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24 SEPTEMBER 2013

Inside Out of Mind: ethnographic research catalyst for theatre project

"Based on extraordinary and extensive ethnographic research, Inside Out of Mind offers moving insight into the mysterious domain of dementia; a world of medical magical realism peopled with puppets and performers in pursuit of a lost man in pursuit of lost love. A darkly comic and empathic tale."

(Meeting Ground Theatre Company)

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TAGS

Anna Mottram • arts and sciencesdementiadissemination through performanceethnographic researchethnographically informed study • Health Care Assistant (HCA) • healthcare • Holly-Robyn Harrison • hospital treatment • hospital wards • Inside Out of Mind (play) • Jarrod Cooke • Jim Findley • Joanna Macleod • Joanne Lloyd • Justine Schneider • Kezia Scales • Lakeside Arts Centre (Nottingham) • Lily Lowe-Myers • Maurice Roeves • Maxine Finch • medical research • Meeting Ground (theatre company) • NHS • no name • Nottinghamnursepatient carereality as processresearch disseminationresearch project • Sean Myatt • Simon Bailey • Tanya Myers • theatre • theatre company • theatre projectstheatrical performancetheatrical playtrauma • Ulrike Johannson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MARCH 2013

Abductive Reasoning as a Way of Worldmaking

"What is the function of abductive inference? For [Charles Sanders] Peirce it is 'the process of forming an explanatory hypothesis. It is the only logical operation which introduces any new idea; for induction does nothing but determine a value, and deduction merely evolves the necessary consequences of a pure hypothesis. Deduction proves that something must be; induction shows that something actually is operative; abduction merely suggests that something may be' (CP 5.171, cf 1991a, p.333). Abduction may thus be conceived of as a principle that allows us to reconstruct how conceptual order is achieved through the imposition of a hypothesis (in the form of a minimal theory, an idea, a rule or a law–like hypothesis) – which inaugurates constructivist thinking. Here I can only hint at the great variability of this schema; it enables us to bridge the traditional gap between the arts and the sciences because it can be used as a model both of explanation and of understanding."

(Hans Rudi Fischer, pp. 368, 2001)

Peirce, Charles Sanders (CP). (1931–35, 1958) "Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce". Bd. I–VI (1931–34) ed by Ch. Hartshorne and P. Weiss. Vol. VII–VIII (1958) ed. By A.W. Burks. Cambridge, Massachusetts/London.

Peirce, Charles Sanders (1991a), Naturordnung und Zeichenprozeß. Schriften über Semiotik und Naturphilosophie. Hrsg. und eingeleitet von Helmut Pape. Frankfurt/Main, Suhrkamp.

Foundations of Science, special issue on "The Impact of Radical Constructivism on Science", edited by A. Riegler, 2001, vol. 6, no.4: 361–383. "Abductive Reasoning as a Way of Worldmaking", Hans Rudi Fischer, Heidelberger Institut für systemische Forschung und Therapie, Kussmaulstr. 10, D–69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

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TAGS

2001 • abduction • abductive inference • abductive reasoningarts and sciencesCharles Sanders Peirceconstructivismdeductive reasoning • explanatory hypothesis • Foundations of Science (academic journal) • Hans Fischer • hermeneutical procedures • hermeneuticshypothesisinductive reasoninginferenceinterpretation of experience • knowing as inferring • knowledge of the world • language gameslogical rationalitylogical rules of inferencelogical-analytical paradigm • logically false • Ludwig Wittgenstein • manufacturing of knowledge • material environment • paralogical reasoning • paralogism • paralogy • philosophical construction • praxis of living • rationalityreasoning • retroduction • rule system • rule-following • rules of thought • synthetic thinking • traditional logic • worldmaking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2013

The arts and sciences are drawn more closely together by technology

"A passion for bringing together expertise in the arts, computing and technology is inspiring the University of Greenwich's new Professor of Digital Creativity.

Gregory Sporton, who joins in January [2013] from Birmingham City University, has spent much of his academic career researching the impact of new technology on the visual and performing arts. He is a former professional dancer and has also researched the history of ballet in Soviet times.

He is excited about introducing a new and original focus on the arts to Greenwich. 'I aim to gather together the expertise we have in so many disciplines, such as creative arts, computing, visualisation and all the rest, and make something new and interesting,' Professor Sporton says.

'The arts and sciences are drawn more closely together by technology: there is less differentiation than people think, and at Greenwich I want to build a research environment to explore that."

(University of Greenwich News, 17 December 2012)

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2013artsarts and sciences • ballerina • ballet • Birmingham City University • Birmingham Institute of Art and Designbodycomputingcreative artsdancerdigital creativityGreenwich • Gregory Sporton • impact of new technology • institutional strategic agenda • MotivePro Suit • performerperforming artsposture • Professor of Digital Creativity • research agenda • research environmenttraining • University of Greenwich • visual artsvisualisationVisualisation Research Unit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2011

Design-based Learning for Knowledge-based Economies

"in the ninety years since the creation of the Bauhaus, design educators have constantly challenged the definition of design as a discipline, consequently reshaping the mission and vision of design programs. With the advent of the Bauhaus, design emerged as the integration of artistic methods with scientific principles in order to educate a new generation of artists and craftsmen and better train them to infuse humanistic values into industrial production systems. Later, with the incorporation of design into higher education, it became a self–contained discipline as part of the arts and sciences responsible for the production of knowledge, followed by a process of branching out to multiple specializations within the design discipline. Since then, designers have graduated as experts instrumental in the development of new products and communication strategies demanded by market economies. Curiously, while in the professional context the design discipline has been interpreted as business function, in education, design and business–related disciplines such as marketing, management, and finance were separated by ideological principles and credit distribution requirements. Consequently, the design, business, and liberal arts disciplines were never combined into one program, despite the clear signals that these disciplines are complementary and dependent on each other in terms of imagining new ways of infusing social and environmental principles within resilient production systems regulated by market economies."

(Carlos Teixeira, p.560–561, IASDR 2009)

1). Teixeira, C. (2009). The Entrepreneurial Design Curriculum: Design–based Learning for Knowledge–based Economies. International Association of Societies of Design Research. Seoul, Korea.

TAGS

2009academic disciplinesarts and sciencesBauhaus Schoolbusiness • Carlos Teixeira • creative industries • design as a discipline • design curriculumdesign educators • design enterprise • design managementdesign pedagogydesign-based learningdesignersentrepreneurship • humanistic values • IASDR • ideological principles • industrial production systems • integration of artistic methods with scientific principles • International Association of Societies of Design Researchknowledge-based economyliberal arts • market economies • multiple specialisations • new products • production systems • professional contextrealisation rulesrecontextualisation of knowledge • self-contained discipline • social and environmental principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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