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Which clippings match 'Self-esteem' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 OCTOBER 2015

Is competition good for learning? Exploring ipsative assessment as an alternative

"Ipsative assessment is a powerful and under-used approach that provokes a radical rethink of the purposes and methods of assessment. Ipsative assessment means making comparisons with a learner's previous work to mark progress and enable learners from all backgrounds to achieve a personal best. The seminar presents a case for partially replacing competitive assessment with ipsative assessment in a dual systems approach, and it explores the possibilities and the challenges using research evidence and examples from case studies in the recently published book Ipsative Assessment: Motivation through marking progress by Gwyneth Hughes."

(Gwyneth Hughes, 07 October 2014)

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2014 • all learners can succeed • Amanda West • assessment for learningassessment techniques • attainment • Carol Dweckcomparison with previous performance • competition and performativity • competitive assessment • conference presentation • Diane Reay • Dylan Wiliam • George Madaus • grading against external standards • Graham GibbsGwyneth Hughesimprovement against past performance • instrumental conditioning • instrumental learning • ipsative assessment • learning and attainment • learning and development • learning and teaching • learning not outcomes • learning pathways • learning process • marking progress • marks and performance • measuring individual performance • Miriam David • motivational needsmotivational theory • Patricia Broadfoot • Paul Black • performance metricsperformativitypersonal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvementRichard Sennettself-esteem • self-referential assessment • Stephen Ball • student achievement • Sue Bloxham • unequal access

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2015

Sexting becoming the norm for teens: advice for parents

"A new campaign which aims to give parents the tools to deal with their children sexting is being launched by the National Crime Agency's CEOP Command. The campaign tackles the issues which arise from young people sending self-generated nude or nearly nude images and videos – commonly known as sexting."

(UK National Crime Agency, 15 June 2015)

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20152D animationad campaignadolescents • blackmail • body awarenessbody politics • Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) • child protection • cyber crime • digital youthdisplay of sexualitygraphic sex actsidentity performancein real life (IRL) • information for parents • internet saftey • National Crime Agency (NCA) • National Cyber Crime Unit (NCCU) • nearly nude images • normalising over-sharing • online protection • oversharing • photo sharing • posting images • posting onlinepractical advicepsychosocial maturationpublic service announcement • revealing images • risquesafety educationself-esteemselfiesextingsexual depictionssexualised depictionssocial consequencesspectacular society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JULY 2014

A Feminist Analysis of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty

Abstract: "Drawing from several areas of research, this thesis explores the ways in which Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty appropriates feminist themes to sell beauty products, to the detriment of female consumers. Advertising and marketing have long held the power to create, shape, and reinforce cultural norms, and for years, advertisers have been able to propagate and strengthen gender stereotypes. Though there has been a push since the late 1990s to stem the flow of sexist and potentially dangerous advertising messages about women's bodies, ads still disseminate harmful messages that contribute to the further sexualization and oppression of women in the United States. Dove is just one of the many female–targeted brands that claim to hold progressive, woman–positive ideals, while still selling products intended to make women more beautiful–supposedly the ultimate goal for any modern female. While the campaign professes a desire to increase confidence and self–esteem for women and girls around the globe, it promotes a post–feminist, consumerist agenda that actually reinforces what Naomi Wolf titled 'the beauty myth'. Linguistic and visual analyses of Dove's print and viral marketing tactics within the contexts of advertising, feminism, and consumer culture reveal that instead of 'redefining' beauty, the Dove campaign is, in actuality, reinforcing decades–old ideology about women's appearance and status in society."

(Caitlin McCleary, 2014)

McCleary, Caitlin M., "A Not–So–Beautiful Campaign: A Feminist Analysis of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty" (2014). University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects. http://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_chanhonoproj/1691

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2013advertising campaignanxietyappropriationbeauty industrybeauty productsbody imageco-optionconsumer culturecultural normsdepictions of womendissertationDove (brand) • Dove Real Beauty Sketches (2013) • drawingemotional responseemotive manipulationempowerment themeevocative advertisingfemale consumerfemale-targeted brandsfeminist analysisfeminist themesgender stereotypesgendered brands • honours thesis • marketing campaign • Naomi Wolf • physical appearancepost-feminist agenda • real beauty • Real Beauty (campaign) • redefining beauty • self-criticism • self-esteemself-perceptionsexualisation • sketch artist • sketching • The Beauty Myth (1990) • Unilever • University of Tennessee • viralviral adviral advertisingviral marketing tactics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

How would it feel to be represented by someone like Tony Abbott?

"Every week Tony Abbott makes another comment that reveals very concerning social views. Commentators blow them off as 'gaffes', but this isn't about gaffes. It's about values. It's about our national character if our Prime Minister labels refugees who seek our help as 'illegal', even as they exercise their legal, human right to flee danger. It's about the message we send to young gay and lesbian Australians, if our Prime Minister talks about their equality as a 'passing fashion,' and what that does to their self–esteem. It's about our values if a Prime Minister talks to 'the housewives of Australia as they're doing their ironing,' says his colleagues are 'not just a pretty face' and have 'sex appeal' and calls on his opponent to 'make an honest woman of herself'. Prime Ministers reflect our national values, and have the power to change them radically. Does what Tony Abbott says matter? Well, in 17 days he wants to be speaking for all of us. That's why GetUp members are launching this ad. Will you be part of it?"

(GetUp!)

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2013 • abortion rights • Australia • Australian Federal Government • Australian GovernmentAustralian Liberal Partycasual homophobiacivil libertiesconservativeconservative attitudesconservative catchphrasesequality • gaffes • gayGetUp!governancehousewifehuman rightsIndigenous Australiansintoleranceironinglesbianmisogyny • national character • national values • personal valuespoliticsPrime Ministerquoterefugeeself-esteemsexist languagesocial conservatismsocial responsibility • social views • Tony Abbott • values

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2012

Australian cultural policy: a model for the UK

"Last November I visited Australia and the arts community was buzzing with talk about the country's proposed new cultural policy. So I took a look at the discussion document and I turned green with envy – why can't we have one of these in the UK?

In Britain we've never been good at framing a coherent approach to culture. Back in 1996 a senior civil servant at the Department for National Heritage told the Sunday Times: 'It is not part of our culture to think in terms of a cultural policy,' and not much has changed.

The Australian example shows what can be done. It's a remarkable and mercifully brief document that has many virtues.

First, it sets out the beliefs on which any serious cultural policy must be founded: 'The arts and creative industries are fundamental to Australia's identity as a society and nation, and increasingly to our success as a national economy.' It adds that 'the policy will be based on an understanding that a creative nation produces a more inclusive society and a more expressive and confident citizenry.'

Everything that follows in the document is built on this bedrock of ideology. Without such clear and transparent beliefs, and the commitment that flows from them, policies are doomed to endless wrangling about measurement and evidence.

But the document does acknowledge evidence where it exists, and uses it wisely. For example: 'Research shows that arts education encourages academic achievement and improves students' self–esteem, leading to more positive engagement with school and the broader community and higher school retention rates' – therefore 'the new national curriculum will ensure that young Australians have access to learning in the creative arts.'

But in the UK we have to suffer the non–evidence based approach of abolishing what went before just because the other lot invented it.

The next virtue is that the proposed policy not only encompasses the arts, heritage and creative industries, but extends into other areas like education and infrastructure. Culture is deemed relevant to every department of government, from the role that it plays in international relations (British Foreign and Commonwealth Office) to its economic importance (HM Treasury), from its impact on the need to build airports for cultural tourists (Department for Communities and Local Goverment) to cultural scholarship in Higher Education (Department for Education).

That relevance is a two–way street: for example, the cultural uses of high speed broadband affect hard infrastructural requirements, while the existence of the hardware creates cultural opportunities."

(John Holden, Monday 6 February 2012)

Fig.1 Australia's 1988 Bicentennial $10 Note.

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academic achievementaccess to learningarts • arts and creative industries • arts communityarts educationarts policyAustralia • Australian example • beliefs • British Foreign and Commonwealth Office • coherent approach • confident citizenry • creative artscreative industriesCreative Nationcultural identity • cultural opportunities • cultural policy • cultural scholarship • cultural tourism • cultural uses • Department for Communities and Local Goverment • Department for Education • Department for National Heritage • evidence based policy • expressive citizenry • heritage • high speed broadband • higher education • HM Treasury • ideology • inclusive society • infrastructural requirements • measurement and evidence • national curriculumnational economy • positive engagement • self-esteem • society and nation • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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