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Which clippings match 'Art Installation' keyword pg.1 of 3
29 FEBRUARY 2016

Tomás Saraceno: Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider’s Web (2008)

"In his dramatic installation Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider's Web (2008) Tomas Saraceno applied another analogy inspired by that finding: the comparison between our 'spongy' universe and a complex spider web in which groups of stars and other matter are strung like shining beads of water along invisible strands. Saraceno, a former architect known for following in the tradition of other maverick designers who have developed provocatively inventive projects with the goal of changing human behaviour and living conditions – such as Buckminster Fuller, Archigram and the Ant Farm group – also has a knack for presenting his conceptual projects in ways that capture the imagination."

(Kristin M. Jones, 2008, Frieze)

Jones, K. M. (2008). "Tomas Saraceno" Frieze(116).

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TAGS

2008 • airborne biosphere • alternate ways of living • analogyAnt Farm (architecture)Archigramart installationbiosphereblack and whiteBuckminster Fuller • capture the imagination • changing human behaviour • cloud formations • complex networks • conceptual projects • droplet • filament • Frieze (magazine) • galaxies forming • galaxy • inflatable biosphere • inventive projects • invisible strands • large scale workliving conditionsmaterials science • maverick designer • morphology of soap bubbles • network model • network morphology • neural networks • provocatively inventive • shining beads • soap bubbles • speculative models • spider web • sponge • spongy universe • stars • Tomas Saraceno • visual representations of mathematical conceptswaterweb of connectionswhite box

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 FEBRUARY 2016

Infinity Mirrored Room: The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away

"Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrored Room, a mirror-lined chamber housing a dazzling and seemingly endless LED light display, will be featured in the inaugural installation."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2014

The Visitor: Living by Numbers (2001)

Luc Courchesne (2001). 'The Visitor : Living by Numbers' immersive experience (reflexive Panoscope) work premièred at Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), August 2001.

"Interactive video panorama for computer with microphone and hemispheric projection system (Panoscope 360). Created with support from the Daniel Langlois Foundation for Art, Science and Technology, the International Academy for Media Arts and Sciences, the Canada Council for the Arts, Université de Montréal and the Société des arts technologiques (SAT). The original version is in English.

General description: The Visitor: Living by Numbers is inspired by Pier-Paolo Pasolini's 1969 film Theorema and by a dream Courchesne's daughter had when she was 10 years old. In the installation, visitors are planted somewhere in the Japanese countryside. From there they will try to make a life for themselves by saying any number between one and twelve to indicate the direction they want to go or to show interest in people and what they have to say. Exploring the territory, happening upon and entering a shelter, meeting and dealing with the inhabitants and gaining status within the group will define a visitor's experience. Leaving the place and the inhabitants to themselves (as in Pasolini's film) or being forced to escape after an earthquake (as in his daughter's dream) will further characterize the visitor's experience.

The experience starts in daytime, in the middle of rice fields just north of Ogaki-City in central Japan (Gifu Prefecture). In the inner garden of a low building, visitors will happen upon a woman preparing tea. This first encounter may lead to an invitation to diner where a mixed group of people (6) prepare and share a Japanese style stew (nabet). The diner is endless but conversations with dining partners may bring a visitor to spare moments in the intimacy of one's room where he or she is offered the host's mind and thoughts on different topics growing increasingly personal. In the process, a visitor builds a position in the group that either will have him invited to take more place among the group, or gradually ignored and abandoned.

Meanwhile, night has come and the risk of an unforgiving event in this earthquake prone area is more tangible. If such a thing was to happen, destroying the shelter and forcing everyone out, visitors would, depending on their status, be left behind or invited to join in the chaotic and confuse quest for a new place where every aspect of this group’s life will resume in the same way as if nothing had happened."

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2001 • Art Gallery of New South Wales Sydney • art installationAustraliaimmersive aesthetic experienceimmersive experienceinteractive artworkintimate interactionsintimate interfaces • Japanese countryside • Luc CourchesneSydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 DECEMBER 2013

Under Scan: interactive video art installation for public space

"Under Scan is an interactive video art installation for public space. In the work, passers–by are detected by a computerized tracking system, which activates video–portraits projected within their shadow. Over one thousand video–portraits of volunteers were taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham by a team of local filmmakers. For its London presentation in Trafalgar Square, Tate Modern filmed over 250 additional recordings. As people were free to portray themselves in whatever way they desired, a wide range of performances were captured. In the installation, the portraits appear at random locations. They 'wake–up' and establish eye contact with a viewer as soon as his or her shadow 'reveals' them. As the viewer walks away, the portrait reacts by looking away, and eventually disappears if no one activates it. ...

The piece was inspired by representation en abîme, where the portrayed make eye–contact with the viewer, – as found in works by Jan Van Eyck, Parmigianino, Velázquez or Leon Golub. Other references for this work include the post–photographic device described in La invención de Morel, written by Adolfo Bioy Casares (1940) and the ghostly portraits created by Gary Hill, Lynn Hershman–Leeson, Paul Sermon and Luc Courchesne."

(Rafael Lozano–Hemmer)

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2005 • Adolfo Bioy Casares • art installation • Bajo Reconocimiento • computerised surveillance system • DerbyDiego Velazquezeye contactfilming people • Francesco Mazzola • Gary Hill • ghostly portraits • ghosts • Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola • immersive experienceimmersive videointeractive installationinteractive video • interactive video art installation • Jan Van Eyck • La invencion de Morel • Leicester • Leon Golub • light installation • Lincoln • living picturesLuc Courchesne • Lynn Hershman-Leeson • mise-en-abyme • Morels Invention • Northampton • Nottingham • Pani 12kW projector • Parmigianino • Parmigiano • passer-by • Paul Sermon • post-photographic device • projection artprojection workspublic spaceRafael Lozano-Hemmer • representation en abime • robotic projectors • scissor lift • shadowTate Modern • The Invention of Morel • tracking system • Trafalgar Square • Under Scan (2005) • video artworkvideo portraitvideo projectionvideo projection worksvideo trackingwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2013

Dark Places: arts research exploring UK techno-scientific and industrial / military infrastructure

"Dark Places is part of the Overt Research Project, run by Office of Experiments.

This work was first shown publicly at the exhibition 'Dark Places' curated by Office of Experiments with John Hansard Gallery, Arts Catalyst and SCAN [http://www.scansite.org] in 2009–10. This site was publicly launched on 13th December 2010.

In developing the work for this exhibition, we imagined the construction of an alternative and experimental knowledge source that in turn maps all other sites of knowledge, as they exist in the UK Landscape. A 'Field Guide to Dark Places' is the first of these experimental resources, and aims to draw on and develop responses to the vast infrastructure of the techno–scientific and industrial / military complex, probing aesthetic, political and philosophical questions around spaces that are inaccessible or in some cases secret. (for reasons varying from simple understanding to physical and security issues – the performance as the writer Foucault would state of 'heterotopias').

Overall, the Overt Research Project is vast and so our aim was initially to start with an experience of physical sites within reach of John Hansard Gallery. Our research of these sites has led us to create experimental methods which in turn led to a number of installations, that can be seen by going to the John Hansard Gallery entry on this site (Southampton).

Whilst our own researchers, specifically Neal White and Steve Rowell, largely conducted research for the Dark Places Field Guide, our aim now is to extend the scale of this work by opening up this resource to enthusiasts, amateur scientists and urban explorers. If you would like to take part, we ask that you attend a physical event, as critical to our work is the link between the imaginary and the real – often confounded by pure virtual experience. We have run a number of events at which you can register to become an official Overt Researcher. These have most frequently included 'Critical Excursions'."

(Office of Experiments)

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2009 • aesthetic questions • alternative knowledge • amateur science • art exhibitionart installationart work • critical excursions • dark places • Dark Places (exhibition) • dark tourism • digital artsenthusiastsexperience projectexperimental knowledge • experimental research methods • experimental resource • field guide • Field Guide to Dark Places (resource) • heterotopiahuman experienceimaginary spaces • inaccessible spaces • industrial archaeology • interdisciplinary arts • John Hansard Gallery • landscapemapsMichel Foucaultmilitary complexmilitary hardwaremilitary historymilitary-industrial complexnational securityNeal White • Office of Experiments • Overt Research Project (ORP) • philosophical questionsphysical event • physical site • political questions • SCAN (agency) • secret town • security issues • sites of knowledge • South of EnglandSouthampton • Steve Rowell • techno-scientific • technoscience • The Arts Catalyst • UKurban explorerurban geographyvirtual experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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