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Which clippings match 'Business Management' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 OCTOBER 2014

Fredrick Winslow Taylor and the Myth of Efficiency

"[Fredrick Winslow] Taylor sought to precisely measure the movements of factory workers and their timings to make them as efficient as humanly possible. This made him beloved by executives and detested on the factory floor, and it also made him one of the world's first management consultants. In a recent article in The New Yorker, 'Not So Fast,' the historian Jill Lepore takes a hard look at Taylor and his claims for scientific management. According to new research, he was a better salesman than consultant. Many of his facts were made up, and most of his results never materialized. We now know that Lillian Gilbreth, an early proponent of scientific management, had serious doubts about the movement she helped proselytize.

All this is important because Taylor, with his system of scientific management, was the father of efficiency. From scientific management we get the lust for efficiency in business. It became part of the dogma of business schools, almost none of which existed before his time. Business schools from their earliest days have promoted efficiency and the handling of business as something like industrial engineering. From operations to finance, from marketing to sales, business school education has focused on narrowing problems, identifying resources and working to get the most out of the least."

(Adam Hartung, 16 October 2009, Forbes)

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TAGS

20th century • Adam Hartung • business education • business efficiency • business growth • business inertia • business leaders • business leadership • business management • business school education • business schools • Clayton Christensencompetitive advantagecost-cutting • cultural myth • customer demand • customer satisfactiondehumanisationdisruptive innovationdogmaefficiency • efficiency in business • factory floor • factory workerForbesFordismFrederick TaylorGary Hamel • history of technology • ideationincremental improvementsincremental innovationindustrial engineering • innovation resources • Jill Lepore • legacy businesses • Lillian Gilbrethman machine • management consultant • manufacturingmanufacturing industries • measuring movement • order and control • organisation leadership • organisational problems • price wars • products and services • Rakesh Khurana • scientific management • taylorism • The New Yorkerwaste prevention • what organisations do

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 DECEMBER 2013

Ways of Thinking and Organisational Causality

"There are several types or ways of thinking. Each of these ways of thinking comes with its own set of assumptions, or paradigms, that, while making the thinking process work efficiently, also constrains the process to a particular view of causality, organization, and management's and members' roles in an organization. These types of thinking have their roots in natural sciences, social sciences, and philosophies. They can become so pervasive and dominant in management discourse that they become invisible, being applied without consideration for their assumed causality. Clearly identifying and classifying types of thinking raises awareness of what thinking is actually taking place, and at the same time challenges management to improve their thinking based on this knowledge of thinking."

(Kim Korn, Create Advantage Inc.)

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TAGS

analytical thinking • assumed causality • autonomous human choice • business management • business organisation • causalitycompetitive advantage • competitive positioning • complex responsive processes thinking • complexity science • decision making • formative causality • Georg Hegel • Hegelian philosophy • holistic thinking • identity-difference thinking • imaginative thinkingImmanuel Kant • inside-out thinking • insightintuitionIsaac Newton • Kantian philosophy • knowledge of thinking • knowledge paradigm • management discourse • mechanistic perspective • natural causality • natural sciences • natural systems • organisation causality • organisation evolution • organisational behaviourorganisational capabilities • organisational causality • organisational dynamics • outside-in thinking • part-whole thinkingphilosophypsychological perception • rational choice thinking • rationalist causality • rationalist perspectiverationalist traditionsocial sciencestrategic thinkingsynthetic thinking • system-environment thinking • systemic process thinking • systemic thinking • systems approach • systems science • systems thinking • thinking roles • thinking styles • transformative causality • types of thinking • ways of thinking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2013

Project Management and Business Analysis Guides

"The Project Service Centre (PSC) role within CSU is to establish sound Project Management (PM) principles throughout the organisation. This will provide a means of clearly identifying the true needs of the University and help facilitate those desired outcomes.

To achieve these objectives, the PSC must provide and enhance the methodology for project management and business analysis, including guides and templates. This particular section concentrates on a set of guides which recommends how different processes can be undertaken."

(Charles Sturt University)

TAGS

enefits analysis • brainstormingbusiness analysisbusiness analystbusiness communicationbusiness logicbusiness management • business process modelling • Charles Sturt University • conducting meetings • cost estimatedecision makingdocument analysis • echnical specification • elicitation practices • elicitation process • engineering process • financial analysis • focus group • functional decomposition • gathering requirements • interface analysis • interviewingmodelling and prototyping • needs analysis • PowerPoint lectureproblem-solvingproject managementprototypingquestionnaire • requirements analysis • requirements elicitationrequirements engineeringrequirements gatheringrequirements process • requirements workshop • reverse engineeringrole playingshared practicessoftware engineering • stakeholder interviews • surveysystem requirementsuse casesuser activity data • user observation • workshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2011

Imperial College London: the future of digital services

"The Digital Economy Lab acts as a portal for all the research, teaching and engagement which is taking place within this grand challenge at Imperial College London. The Digital Economy Lab aims to link external organisations to relevant expertise at the College and to foster the growing digital community within the College so that they can work together more effectively.

Launched in September 2010, the Lab has been gaining momentum already through a number of engagements with firms, lectures and the launch of the Digital Business pathway as part of Imperial College Business School's Masters in Management course. A programme of research is currently ready to be launched, building on the many existing projects which are showcased on this website."

(Imperial College London)

TAGS

2010applied researchbusiness management • business school • digital business • digital community • digital economy • Digital Economy Lab • Digital Economy Laboratory • digital services • Future of Digital Services • Imperial College Londoninnovationknowledge-based economy • liveable cities • Masters in Management • new digital services • novel digital services • online brainstorming initiative • researchresearch centreresearch programmeresearch projectsSME • technologies of engagement • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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