphic artifacts found within earlier Internet Culture. Established in 2009, the chief purpose of Internet Archaeology is to preserve these artifacts and acknowledge their importance in understanding the beginnings and birth of an Internet Culture. We focus on graphic artifacts only, with the belief that images are most culturally revealing and immediate. Most of the files in our archive are in either JPG or GIF format and are categorized by either still or moving image, they are then arranged in various thematic subcategories. Currently, a major focus of Internet Archaeology is on the archiving and indexing of images found on Geocities websites, as their existence has been terminated by parent company Yahoo; who discontinued GeoCities operation on October 26, 2009. Internet Archaeology is an ongoing effort which puts preservation paramount. Unlike traditional archaeology, where physical artifacts are unearthed; Internet Archaeology's artifacts are digital, thus more temporal and transient. Yet we believe that these artifacts are no less important than say the cave paintings of Lascaux. They reveal the origins of a now ubiquitous Internet Culture; showing where we have been and how far we have come."

(Internet Archaeology)

Via Chelsea Nichols [http://ridiculouslyinteresting.wordpress.com/2011/11/26/internet–archaeology–the–best–of–90s–internet–graphics/]

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TAGS

1990s200920th century phenomenaaestheticsarchaeologyarchivearchiving • archiving and indexing • artefactcave paintingscultural codes • culturally revealing • cyber archaeologycyberculturedigital anthropologydigital artefactsdigital cultureemergence of the webGeocitiesGIF format • graphic artefacts • graphic artifacts • graphic designimagesindexindexingInternetinternet archaeologyinternet culture • JPG • JPG format • Lascauxnew mediaobsolescencepreservationrecent pasttransiencevisual designweb designweb pagesweb publishingYahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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TAGS

2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 APRIL 2011

The Digital Preservation Coalition: securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK

"The Digital Preservation Coalition was established in 2001 to foster joint action to address the urgent challenges of securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK and to work with others internationally to secure our global digital memory and knowledge base. Established as a not–for–profit membership organisation the coalition provides a mechanism by which members can work together to realise the opportunities of long term access."

(Digital Preservation Coalition)

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TAGS

2001accessarchivingbrokercultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigitaldigital artefactsdigital assetsdigital formatdigital heritage • digital memory • digital preservation • Digital Preservation Coalition • digital resources • DPC • global digital memory • knowledge basemedia artmedia pastnew medianot-for-profitobsolescenceold mediaorganisationpreservation • preservation of digital resources • preserving the pasttechnologyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2010

The preservation of Net Art in museums. The strategies at work

"The preservation of net art is a complex topic which requires the construction of a specific approach to look at internet artwork, one that takes into account the material dimension of the artwork. Preservation does not deal only with aesthetics, not only about the way the audience experiences artworks, but needs to have access to these types of information so the preservation process can take place.

This research presents an overview of works created by and for the Internet. The artworks which are described in this work are chosen specifically as examples for preservation purposes, and not according to a typology created for different purposes. This research also presents an overview of the institutions (based in Europe and in North America) that have developped specific preservation strategies. It takes the form of case analyses, which stem from observations, readings, and interviews.

This thesis also looks into the interaction between preservation and the other functions of the museum (collection, exhibition, research). Preservation cannot be tackled independantly, because it deals with the artwork's life cycle within the museum. Every art work has to be treated in a way which is specific to itself. The issue of notation also arises then, as it's necessary to find ways to describe artworks, especially as their technological environments will eventually be obsolete. This research explores the ways to compensate obsolescence : emulation, migration, score, re–interpretation, self–archiving, automatic archiving, etc (which can be also combined).

The attention to net art work as material socio–technical object means to find a way to look at those works : the code which composes the artwork, the files, its different files and the way they are organized, what happens on the screen, the interactions between the artward and the audience that experience it. The notions of code performativity and activation are useful in this approach.

Preservation happens only when value is attributed to what is preserved. Two categories of actors outside of the museum take part into this process : the art market on the one hand and art critics and art historians on the other. Both influence and get influenced by the museum.

All these elements allow the composition of a pluridisciplinar cartography on the topic of net art preservation."

(Anne Laforet)

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TAGS

archivearchivingartistic practiceartworkcartographycollectconstellationsconvergencecreative practicedigitaldigital cultureenquiryimmaterialInternetInternet artworkmedia artmuseumnet artnet-art.orgnew mediaobject • objectlessness • obsolescenceperformativityPhD • pluridisciplinar • pluridisciplinar cartography • preservationrepositorytechnologythesistypology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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