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Which clippings match 'Intercultural' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 OCTOBER 2012

Alain Resnais and Chris Marker's: Les Statues meurent aussi

"Les Statues meurent aussi, co–directed with Alain Resnais. This 30 minute short film has a chequered history of censorship that at one time elevated it to a somewhat mythical status (2), and which prevented it from being brought into the wider public eye until some 16 years after it was completed. After its first screening at the Cannes Film Festival in 1953, and in spite of winning the Prix Jean Vigo in 1954, Les Statues meurent aussi was banned in France by the Centre National de la Cinématographie between 1953 and 1963 owing to its controversial anti–colonialist stance (3). While a truncated version was made available in 1963, the unabridged film only became available in 1968.

Les Statues meurent aussi was commissioned by the literary review and publishing house, Présence Africaine, which was set up in 1947 in Paris as a quarterly literary review for emerging and important African writers. Founded by the Senegalese thinker Alioune Diop, it housed the writings of some of the most important francophone thinkers in the latter half of the 20th century, such as Aimé Césaire, Ousmane Sembene, Léopold Sédar Senghor, in addition to French metropolitan writers such as Jean–Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. The journal also translated groundbreaking works by Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka into French for the first time. Having emerged so soon after the new French Constitution of 1946 had declared a 'French Union', Présence Africaine's publications signalled a new, post–colonial status for French and francophone thought, embracing what was then a key notion: that of négritude (4). It is this notion that the second half of Les Statues meurent aussi engages with most deeply, and perhaps most controversially, especially as it strives to connect the death of the statue with the rise in the commercialisation of African art for the pleasure of the colonial classes. Indeed, it is against the backdrop of a France that had so recently lost its colonial power, but which still retained many of the quasi–Manichean distinctions between white, Western culture and black, African culture, that (and in spite of their claims to the contrary) Resnais and Marker's film projected its passionately anti–colonial, anti–racist, even anti–capitalist audio–visual collage. It is little wonder then that such a film should have been censored until the late 1960s, by which time it might have lost some of its topicality, but none of its political vigour."

(Jenny Chamarette, 14 September 2009, Senses of Cinema)

[1] Sarah Cooper, Chris Marker, Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2008. As Cooper points out, Les Statues meurent aussi is available as an extra on the French DVD release of Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, Arte France and Argos Films, 2004.

[2] See Roy Armes' entry on Les Statues meurent aussi in his The Cinema of Alain Resnais, A. Zwemmer/A.S. Barnes, London and New York, 1968, p. 34.

[3] This is heavily documented in scholarship on Marker and Resnais. In particular, see Cooper, p. 12; Emma Wilson, Alain Resnais, Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2006, pp. 22–4; Nora M. Alter, Chris Marker, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago, 2006, pp. 58–9.

[4] For further details see V.Y. Mudimbe (ed.), The Surreptitious Speech: 'Présence Africaine' and the Politics of Otherness, 1947–87, Chicago University Press, Chicago, 1992, pp. 3–4.

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TAGS

1953 • African art • African cultureAlain Resnaisanti-capitalism • anti-colonial • anti-colonialist • anti-racist • audiovisual • audiovisual collage • censorship • Centre National de la Cinematographie • Chris Marker • colonial classes • colonial powercommercialisationcritique • death of the statue • European imperialismfilmfilm essayFranceintercultural • Les Statues meurent aussi • negritude • post-colonial • post-colonialismpostcolonial • Presence Africaine • Senses of Cinema (journal)statue • Statues Also Die • Western culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MARCH 2012

Type that behaves: the prospect of autonomous type creatures

"From sketch to final creation for his Biotypography project, Oded [Ezer] wanted to create live, almost cinematic situations where these typo creatures 'act' and 'behave.' He says the most difficult part of the project was the issue of balance – where to draw the line between the insect and the letters.

Biotypography – typo art project depicting manipulated Hebrew and Latin 'Typo creatures.'

'When I saw an ant on the floor of my studio, I started to imagine what would happen if this was a creature half ant and half letter. Wouldn't it be wonderful if nature had invented letters? And then maybe different letter–ants could gather, create words and communicate with us!?'

'I could manufacture a medium wherein typography could develop and evolve into something completely different.'"

(WebUrbanist)

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TAGS

alphabet synthesisantautonomous • autonomous type • biotypography • Biotypography project • cinematic situations • create words • creaturecross-culturaldesign speculationevolutionevolveexperimental typeexperimental type designexperimental typographyexperimentationgraphic design • half ant • half letter • Hebrew • Hezi Leskly • insectintercultural • invented letters • Latin • letter-ants • letterform exercisesletters • manufacture a medium • nature • new forms of typography • Oded Ezer • primitive logicspeculative designsynthetic-lifetype • type that can act • type that communicates • type that gathers • types that behaves • typo art project • typo creatures • typographertypography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2009

So what's Rhiz.eu?

"An intercultural meeting place developed to give its members an easy and fun environment for communicating and collaborating with each other. It takes its name from a botanical term, rhizome, meaning 'a usually underground, horizontal stem of a plant that often sends out roots and shoots from its nodes' (Wikipedia): the term is used metaphorically in the social sciences and new media to describe social structures that are non–hierarchical, non–centralised, self–regulating, and formed peer–to–peer. Rhiz.eu was created by the European Cultural Foundation (ECF)"

Fig 1. Designed by Mina Žabnikar, Slovenia.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2008

Bank loses face over Brian the Sumo fake

"One of the world's biggest banks has been accused of 'cultural insensitivity' after dressing up an overweight white man to look like a sumo wrestler.

HSBC, which calls itself 'the world's local bank', is running a series of billboard and print advertisements featuring the wrestler alongside the slogan: 'Fixed savings rates that won't budge.'

The campaign has upset members of Britain's Japanese community, who claim that the man's skin tone has been darkened and that make–up has been applied that appears to narrow his eyes. The pseudo sumo – a model known only as Brian – has been given a Japanese–style wig and is dressed in a traditional mawashi belt.
...
Although HSBC has denied making the model look as if he is from 'a specific country or region', a spokesman admitted that make–up had been applied to his face and eyes and that his skin tone had been made to appear more tanned."

(Elizabeth Day, The Observer, UK, Sunday August 24 2008)

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TAGS

adadvertising • approximation • bankbillboardcultural codescultural practicecultural sensitivityculturedesignfakeHSBCidentityintercultural • overweight • representation • Sumo • UKvisual analogyvisual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Lynne Ciochetto
22 SEPTEMBER 2006

The Reflective Practitioner: Choreography As Research In An Intercultural Context

"Nevertheless, research which may be vital to the making of a dance work manifests itself differently from conventional research, both in outcomes and intent. Even artists who regard research as central to their practice still tend to view, as their ultimate goal, the artistic product – be it a dance, theatre or musical or hybrid performance, live or via another medium.

Reflective practice, by which I mean artistic practice as research, on the other hand, consciously explores and analyses connections between perception and action, experience and cognition. Although other research can be argued to do likewise, it may be relationships – between the parts and the whole, between form and content, between events and objects, between space and time – which makes artistic practice as research distinctive. Artistic practice as research also involves the presence of researcher/artist and researched/artists in a mutual collaboration and thus its nature is not only relational but emergent, interactive and embodied."

(Cheryl Stock, Queensland University of Technology, Australia)

CONTRIBUTOR

Mia Thornton
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