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Which clippings match 'Futuristic Machines' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 JANUARY 2015

The Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini

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1981alien beings • alien writing system • anatomies • art book • bipedal creatures • bizarre games • bizarre imagerybizarre machines • bizarre vehicles • burial customs • Codex Seraphinianus (1981) • colour illustrations • delicate appearance • dining practicesdivergent conceptsencyclopaedia • fantaencyclopedia • fantastical science • fantastical worlds • funereal customs • futuristic machines • hallucinogenic • hand-drawn illustrationillustrated book • illustrated encyclopaedia • imaginary landscapesimaginary worlds • Italian artist • ludic intervention • Luigi Serafini • mutant scienceorganism • pencil illustrations • plant life • psychedelic imagery • senseless machines • speculative architecturespeculative biology • speculative chemistry • speculative physics • strange flowers • surreal landscape • surrealist illustration • weird book • writing system

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2014

REX: independent mobility through hands-free robotic exoskeleton

"Rex Bionics Plc (The Rex Bionics Group) is the global technology leader in robotic exoskeletons (REX). Uniquely, REX® provides independent mobility to wheelchair users and other mobility impaired persons using advanced robotic technology, custom–designed electromechanical actuators, precision engineering, and specialised networking systems.

The key differentiator of REX is the fact that it has been designed from the outset to provide mobility to non–ambulatory wheelchair users rather than as a means to enable otherwise fit individuals to lift supra–physiological loads, enhance endurance or aid mobility of those able to walk with crutches.

The device is designed to enable all users to stand and walk, and REX Personal™ users to scale stairs and navigate slopes."

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ambulatory disability • Aotearoa New Zealandapplied researchartificial limbbionicsbodycyborgdesign for disabilitydisability • electromechanical actuators • engineeringexoskeletonfuturistic machines • hands-free robotic exoskeleton • human body • independent mobility • intimate interfaceskiwi ingenuitylegslocomotionman machinemechanical engineeringmitigating impairmentmobility • mobility aid • mobility impaired • movingnew ways of being • paraplegic • physical engagementphysiologyproduct designprosthesisprosthetic leg • REX • Rex Bionics • Rex Bionics Group • Rex Bionics Plc • Richard Little • Robert Irving • robotic exoskeleton • robotic systemsrobotic technologyrobotics • Sophie Morgan • spinal cord injury • supraphysiological • thoracic vertebrae • walk • walkingwalking machine • wheelchair users

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JUNE 2013

Les Automates Jaquet-Droz

"Réalisé principalement par Pierre Jaquet–Droz, l'Ecrivain est le plus compliqué des trois mécanismes. Assis devant un pupitre, l'automate tient une plume d'oie qu'il trempe dans l'encrier, puis il la secoue légèrement avant de commencer de dessiner les lettres sur le papier. Grâce à un mécanisme annexe, ses yeux suivent son travail. L'Ecrivain est capable de tracer un texte de 40 signes au maximum, répartis sur quatre lignes. La principale invention de son mécanisme est le système de programmation par disque, qui lui permet d'écrire des textes suivis sans intervention extérieure. Il est également possible de lui faire écrire n'importe quelle phrase, lettre par lettre."

(Musée d'art et d'histoire de Neuchâtel)

[A robotic draftsman which is able to write through following a programmable sequence of letters.]

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1774 • 18th centuryandroidanimated modelsautomataautomation • clockwork • computer historydevicefuturistic machines • Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz • human-likehumanoid automatonindustrial heritageinteractive toy • Jean-Frederic Leschot • kinetic automaton • Les automates • mechanical beingmechanical engineering • Pierre Jaquet-Droz • programmable device • quill pen • robotsimulacrasimulationspeculative designSwitzerlandsynthesis machineswriterwriting machine

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2013

Machines replace humans: heavy metal robot 3-piece

"I'm impressed with Compressorhead – the three–piece robot band (three and a half if you count the little robot who drives one of the cymbals). I went to their website to see if I could discern the origins of the project, DIY, corporate, academic, or whatever and couldn't really find anything on the makers. Then I tracked down the drummer. Stickboy was created by Robocross Machines and a whimsical roboticist named Frank Barnes. ... Reminds me of the Survival Research Labs robot machines, built for public performance and disturbance."

(Maxwell Schnurer, 5 January 2013, Life of refinement)

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3-piece band • AC/DC • Ace of Spades • androidautomateautomationband • Compressorhead • computer controlled musical instrumentcybernetic artcymbals • disturbance • drummereffigyengineering • Frank Barnes • futuristic machinesGermanheavy metalhi-hathumanoid automatonindustrialisationkinetic automatonmachineman machinemechanism • metal band • MIDI • mohawke • Motorhead • musical instrumentplay • public performance • Robocross Machines • robot • robot band • robot machinesroboticrobotic artroboticistsimulationspeculative design • Stickboy • Survival Research Labs • TNT • whimsicalwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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