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Which clippings match 'Bodily Engagement' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 MARCH 2013

Toward a Theory of Social Practices: A development in culturalist theorizing

"This article works out the main characteristics of 'practice theory', a type of social theory which has been sketched by such authors as Bourdieu, Giddens, Taylor, late Foucault and others. Practice theory is presented as a conceptual alternative to other forms of social and cultural theory, above all to culturalist mentalism, textualism and intersubjectivism. The article shows how practice theory and the three other cultural–theoretical vocabularies differ in their localization of the social and in their conceptualization of the body, mind, things, knowledge, discourse, structure/process and the agent."

(Andreas Reckwitz, 2002)

Andreas Reckwitz (2002). "Toward a Theory of Social Practices: A Development in Culturalist Theorizing", European Journal of Social Theory; Vol.5, No.2; pp. 243–263 DOI: 10.1177/13684310222225432 [http://est.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/5/2/243]

TAGS

2002 • Andreas Reckwitz • Anthony Giddens • background practices • bodily engagementbodyCharles Taylor • conceptual alternative • conceptualisation • cultural-theoretical vocabularies • culturalist mentalism • culturediscoursediscourse and practice • European Journal of Social Theory • interpersonal interactions • intersubjectivism • knowledge • mental representations • Michel Foucaultmind • mind and body • Pierre Bourdieu • practice theory • shared understandingsocial agency • social and cultural life • social and cultural theory • social theory • textualism • theory of things • things

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

Laban Movement Analysis: qualitative aspects of nonverbal behaviour

"Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) originated in the work of Rudolf Laban, and has evolved into a highly detailed practical system that describes qualitative aspects of nonverbal behavior. In its current development, it operates as a phenomenology of movement and mind, as it requires that the observer look at the movement itself, prior to interpretation and without prejudice, while acknowledging the intrinsic connection between movement and subjective experience. Movement Analysis increases kinesthetic sensitivity for the observer, because it places in the foreground of the observer's experience, those aspects of movement which are individual–specific: that is, those movement choices which an individual makes within a particular context. Movement Analysis as a system of observation assumes that a significant degree of individual freedom in movement quality is always present within biological, cultural, and contextually defined bodily repertoires."

(Janet Kaylo)

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TAGS

attunementbodies in spacebodily engagement • bodily repertoires • body experiencechoreographycorporealdance performance • dance therapy • everyday movementexpressive repertoirefigures in spaceforensic detail • freedom of movement • intimacyintimateintimate movement • kinaesthetic sensitivity • kinesthetic • kinesthetic participation • kinetic exchange • Laban Movement Analysis • language for describing movement • LMA • movementmovement analysis • movement analysis methodology • movement and subjective experience • movement efficiency • movement experience • movement life • movement lives • movement performance • movement quality • movement vocabulary • nonverbal behaviourobservationpatterns of movement • phenomenology of mind • phenomenology of movement • physical presenceposturepuppetryreal-life • Rudolf Laban • seeing • seeing another • sensitivity to others • sensory abilitysubtlety • system of observation • theatre performance • therapeutic • understanding movementwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Elisza Ribeiro
18 JUNE 2011

MediaArtTube Exhibition 1.0: Biofeedback Art

"Biofeedback art is recently emerged interactive art form which applies technologies to capture biological changes of the body and create an artistic meaning through them. Biofeedback interfaces measures EEG, galvanic skin response, facial analysis, temperature analysis, eye–tracking or hearth rate in order to monitor the users bio–philosophical and produce a dynamic psychological/behavioural/emotion–based analysis of the person. The artistic meaning production based on the applications of these qualities which often deals with embodiment, enaction, body awareness, immersion or active/passive bodily engagement. There are a variety of tools can be used by artists which are usually divided to contact (for example EEG) or non–contact (facial analysis through camera). The MediaArtTube Exhibition 1.0 presents a collection of engaging art works and experiments in this hot topic of media art."

(MediaArtTube)

Fig.1 Brainloop interactive performance platform http://www.aksioma.org/brainloop/index.html

Fig.2 Yasushi Noguchi, Hideyuki Ando – Watch Me!, eye–responsive Installation 2009 http://r–dimension.xsrv.jp/projects_e/watch_me/

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TAGS

actuators • affective art • affective computing • affective environment • applied researchArs Electronica • art works • behavioural analysis • bio art • bio-philosophical analysis • bio-sensors • biofeedback • biofeedback art • biofeedback interfaces • biological changes • blood volume pressure • bodily engagementbodybody awareness • body data • brain • cognitive-based concept • communication devicecomputer interfaceconvergencecorrelative analoguecreative technologydata visualisationdevicedigital art • EEG • electroencephalography • electronic artembodied interactionsembodimentemotion research • emotion-based analysis • erotic ambiguity • external world • eye-trackingfacial analysis • galvanic skin response • graphic representationHCI • heartbeat • hearth rate monitor • humidity • hybrid art • immersioninformation aestheticsinteraction designinteractive artinteractive media artinteractive performanceinteractive visualisationinterface artinterface designkinetic artman machinemeasurementmedia art • MediaArtTube • micro-bio-electrochemical systems • micro-electromechanical • mobile phonenew media artpsychological analysispulse • responsive environment • robotrobot artscreen-based interface • skin conductivity • smell • stroke • sweat • tangible biofeedback • tangible interfacetechnology-based arttemperature analysis • tickle • time-based art • ventilators • vibrationvibratorvirtual realityvirtual worldvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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