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02 NOVEMBER 2014

Masters graduate prototypes medical emergency ambulance drone

"For the Ambulance Drone, a new type of frame was developed that is a compact flying toolbox containing essential supplies for (lay–person) advanced life support. Portability and foldability help the drone to be used anywhere, also indoors. The first prototype focuses on the delivery of an Automated Defibrillator (AED). ...

The Ambulance Drone is the result of my Master Graduation thesis research project. It aims to save lives through the delivery of emergency supplies within the first minute after an accident. On the 28th of October [2014] I will be presenting this project and graduate from the TU Delft, after which I will look for funding to continue development of this project."

(Alec Momont, 2014)

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2014 • Alec Momont • ambulance drone • applied research • Automated External Defibrillator (AED) • cardiac arrest • compact flying toolbox • defibrillator • DelftDelft University of Technologydesign prototypedesign student projectdrone • drones for good • emergency calls • emergency services • engineering graduate • essential supplies for • flying defibrillator • heart attack victim • helicopter • Jurgen de Jaeger • Kees Nauta • lay-person • life support • life-saving • livestream webcam • Masters students • medical emergency • Netherlands • on-board camera • paramedic • patient • Peter de Jonghe • product designquadcopterresearch project • Richard Goossens • student projects • thesis research project • TU Delft • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2013

The (UK) National Institute for Health Research

"The mission of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is to maintain a health research system in which the NHS supports outstanding individuals, working in world class facilities, conducting leading edge research focused on the needs of patients and the public. ...

Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has worked with key partners involved in the different elements of NHS research to transform research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research."

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2006 • applied health research • basic science • clinical medicineclinical researchDepartment of Healthhealth • health research • leading edge research • medical practicemedical research • National Institute for Health Research • NHS • NIHR • patientpatient care • patient needs • primary careresearch • Research for Patient Benefit • research funding • RfPB • Sally Davies • tangible benefits • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

What is the Liverpool Care Pathway?

"The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a scheme that is intended to improve the quality of care in the final hours or days of a patient's life, and to ensure a peaceful and comfortable death. It aims to guide doctors, nurses and other health workers looking after someone who is dying on issues such as the appropriate time to remove tubes providing food and fluid, or when to stop medication.

However, its use for some has become controversial, with relatives reportedly claiming it has been used without consent, and some saying it is used inappropriately.

This criticism and the media emphasis on the supposed controversy is puzzling, as the LCP has been standard practice in most hospitals for a number of years. The LCP has also received recognition on both a national and international level as an example of good practice.

As a GP put it in the British Medical Journal, the LCP 'has transformed end of life care from an undignified, painful experience into a peaceful, dignified death at home'"

(NHS Choices, UK)

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1990s • advanced illness • British Medical Journal • care • comfortable death • consent • controversydeath • death pathway • diedignitydyingemotional needsend of life • end of life care • end-of-life careeuthanasiagood practiceGPguide • health workers • healthcare • hospice • hospital • LCP (acronym) • life • Liverpool Care Pathway • Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute • media criticism • medication • multidisciplinary approach • National Health Service • NHS • palliative care • patientpatient care • peaceful • physical needs • plan of care • prolonging life • public health • quality of care • relieve suffering • Royal Liverpool University Hospital • social needs • spiritual needs • suffering • terminally ill • UK • undignified

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JUNE 2011

The hospital, contains the complete arsenal of modern healing, but is devoted to a radical deescalation of the medical process

"The hospital is a sequence of pavilions, each devoted to a particular disease. They are connected by a medical boulevard –a slow–moving belt that displays the sick in a continuous procession, with a group of dancing nurses in transparent uniforms, medical equipment disguised as totem poles, and rich perfumes that suppress the familiar stench of healing, in an almost festive atmosphere of operatic melodies.

Doctors select their patients from this belt, invite them to their individual pavilions, test their vitality, and almost playfully administer their (medical) knowledge. If they fail, the patient is returned to the conveyer; perhaps another doctor tries the patient, but it soon becomes apparent that the belt leads beyond the pavilions, through the cruciform building, and straight into the cemetery."

(Koolhaas, R., M. Vreisendorp, et al.)

Fig.1 – 9 Rem Koolhaas, Madelon Vreisendorp, Elia Zenghelis, and Zoe Zenghelis (1972). 'Exodus, or the voluntary prisoners of architecture'

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TAGS

1972appropriation • architectural sequence • arsenal • boulevardcemeterycollage • continuous procession • conveyer belt • cruciform • cut-outcut-out illustrationdancingdiseasedoctor • Elia Zenghelis • exodus • festive atmosphere • graphic style • healing • hospitalillustrationimaginary landscapes • Madelon Vreisendorp • medical boulevard • medical equipment • medical knowledge • medical process • melody • modern healing • nurseoperationpatientpavilionperfumephotocollagephotomontageplayful • prisoners of architecture • radical deescalation • Rem Koolhaassequencespace-framespatial narrativesspeculative design • totem poles • uniform • urban speculation • vitality • Zoe Zenghelis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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