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Which clippings match 'Russian Constructivism' keyword pg.1 of 2
15 FEBRUARY 2017

Silent-era avant-garde artist-filmmakers disrupting the new realities of mass media (rather than replicating them)

"Around the time Shub started her documentary experiments, 20th century avant-garde artists likewise began using repurposed chunks of mass-produced ephemera. Picasso and Braque threw bits of newspaper into paintings; Max Ernst cut up Victorian illustrations to create proto-surrealist collages; Walter Benjamin, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce pushed the literary practice of quotation into the realm of pastiche; Marcel Duchamp pioneered sculptural assemblage with his readymades; and photomontage blossomed in the graphic works of John Heartfield, Hannah Höch, and Alexander Rodchenko. These works rearranged reality to suit their artists' purposes but, unlike the compilation films, did not try to hide that manipulation. Whether Cubist, Dada, or Constructivist, these artists chose to disrupt the new realities of mass media rather than replicate them, savoring the illogic of dreamlike disjunctions and precipitating new ways to see all-too-common images."

(Ed Halter, 10 July 2008, Moving Image Source)

TAGS

20th centuryAlexander Rodchenkoavant-garde artistsavant-garde cinemaconstructivistcubismcut-up techniqueDadadisruptiondocumentary experiments • dreamlike disjunctions • Ed Halter • Esther Shub • experimental film • found-footage • Georges Braque • Hannah Hochinfluential artistsJames JoyceJohn Heartfield • literary practice • Marcel Duchampmass media • mass-produced ephemera • Max Ernst • new realities • Pablo Picassopastichephotomontagepioneering filmmaker • proto-surrealist collages • quotationreadymade • repurposed archival material • Russian constructivism • sculptural assemblage • Thomas Stearns Eliot • Victorian illustrations • Walter Benjamin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Josef Muller-Brockmann: the grid system and the golden ratio

"Muller Brockmann published several books, including The Graphic Artist and His Problems and Grid Systems in Graphic Design. These books provide an in–depth analysis of his work practices and philosophies, and provide an excellent foundation for young graphic designers wishing to learn more about the profession."

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Bauhaus Schoolclear communicationconsistencyDe Stijldesign formalismdesign principlesgolden ratiographic designergrid systemInternational StyleJosef Muller-Brockmannposter design • quantities • Russian constructivismSuprematism • Swiss International Style • Swiss Style • typographic consistency • University and Kunstgewerbeschule • visual communication • visual consistency • visual designvisual hierarchyvisual simplicitywhitespace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Kazimir Malevich: non-representational, non-painterly abstractions

"In the early twentieth century, Suprematism represented a leap into a totally non–representational, non–painterly, tarantella–like dynamic. Basic geometric shapes, isolated or in groups, were being energized, propelled into an optimistic ideal soaring from lower left to upper right, the vector alone suggesting time. The limits of perception and understanding are being questioned. An aura of simultaneous ecstatic concentration and idolatry of the will pervades these works.

Experienced 'in flesh,' these formidable abstractions look 'humanized': slight wavings in texture and color, the crackled paint of the Black Square on white, the subtlest of whites upon off–whites, transport the viewer into a higher, supremely charged, inspirational state of mind."

(Ileana Marcoulesco, Art Lies)

Fig.1 Kazimir Malevich (1915) "Black Circle", "Black Cross" and "Black Square"

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 OCTOBER 2011

Rodchenko's revolution: a socialist with true vision

"Painter, photographer, filmmaker, set designer, teacher, metalworker, [Alexander Rodchenko] revelled in the new freedoms thrown up by the Russian Revolution and was fiercely committed to liberating art for the masses.

Whether it was his blueprint for the ideal working man's club showcased at the Paris Exhibition of 1925, his illustrated covers for engineering manuals or his pioneering film poster for Sergei Eisenstein's classic Battleship Potemkin, Rodchenko's experimentation embodied the spirit of the early Soviet era.

But just as he thrived in the intellectual ferment of the Lenin years, like so many other artists–cum–revolutionaries of the period he was to fall foul of Stalin's increasingly paranoid and brutal regime.

Today his influence lives on, not only inspiring modern–day photographers like Martin Parr, but his designs are perhaps best known for the art school chic they afford to the covers of records by the Scottish indie band Franz Ferdinand."

(Arifa Akbar and Jonathan Brown, 2 January 2008, The Independent)

Alexander Rodchenko (1925). "Lengiz books on all subjects!"

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19252004Alexander Rodchenkoanimationart school • artist-cum-revolutionary • bandBattleship Potemkin (1925)design formalism • engineering manuals • figures in spacefilm posterfilmmakerFranz Ferdinandhomageidealism • illustrated covers • indie band • Joseph Stalin • liberating art for the masses • Martin Parr • metalworker • modernist aestheticsmotion graphicsmusic videopainter • Paris Exhibition • photographerphotomontagepioneeringposter design • record cover • regimerevisionRussian artistRussian constructivismRussian design • Russian Revolution • Scottishsequence designSergei Eisenstein • set designer • Soviet era • Take Me Out • typographyvisual communicationvisual designvisual literacyVladimir Lenin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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