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Which clippings match 'Interactive Narrative' keyword pg.2 of 6
21 SEPTEMBER 2012

The History of Choose Your Own Adventure Story Fiction

"Choose Your Own Adventure's 'you' centered decision making, and exciting pace, has been cited as an influence in numerous games and media that followed the series. Examples of Choose Your Own Adventure's reference in the gaming world includes Japan's popular Bishoujo video games, which combine narratives with gameplay and mark the beginning of 'the trend in modern gaming toward using technology to allow players control over their stories... taking on characteristics of highly detailed Choose Your Own Adventure novels,' Choose Your Own Adventure is credited with partial responsibility for the heightened popularity of Role Playing Games, including Dungeons and Dragons. Other games which have been referenced as inspired by Choose Your Own Adventure include Mass Effect II which has a narrative–based adaptive difficulty setting where potential gameplay is altered by a player's decision–making early in the game and FormSoft's Adventure Player, a portable memory stick for PlayStation that allows players to build narrative–based games. The Interactive Fiction community has also credited Choose Your Own Adventure as being a major influence of their works."

(Chooseco LLC)

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TAGS

adventure game • Adventure Player (software) • Bishoujo (video games) • childrens bookschoose your own adventure • CYOA • decision makingdungeons and dragons • FromSoftware • game • game books • gameplaygamesinteractive fictioninteractive narrative • interactive stories • Mass Effect II (game) • memory stick • Memory Stick Duo • narrative-based gamesnovel • play novel • point of viewPSP • reluctant readers • role playingrole playing gamesstorystory-based experiencetheir storiesvideo game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 AUGUST 2012

Evocative Research in Art History and Beyond: Imagining Possible Pasts in the Ways to Heaven Project

"This article discusses a particular project that attempted to make art–historical research evocative as well as analytical by employing rich, interactive multi–media. This reliance on evocative material extended techniques practiced by television drama–documentaries and considered their legitimacy and potential within academic art history."

[...what might "evocative research" mean?]

3). Esche–Ramshorn, Christiane and Stanislav Roudavski (2012). "Evocative Research in Art History and Beyond: Imagining Possible Pasts in the Ways to Heaven Project", Digital Creativity, 23, 1, pp. 1–21

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TAGS

15th century • 16th centuryAHRC • Armenia • Armenian history • art history • Christian Orient • Christiane Esche-Ramshorn • Digital Creativity (journal) • Ethiopia • Ethiopian history • European Renaissance • evocative enquiry • evocative researchGeorge Lakoffilluminated manuscriptinteractive multimediainteractive narrativeinteractive storytellinginterpretation • Isaac Newton Trust • Janet Murray • microhistory • multifaceted • new historicism • new mediapractice-based researchrenaissancerepresentationresearch methodologyresearch methods • Stanislav Roudavski • theory building • Ways to Heaven • world history

CONTRIBUTOR

Stanislav Roudavski
13 OCTOBER 2011

An interactive system defines a virtual space

"An interactive system defines a virtual space, whether the system's interface provides access to the inhospitable planet of Stroggos or the Microsoft Windows desktop. Users of both these systems interact with a place, one created by a computer and in which users and computational agents carry out their individual and collective activities. The intuitive and often–discussed benefit of a well–designed interface metaphor is that it allows users to carry over conventions from their 'real' experience when performing tasks within the interface world.

Another key and often unarticulated value of an interface arises from the interface's mimetic quality. While mimesis is often discussed by narrative theorists as a contrast to diegesis, distinguishing the concepts of showing versus telling (Aristotle), my emphasis here is to distinguish between an artifact that is intended to be an imitation of something, but is not really that thing and an artifact that is intended to be mistaken as that thing. An example of the former case would be a film of a fictional account of the D–Day landing on the beaches of Normandy. An example of the later might be a virtual reality system displaying photo–realistic graphical images of a physical space. D–Days stories like The Longest Day and Saving Private Ryan are, in some ways, imitations, and so are more mimetic than VR systems whose design is intended to '...produce synthetic images visually and measurably indistinguishable from real world images.' (Greenberg 1999)(pg. 45)."

(R. Michael Young, 1999)

Greenberg, D. P. 1999. 'A framework for realistic image synthesis'. Communications of the ACM 42(8):45–53.

1). R. Michael Young (1999). 'Notes on the Use of Plan Structures in the Creation of Interactive Plot', Papers from the 1999 Fall Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Symposium

TAGS

1999 • AAAI • AristotleAssociation for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence • computational agents • conventionsD-Day landingdesktop metaphordiegesis • Donald P. Greenberg • fictional account • graphical images • image synthesis • imitation of something • imitations • interact with a place • interactive narrative • interactive system • interface metaphor • interface world • intuitiveMicrosoft Windowsmimesis • mimetic quality • mistaken as that thing • narrative theory • Normandy • performing tasks • photo-realistic • physical space • real experience • real world images • realism • Saving Private Ryan • showing • stories • Stroggos • synthetic images • telling • The Longest Day • usersvirtual heritagevirtual realityvirtual reality systemvirtual space • VR systems • WWII

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2011

Alternate Reality Game: Cisco GSX Virtual Global Sales Event

"For the 2nd straight year, Juxt Interactive and No Mimes Media have teamed up to craft a hit Alternate Reality Game (ARG) for Cisco Systems' Global Sales Experience, an annual gathering of more than 21,000 executives around the world.

Part action thriller, part treasure hunt, The Hunt storyline unfolded over the course of two weeks, turning thousands of Cisco employees into active players in an immersive adventure. Fictional characters came to life through social media, posting Facebook and Twitter updates to drive the story in real–time, sometimes engaging participants in one–on–one conversations. The experience also incorporated cinematic video clips, email correspondence, and phone messages, and utilized an array of Cisco tools that enabled employees to communicate across departmental, cultural and geographical boundaries.

In the end, participants were able to unravel the mysteries of The Hunt through collective problem solving, real–time data sharing, and seamless global collaboration, all made possible by Cisco technologies."

(Juxt Interactive and George P. Johnson, 2011)

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2010 • action thriller • active players • alternate reality gameARGchoose your own adventure • cinematic video clips • Cisco • Cisco GSX • Cisco Systems • Cisco technologies • collective problem solving • cultural boundaries • departmental boundaries • email correspondenceemployeesfictional characters • geographical boundaries • George P. Johnson • global collaboration • Global Sales Experience • GPJ • immersive adventureinteractive narrative • Inxpo • JUXT Interactive • multiple platforms • narrative transmedia entertainment experiences • No Mimes Media • one-on-one conversations • phone messages • real-time • real-time data sharing • social media • storyline • The Hunt • transmedia storytellingtreasure hunt • unravel the mystery • user experience design (UX) • virtual event • virtual meeting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Ensemble Logic: early experiments writing for hypertext

"Essays, email, poetics, directions, maps, images. ensemble logic is a seriously beautiful series of fragments that together make an 'ensemble' arrangement that revels in the pleasure of reading and writing. The publication is a chance to consider how writing for an electronic environment translates into (back–to) the book. Each fragment is marked with a location guide that allows the reader to easily find the complete work on the CDROM included with the book and on the web. The CDROM archives the complete eWRe site up to July 2000."

Electronic Writing Research Ensemble (2000). Ensemble Logic. T. Hoskin and S. Rob. Adelaide, South Australia.

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TAGS

2000 • Anne Robertson • Anne Walton • Australia • Bill Seaman • CDROMdigital multimedia • Dylan Everett • electronic media • electronic Writing Research ensemble • ensemble arrangement • ensemble logic • eWRe • fragments • Gregory L. Ulmer • Heather Kerr • hyperfiction • hypernarrativehypertextinteractive narrative • Jessica Wallace • Joanne Harris • Josephine Wilson • Katie Moore • Linda Carroli • Linda Marie Walker • link • Mark Amerika • Mark Stephens • Michael Grimm • net.artnonlinearon the web • pleasure of reading and writing • publication • Simon Rob • Sonja Porcaro • Sue Thomas • Suzanne Treister • Teri Hoskin • translation • writing for an electronic environment • writing for hypertext

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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