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Which clippings match 'Installation' keyword pg.1 of 8
18 JANUARY 2013

Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art

"Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD–Rom, DVD–Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth–century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD–Rom. A novel research archive of international significance, the collection complements the holdings in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections of illuminated manuscripts and the early modern printed book, and adds to the breadth of its important collections in human sexuality, Asian Studies, and Media, Film, and Music."

(Cornell University Library)

TAGS

2002American • American new media arts • archiveart • catalogues • CD-ROMChinese • Chinese new media arts • cinemacollection • commercialisation of mass media • Contact Zones • Cornell UniversityCornell University Library • designs • digital interfaces • DVD-ROMfilmholdingsinstallation • international art • InternetInternet artmass mediamediamonographs • multimedia artworks • musicnet artnew media artnew media artsonline and offlinephotography • Professor Rose Goldsen • research archive • resource guides • soundspecial collections • Timothy Murray • twentieth-century developments • unpublished manuscripts • video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2012

Boundary Functions: personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control

"Boundary Functions shows us that personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control. ...

By projecting the diagram, the invisible relationships between individuals and the space between them become visible and dynamic. The intangible notion of personal space and the line that always exists between you and another becomes concrete. The installation doesn't function at all with one person, as it requires a physical relationship to someone else. In this way Boundary Functions is a reversal of the lonely self–reflection of virtual reality, or the frustration of virtual communities: here is a virtual space that can only exist with more than one person, and in physical space.

The title, Boundary Functions, refers to Theodore Kaczynski's 1967 University of Michigan PhD thesis. Better known as the Unabomber, Kaczynski is a pathological example of the conflict between the individual and society: engaging with an imperfect world versus an individual solitude uncompromised by the presence of others. The thesis itself is an example of the implicit antisocial quality of some scientific discourse, mired in language and symbols that are impenetrable to the vast majority of society. In this installation, a mathematical abstraction is made instantly knowable by dynamic visual representation."

(Scott Snibbe, 1998)

Fig.1 Scott Snibbe (1998). "Boundary Functions".

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TAGS

1998art installationboundariesboundary functionsdynamic visual representationdynamically changingfloorgeometryindividualindividual and society • individual solitude • installationinteraction patternsinteractive artinteractive floorinteractive projection • Jonathan Shewchuk • linesmathematical abstractionmathematicspartition of spacepatternpatternspersonal spacephysical interaction • physical relationship • physical spaceprojected from overhead • proxemics • psychology • regions • relationships between individuals • scientific discourse • Scott Snibbesocial interaction • social relationships • Theodore Kaczynski • unabombervideo trackingvirtual spacevoronoiVoronoi diagram

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 APRIL 2012

William Forsythe: choreography as a reflection of social spheres

"In his installation performances such as Human Writes or Heterotopia, to which Forsythe has dedicated an increasing amount of his time in recent years, choreography becomes a social practice. Forsythe's installations are controlled test arrangements in which all the participants can observe themselves, their bodies and their movements together. When a performance like Human Writes deals in substance with the difficulties surrounding universal human rights, it becomes clear where the potential of dance and movement can lie. After all, it's not abstract universal laws alone that guarantee our co–existence. It is much more our physical actions, our daily movements that create and shape the community. Herein lies the political meaning of Forsythe's notion of dance. He creates spaces where he places people in a new, unknown relationship to themselves so that they reflect differently on their (social) spheres and in so doing explore their own potential scope for action."

(Gerald Siegmund, May 2008, Goethe–Institut)

Fig.3 Dominik Mentzos, "Human Writes", performance–Installation by William Forsythe and Kendall Thomas [http://www.theforsythecompany.com/pressphotos/humanwrites/].

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TAGS

abstract universal laws • ballet • bodies • choreography • co-existence • community • confrontational • controlled test arrangements • create and shape • creative problem solvingcritique • daily movements • danceDominik Mentzosdrawdrawing • emplacement • experimentationGoethe-Institutheterotopiahuman rights • Human Writes (performance) • installation • installation performance • language of ballet • movementnomologicalparticipantsperformancephysical actions • political meaning • potential for action • relationshipssocial actionsocial changesocial practices • social spheres • space • the potential of dance and movement • universal human rights • universal laws • William Forsythe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 FEBRUARY 2012

The 2012 Kinetica Art Fair: Intuition and Ingenuity

"The Kinetica Art Fair brings together independent galleries, art organisations and curatorial groups who focus on kinetic, electronic, robotic, sound, light, time–based and multi–disciplinary new media art, science and technology. The art fair features installations, robots and small sculptures but also live performances, artists presentations, demos and a cheerful atmosphere that makes it easy to talk to the 'exhibitors. ...

Kinetica is as bazaar, as garage and as male–frequented as you might expect. There were a couple of interactive horrors 'customizable to better suit the lobby of your luxury hotel', and a few aesthetically questionable contraptions. It takes all sorts, as they say. ...

A corner of the fair was dedicated to Intuition and Ingenuity, an art exhibition that pays homage to Alan Turing.'"

(Regine, 26 February 2012, We Make Money Not Art)

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TAGS

2012Alan Turingart exhibition • art fair • art organisations • artist presentations • contraptions • curatorial groups • demos • drawingelectronic artengineeringexhibitors • garage aesthetics • homage • independent galleries • ingenuityinstallation • interactive horrors • intuitionkinetic artKinetica Art Fairlight artlive performance • male-frequented • mark makingmulti-disciplinarynew media artquasi autonomous creaturesrobotrobotic artscience and technologysmall sculpturessound art • time-based • We Make Money Not Art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2011

Rien a Cacher Rien a Craindre

"As the first artists in residence at la Gaîté lyrique in Paris, UVA created Rien a Cacher / Rien a Craindre, a series of responsive light and sound installations that together seduced and unsettled visitors in a unique way.

Exploring the unexamined assumption that digital technology is moving us towards utopia, UVA created a visitor experience simultaneously celebrating and critiquing the brave new world of the digital.

Over 14.000 people saw the installation over six days from 1–6 March 2011."

(United Visual Artists)

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TAGS

2011artist in residenceassumptionsbrave new worlddigital technologydigital world • Gaite lyrique • installationlightlight artlight installationlight sculptureParisresponsive light installationresponsive sound installation • Rien a Cacher • Rien a Craindre • sound installationspectacleUnited Visual Artists • unsettling • utopia • UVA • visitor experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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