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31 MARCH 2012

Stylesight: fashion trend forecasting and analysis

"Stylesight is the industry–leading content and technology solution for professionals in the style, fashion and design sectors. We deliver global information and a visionary online workspace designed to help you anticipate and analyze an ever–changing marketplace."

(Stylesight)

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TAGS

change innovation • commercial insightconsumer lifestylesconsumer trendscreative business insightscreative intelligenceculture and mediadesign inspirationdesign resource • ever-changing marketplace • fashion designfashion forecasting • fashion trend analysis • fashion trend forecasting • image libraryinspiring designlifestylenew productsnew servicesonline magazineretail analysisrevenue-building ideas • spotting trends • style • Stylesight • subscription servicetrend analysis • trend board • visionary ideasvisual communicationvisual culturevisual designvisual inspirationworkflow tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2012

Stylus: business intelligence and inspiration to drive new ideas

"Culture & Media reveals how the worlds of entertainment, media and digital and the creative side of marketing and advertising influence cultural movements that impact on business decisions. Expert reports on art, graphics, illustration and global exhibitions offer visual inspiration for inquisitive creative minds."

(Stylus media group)

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TAGS

account manager • active leisure time • advertisingart and cultureart worldB2Bbrand managerbrand strategy • business decisions • buyers • childrenswear • colour • colour trends • commercial implications • commercial insightconsumer lifestylesconsumer productsconsumer products in homeconsumer trendscreative business insightscreative directorcreative industriescreative intelligence • creative marketing • creative media • creatively led retailing • cross-sector innovation • culture and media • design and cultural influences • design inspirationdesign magazinedesign resourcedesign trendsdigital commerce • entertainment news • expert information • expert report • fashion buyers • fashion design • fashion designers • fashion manufacturing • fashion retail • furniture designfuture concepts • gastronomy • global analysis • global expert opinion • global information • graduate showsgraphic designerhome accessories • hospitality • in-depth analysis • industrial design • industry executives • innovative design • inquisitive creative minds • insider guides • inspirational destinations • inspirational visual contentinspiring design • inspiring illustration • interior architectureinterior stylingknowledge based economyleisure industrieslifestyle • marketing manager • material trends • materials innovationmenswear • merchandise planner • merchandising and management • new productsnew servicesonline magazine • packaging designer • product designer • product developer • product directions • product launches • product manager • retail analysis • retail landscape • revenue-building ideasscience and technology • seasonal colour inspiration • sports and leisure • sports industries • store design • Stylus (magazine) • subscription service • sustainable thinking • technology innovationtextilestravel and leisure • travel industries • trend analysis • trend setting • trendsvisual communicationvisual culturevisual designvisual inspiration • visual merchandiser • visual merchandisingwomenswear • youth and beauty

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2011

Design-based Learning for Knowledge-based Economies

"in the ninety years since the creation of the Bauhaus, design educators have constantly challenged the definition of design as a discipline, consequently reshaping the mission and vision of design programs. With the advent of the Bauhaus, design emerged as the integration of artistic methods with scientific principles in order to educate a new generation of artists and craftsmen and better train them to infuse humanistic values into industrial production systems. Later, with the incorporation of design into higher education, it became a self–contained discipline as part of the arts and sciences responsible for the production of knowledge, followed by a process of branching out to multiple specializations within the design discipline. Since then, designers have graduated as experts instrumental in the development of new products and communication strategies demanded by market economies. Curiously, while in the professional context the design discipline has been interpreted as business function, in education, design and business–related disciplines such as marketing, management, and finance were separated by ideological principles and credit distribution requirements. Consequently, the design, business, and liberal arts disciplines were never combined into one program, despite the clear signals that these disciplines are complementary and dependent on each other in terms of imagining new ways of infusing social and environmental principles within resilient production systems regulated by market economies."

(Carlos Teixeira, p.560–561, IASDR 2009)

1). Teixeira, C. (2009). The Entrepreneurial Design Curriculum: Design–based Learning for Knowledge–based Economies. International Association of Societies of Design Research. Seoul, Korea.

TAGS

2009academic disciplinesarts and sciencesBauhaus Schoolbusiness • Carlos Teixeira • creative industries • design as a discipline • design curriculumdesign educators • design enterprise • design managementdesign pedagogydesign-based learningdesignersentrepreneurship • humanistic values • IASDR • ideological principles • industrial production systems • integration of artistic methods with scientific principles • International Association of Societies of Design Researchknowledge-based economyliberal arts • market economies • multiple specialisations • new products • production systems • professional contextrealisation rulesrecontextualisation of knowledge • self-contained discipline • social and environmental principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 APRIL 2009

Design Thinking: a methodology that imbues the full spectrum of innovation activities with a human-centred design ethos

"Design thinking is ... a discipline that uses the designer's sensibility and methods to match people's needs with what is technologically feasible and what a viable business strategy can convert into customer value and market opportunity. Like [Thomas] Edison's painstaking innovation process, it often entails a great deal of perspiration. ...

Historically, design has been treated as a downstream step in the development process – the point where designers, who have played no earlier role in the substantive work of innovation, come along and put a beautiful wrapper around the idea. To be sure, this approach has stimulated market growth in many areas by making new products and technologies aesthetically attractive and therefore more desirable to consumers or by enhancing brand perception through smart, evocative advertising and communication strategies. During the latter half of the twentieth century design became an increasingly valuable competitive asset in, for example, the consumer electronics, automotive, and consumer packaged goods industries. But in most others it remained a late–stage add–on.

Now, however, rather than asking designers to make an already developed idea more attractive to consumers, companies are asking them to create ideas that better meet consumers' needs and desires. The former role is tactical, and results in limited value creation; the latter is strategic, and leads to dramatic new forms of value."

(Tim Brown, 2008, Harvard Business Review)

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TAGS

2008 • aesthetically attractive • applied researchbest practicebrand perceptionbusiness machine • business savvy • business sense • business world • communication strategiescompetitive advantageconsumer desireconsumer electronics • consumer packaged goods • consumerscreativity • customer value • design ideasdesign methodologydesign methodsdesign thinkingdesigners • designers sensibility • development process • dictation • direct observationdiscovery through design • discrete device • electric light bulb • electric power generation • electric power transmission • envisionevocative advertisingexperimental investigationgeneralistgenius • gifted tinkerers • Harvard Business Reviewhuman-centred designhumanisation of technologyIDEOimprovisationinnovation • innovation activities • innovation processintegrationinventioninventoriterative designlightbulblone genius • market growth • market opportunity • marketplace • Menlo Park • needs and desires • new forms of value • new productsnew technologies • parlour trick • phonograph • prescient • product differentiation • products are made • products are marketed • products are packaged • products are sold • products are supported • recording dictation • replaying dictation • research and development • research and development laboratory • strategic thinking • substantive work of innovation • team-based approach • technologically feasible • Thomas Edison • trial and error • twentieth century • viable business strategy • what people want

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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