Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Architect' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

1

2

TAGS

19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 APRIL 2013

Lebbeus Woods: Visionary Architect

"Lebbeus Woods, Architect", February 16 – June 02, 2013, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

"Architect Lebbeus Woods (1940–2012) dedicated his career to probing architecture's potential to transform the individual and the collective. His visionary drawings depict places of free thought, sometimes in identifiable locations destroyed by war or natural disaster, but often in future cities. Woods, who sadly passed away last year as planning for this exhibition was under way, had an enormous influence on the field of architecture over the past three decades, and yet the built structures to his name are few. The extensive drawings and models on view present an original perspective on the built environment – one that holds high regard for humanity's ability to resist, respond, and create in adverse conditions. 'Maybe I can show what could happen if we lived by a different set of rules,' he once said. SFMOMA has collected Woods's work since the mid–1990s, amassing the broadest collection of his work anywhere; the exhibition will feature these holdings, as well as a selection of loans from institutional and private collections."

(San Francisco Museum of Modern Art)

1

2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2009

Body>Data>Space: Canary Wharf Waterfall

"Building Design Magazine (BD) has published an article by Elaine Knutt discussing the potential for telematic experiences to be constructed in public spaces by the use of interactive architectural surfaces. Telematics (tele–communication and informatics) broadly explores how communication has transformed our experience of social connectivity and new emergining patterns of communication and power structures.

Thanks to this article I was pleased to find out about a new group of artists and architects called bodydataspace ( b>d>s) created by Ghislaine Boddington and Armand Terruli who are exploring 'the integration of interactive and body–intuitive interfaces into public sites. Bodydataspace have proposed that Canary Wharf, London's tallest building 235m, have a giant projected waterfall cascading down its facade. The waterfall would not be a computer generated animation but a real–time projection of Angel Falls in Venezuela. the world's highest free–falling waterfall at 979m."
(Ruairi Glynn, Interactive Architecture dot Org)

1

TAGS

architectarchitectureartblogcityderivedigitaldigital architectureearth arteco artinstallationinteractive architecture • interactive architecture workshop • London • medialab arts • naturalnaturephysicalpsychogeography • Reciprocal Space • Ruairi Glynnscalespace • submerge innovation • telematic experiencetelematicsUKurbanismvirtualwaterweblog

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
09 NOVEMBER 2004

Iannis Xenakis: Renaissance Figure

Iannis Xenakis is one of the most important composers of the 20th century. His works span every media and numerous approaches, electronic and acoustical, from orchestral to electroacoustic to multi–media. Also a mathematician, experimental engineer and architect, theoretician, educator, and author, Xenakis is a true renaissance figure.

1

TAGS

acousticarchitectauthorcomposereducatorelectronicengineeringexperimentalIannis Xenakis • mathematician • music composer • theoretician
20 JANUARY 2004

Freemason: Secular Architect Shaping The World

"Freemasonry was founded around the image of the secular architect shaping the world and himself within it so as to provide both with a sense of moral order. Stonemasons, forerunners of modern architects, not only provided the symbolic tools :this reshaping process, but because of their past, particularly their association with the building of the great cathedrals in Europe, supplied the link with religious certainty and order. But it was the building of Solomon's Temple which was the central myth of freemasonry. It embodied spatially a utopic of moral order in which individuals might lead a virtuous life and come to create the social conditions of trust required in the contractual society that was emerging around them. Freemasons devoted considerable energy to seeking out their origins of their craft in the ancient world, notably associated with the great feats of architecture down the ages. Freemasons were imputed to have been involved in almost every architectural feat in history, right back to Noah and his ark and including on the way the construction of Solomon's Temple and the Tower of Babel."

(Kevin Hetherington, 1997, p.87)

Hetherington, K. (1997). "The Badlands Of Modernity: Heterotopia And Social Ordering". London: Routledge.

Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.