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Which clippings match 'Archigram' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 FEBRUARY 2016

Tomás Saraceno: Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider’s Web (2008)

"In his dramatic installation Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider's Web (2008) Tomas Saraceno applied another analogy inspired by that finding: the comparison between our 'spongy' universe and a complex spider web in which groups of stars and other matter are strung like shining beads of water along invisible strands. Saraceno, a former architect known for following in the tradition of other maverick designers who have developed provocatively inventive projects with the goal of changing human behaviour and living conditions – such as Buckminster Fuller, Archigram and the Ant Farm group – also has a knack for presenting his conceptual projects in ways that capture the imagination."

(Kristin M. Jones, 2008, Frieze)

Jones, K. M. (2008). "Tomas Saraceno" Frieze(116).

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2008 • airborne biosphere • alternate ways of living • analogyAnt Farm (architecture)Archigramart installationbiosphereblack and whiteBuckminster Fuller • capture the imagination • changing human behaviour • cloud formations • complex networks • conceptual projects • droplet • filament • Frieze (magazine) • galaxies forming • galaxy • inflatable biosphere • inventive projects • invisible strands • large scale workliving conditionsmaterials science • maverick designer • morphology of soap bubbles • network modelnetwork morphology • neural networks • provocatively inventive • shining beads • soap bubbles • speculative models • spider web • sponge • spongy universe • stars • Tomas Saraceno • visual representations of mathematical conceptswaterweb of connectionswhite box

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2013

Superstudio: the radical Italian architectural group

"The collective emerged in 1966 at the moment when the technocratic optimism of the first half of the 1960s was souring. The watershed was the beginning of the Cultural Revolution in China in 1966 when Mao Tse–tung gave Western intellectuals a new cause to believe in after a decade of disillusion since their faith in communism was shattered by Khrushchev's exposure of Stalin's brutalities. Events in China made Western society seem spiritually barren at a time of growing concern about the Vietnam War. In the visual arts, radicals rebelled against the extrovert imagery of Pop Art in favour of the politically engaged work of Fluxus artists like Joseph Beuys and Nam June Paik. The rising tide of political frustration culminated in the 1968 student riots in Paris and copycat protests in London, Tokyo and Prague. Women formed fledgeling feminist movements such as the Women's Liberation Front in the US and Mouvement de Libération des Femmes in France. Decades of oppression against gay men and women erupted in a pitched battle in New York, when the police tried to close the Stonewall, a gay bar in the West Village and a politicised gay rights movement exploded.

Superstudio's response was to develop its 'Anti–Design' projects: themes from which were echoed in the work of other radical architects and designers, notably the members of Archizoom, a fellow Florentine group consisting of Andrea Branzi, Gilberto Corretti, Paolo Deganello, Dario and Lucia Bartolini and Massimo Morozzi. Both groups were founded in 1966 and their first important project was to express their theories about the crisis of modernism in the Superarchitecture exhibition in Pistoia, Italy. A year later, they refined the ideas aired in Superarchitecture in a joint follow–up show in Modena."

(Design Museum)

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1966 • Adolfo Natalini • Alessandro Magris • Andrea Branzi • Anti-Design (agenda) • Archigram • architectural thinking • Archizoom • avant-garde • avant-garde thinking • Cristiano Toraldo di Francia • Cultural Revolution • Dario Bartolini • design museum • disillusionment • FlorenceFluxus group • Foreign Office Architects • Gilberto Corretti • ItalyJoseph Beuys • Lucia Bartolini • Mao Tse-tung • Massimo Morozzi • Modena • modernismmodernist ideals • Mouvement de Liberation des Femmes • Nam June PaikNikita Khrushchev • Paolo Deganello • Peoples Republic of Chinaphotocollage • Piero Frassinelli • Pistoia • political frustration • pop artPragueradical architecture • radical design • Rem Koolhaas • Roberto Magris • scientific method • Studio Alchymia • Superarchitecture (exhibition) • superfluous objects • Superstudio • technocratic optimism • Toraldo di Francia • University of Florence • Vietnam war • visionary scenarios • visual arts • vociferous • Womens Liberation Front

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2013

Design Fiction as Pedagogic Practice: Towards a fictionally biased design education

"My challenge is how to construct and design an educational curriculum that develops the wide range of skills and knowledge it takes to be a designer, whilst opening up a space for our students to push the boundaries of our discipline. By focussing on the speculative and fictional, design is no longer constrained by the practical reality of todays material and economic restrictions. The part of our curriculum that concentrates on the fictional, pulls important parts of design practice into focus; narrative construction, user interactions, representations of affect, communication and contextualisation. We train designers to become fluent in the operational mechanics of their practice."

(Matt Ward, 17 July 2013)

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acting out • Archigram • behavioural trajectories for action • design artefactsdesign curriculumdesign educationdesign fictiondesign futuresdesign proposalsdesign speculationdiegetic • diegetic prototype • discarded designs • engaging stories • experimental design • fiction and speculation • fictional futures • fictionalisationimaginationimaginative storiesimagined possibilitiesimagining • Madeleine Akrich • manifestonew forms of interactionproposalspushes boundariesspeculative designspeculative proposalsSuperstudio • transformative potential • unread • user interactions • vapourware

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
13 JUNE 2010

Archigram Archival Project: a digital resource of the speculative architectural design group

"The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a purely digital resource, displaying digital versions of works held in many different collections. The main collections are the Archigram Archive, held and run by Dennis Crompton and the Ron Herron Archive, held and run by Simon Herron, but work from other personal Archigram collections and public collections has also been made available through this current project. ...

The AAP focuses on the main Archigram period of 1961–1974, but includes all the projects, both before and after these dates, which have been included in the project list of the Archigram Archives at the time of doing the project. The main omissions from the Archigram Archival Project website are the films, television programmes and audio–visual material which for technical or copyright reasons cannot be included at this stage."

(Centre for Experimental Practice, Department of Architecture at the University of Westminster)

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19611974 • AAP • Archigram • Archigram Archival Project • Archigram Archive • architecturearchiveauthorshipavant-gardecollectionconceptualisationcreative practiceDavid GreeneDennis Cromptondesigndesign history • digital resource • experimentationinnovationMike WebbPeter CookRon Herronspeculative designUKUniversity of WestminsterWarren Chalk

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MAY 2009

Walking City: urbanism gone ambulatory, a metropolis on the move

"In 1964, Ron Herron of Archigram proposed a Walking City: urbanism gone ambulatory, a metropolis on the move. The Walking City, strutting along on iron stilts, was imagined as an 'escape hatch from environmental conditions,' Simon Sadler writes. It was an 'architecture of rescue' – a city in shining armor – 'partly inspired by the tents and field hospitals of humanitarian relief efforts.'

Herron also had openly utopian intentions for the project. If the city didn't like where it was, for instance – if its residents found their surroundings boring, oppressive or even quasi–fascist – the whole thing could simply stand up and walk away, re–settling itself elsewhere, freed from the constraints of law and geography."
(Blend Magazine)

[Image: Ron Herron/Archigram, The Walking City]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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