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Which clippings match 'Interface' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 MARCH 2011

The first graphical user interface using the desktop as a metaphor

"In 1973, the first graphical user interface was built at PARC, using the desktop as a metaphor. The UI introduced windows, icons, menus, file management, and tool palettes. Looking back at the first screenshots of this first GUI, the designs feel familiar even now. In 1974 PARC developed a What–You–See–Is–What–You–Get cut & paste interface, and in 1975 the demonstrated pop–up menus. The desktop concept was pushed quite a bit further by 1981 in the commercial Xerox Star PC interface, which was an important influence for the PC UI's created at Microsoft, Apple, NeXT, and Sun Microsystems in the 80's and 90's."

(Mike Kruzeniski, 17 February 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MAY 2010

We Feel Fine is an exploration of human emotion on a global scale

"Since August 2005, We Feel Fine has been harvesting human feelings from a large number of weblogs. Every few minutes, the system searches the world's newly posted blog entries for occurrences of the phrases 'I feel' and 'I am feeling'. When it finds such a phrase, it records the full sentence, up to the period, and identifies the 'feeling' expressed in that sentence (e.g. sad, happy, depressed, etc.). Because blogs are structured in largely standard ways, the age, gender, and geographical location of the author can often be extracted and saved along with the sentence, as can the local weather conditions at the time the sentence was written. All of this information is saved.

The result is a database of several million human feelings, increasing by 15,000 – 20,000 new feelings per day. Using a series of playful interfaces, the feelings can be searched and sorted across a number of demographic slices, offering responses to specific questions like: do Europeans feel sad more often than Americans? Do women feel fat more often than men? Does rainy weather affect how we feel? What are the most representative feelings of female New Yorkers in their 20s? What do people feel right now in Baghdad? What were people feeling on Valentine's Day? Which are the happiest cities in the world? The saddest? And so on.

The interface to this data is a self–organizing particle system, where each particle represents a single feeling posted by a single individual. The particles' properties–color, size, shape, opacity–indicate the nature of the feeling inside, and any particle can be clicked to reveal the full sentence or photograph it contains. The particles careen wildly around the screen until asked to self–organize along any number of axes, expressing various pictures of human emotion. We Feel Fine paints these pictures in six formal movements titled: Madness, Murmurs, Montage, Mobs, Metrics, and Mounds.

At its core, We Feel Fine is an artwork authored by everyone. It will grow and change as we grow and change, reflecting what's on our blogs, what's in our hearts, what's in our minds. We hope it makes the world seem a little smaller, and we hope it helps people see beauty in the everyday ups and downs of life."

(Jonathan Harris & Sep Kamvar, May 2006)

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TAGS

2005artworkbig data • blog entries • culturedatadata collection and analysisdata scrapingdatabase • demographic • depressed • everydayfeelinggeographical locationgraphic representation • happy • human emotion • human feelingsI am feeling • I feel • information aestheticsinformation graphicsinteraction designinteractiveinterfaceJonathan Harrismadnessmedia artmetrics • mobs • montage • mounds • murmurs • opinion miningparticle systemspatternpatterns of human behaviourphrase • sad • scrapesentiment analysisSep Kamvarvisual depictionvisualisation • We Feel Fine • weblog

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MARCH 2010

Siftables: cookie-sized interactive computers

"Siftables are our first product: sets of cookie–sized computers with motion sensing, neighbor detection, graphical display, and wireless communication. ...

Siftables act in concert to form a single interface: users physically manipulate them–piling, grouping, sorting–to interact with digital information and media. Siftables provide a new platform on which to implement tangible games."

(Sifteo Inc.)

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TAGS

2010applied research • Brent Fitzgerald • brickbusinesscommercialisation • David Merrill • devicedisplay deviceentertainmententrepreneurshipgestureHCIindustrial designinteractioninteraction designinteractive toyinterface • Jeevan Kalanithi • MITMIT Media LabNational Science Foundation • Siftables • Sifteo • tangibletangible computing • tangible games • technologyTED Talkstoyusabilityvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2009

Charmed: Tangible Virtual Life Simulation 2007

"The touch sensitive screens of Charmed offer intimate views into a virtual world accessed via three glowing resin pods. Each pod provides an entry point to inhabitants of suburban neighbourhoods, apartment buildings and city spaces. Within these highly evolved snow domes, a black and white linear aesthetic depicts a world populated by mesmerized figures carrying out the routine tasks required of their environments. Haptic gestures, like touching or tapping, provide a pathway into the spaces and a connection with the cultures, uncovering the diminutive details of the lives of these animated figures. Touching the screen can break the spell and provoke change. Repeated tapping can cause chaos, disrupting lives, forcing computers to malfunction and causing traffic accidents. Tapping can impact inhabitants, even causing a man to drink so much that the inevitable happens and he wets his pants. In Charmed each portal offers an impression of omnipotence as private lives and public spaces are exposed and controlled by our touch."

(Priscilla Bracks, Gavin Sade and Matt Dwyer)

Fig.1 Footage recorded by Gavin Sade and Priscilla Bracks at ISEA 2008, Singapore

Fig.2 Gavin Sade, Priscilla Bracks and Matt Dwyer. 'Charmed' ISEA 2008 Conference proceedings

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TAGS

2007artAustraliaExperimenta • Experimenta Playground • Gavin Sadeinteraction designinteractiveinterface • International Biennial of Media Arts • International Symposium on Electronic Art • ISEA • ISEA 2008 • Matt Dwyer • media arts • pod • Priscilla BracksrealitysimulationSingaporesocial agencytangibletouchurbanisationvirtual

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2009

Parody of MS Surface Promotion

"Sadly, with my current rate of savings I won't be able to afford the 10 grand sticker price until my kids are out of diapers and my wife and I are in them. So I decided to parody it instead."
('Doc', SarcasticGamer)

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TAGS

convergenceculture jammingdevicehaptic deviceinteraction designinteractive surfaceinteractive tableinterfaceiPhonemash-upMicrosoft SurfaceMS Surfaceparodypictures under glassremix culture • SarcasticGamer • tabletechnology • unimaginative use of new technology • usability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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