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Which clippings match 'Design-based Learning' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 MARCH 2012

Integrating the process of design thinking into the classroom

"When you think of design thinking, think of innovative outcomes – like the iPod, or that perfect peeler that both cuts well and has an amazing grip, or the Aravind Eye Care system that allows for thousands of underresourced families in India to address cataract issues.

Pioneers of design thinking called it the process of 'a practical, creative resolution of problems or issues that looks for an improved future result' (Simon, 1969). Recently, educational researchers have been asking what happens when educators integrate the process of design thinking into the classroom. Their findings include numerous examples of enhanced student learning."

(Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, Atlanta)

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TAGS

21st centurybetter-functioning productschildrenclassroomcollaborationcomplexity • constructivist theories of learning • convergent thinking • creative resolution of problems • creativitycreativity skillscritical thinking • D.E.E.P. • design approach • design innovationdesign responsibilitydesign thinking • design thinking approach • design thinking in classroomdesign-based learningdesign-oriented thinking • deviate from facts • Discover Empathise Experiment Produce • divergent thinkingeducationeducatoreffective communication • enhanced student learning • experimentation • exploring possibilities • hands on • Herbert Simon • innovative outcomes • K-4 • know-how • learning as a social activity • multidisciplinary teams • MVPS • pedagogyproblem-oriented thinkingproblem-solvingproduct design • science concepts • science lab • scripted approach to enquiry • socio-technological dimensionssolving problemsspeculative designstudent achievementteaching science • traditional learning frameworks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2011

Design-based Learning for Knowledge-based Economies

"in the ninety years since the creation of the Bauhaus, design educators have constantly challenged the definition of design as a discipline, consequently reshaping the mission and vision of design programs. With the advent of the Bauhaus, design emerged as the integration of artistic methods with scientific principles in order to educate a new generation of artists and craftsmen and better train them to infuse humanistic values into industrial production systems. Later, with the incorporation of design into higher education, it became a self–contained discipline as part of the arts and sciences responsible for the production of knowledge, followed by a process of branching out to multiple specializations within the design discipline. Since then, designers have graduated as experts instrumental in the development of new products and communication strategies demanded by market economies. Curiously, while in the professional context the design discipline has been interpreted as business function, in education, design and business–related disciplines such as marketing, management, and finance were separated by ideological principles and credit distribution requirements. Consequently, the design, business, and liberal arts disciplines were never combined into one program, despite the clear signals that these disciplines are complementary and dependent on each other in terms of imagining new ways of infusing social and environmental principles within resilient production systems regulated by market economies."

(Carlos Teixeira, p.560–561, IASDR 2009)

1). Teixeira, C. (2009). The Entrepreneurial Design Curriculum: Design–based Learning for Knowledge–based Economies. International Association of Societies of Design Research. Seoul, Korea.

TAGS

2009academic disciplinesarts and sciencesBauhaus Schoolbusiness • Carlos Teixeira • creative industries • design as a discipline • design curriculumdesign educators • design enterprise • design managementdesign pedagogydesign-based learningdesignersentrepreneurship • humanistic values • IASDR • ideological principles • industrial production systems • integration of artistic methods with scientific principles • International Association of Societies of Design Researchknowledge-based economyliberal arts • market economies • multiple specialisations • new products • production systems • professional contextrealisation rulesrecontextualisation of knowledge • self-contained discipline • social and environmental principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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