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Which clippings match 'Indian' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 DECEMBER 2013

Video lecture of the December TEL Event at Bournemouth University

"BU December TEL Event", Uploaded on 17 Dec 2013 by BU Business School.

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2013Blackboard (LMS)Bournemouth UniversityBrazil • Centre for Excellence in Media Practice (CEMP) • creating and integrating small dataDesire2Learneducation technology • Gelareh Roushan • IBMIndian • internet learning • John East • learning engagementlearning technologyLMS • Media School at Bournemouth University • MOOCspeople and organisationspersonalised educationpersonalised healthcareRaspberry PiRavensbourneremote learningresearch and innovation • reverse outsourcing • small data • Small Private Online Course (SPOC) • SPOCs • Stephen Heppellstudent engagementTELvideo lecture • window on the world • Wipro Technologies Ltd

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2013

Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington museum and other collections

"We have long been familiar with the power of the Chinese to balance colours, but we were not so well acquainted with their power of treating purely ornamental or conventional forms ; and in the chapter in the Grammar of Ornament on Chinese Ornament I was led, from my then knowledge, to express the opinion that the Chinese had not the power of dealing with conventional ornamental form : but it now appears that there has been a period in which a School of Art existed in China of a very important kind. We are led to think that this art must in some way have had a foreign origin; it so nearly resembles in all its principles the art of the Mohammedan races, that we may presume it was derived from them. It would be no difficult task to take a work of ornament of this class, and, by simply varying the colouring and correcting the drawing, convert it into an Indian or Persian composition. There is of course, in all these works, something essentially Chinese in the mode of rendering the idea, but the original idea is evidently Mohammedan. The Moors of the present day decorate their pottery under the same instinct, and follow the same laws as the Chinese obeyed in their beautiful enamelled vases. The Moorish artist takes a rudely–fashioned pot or other object, and by a marvellous instinct divides the surface of the object, 'by spots of colour, into triangles of proportionate area, according to the form and size of the object; these triangles are then crossed by others."

(Owen Jones, 1867)

Owen Jones (1867). "Examples of Chinese Ornament Selected from Objects in the South Kensington Museum and Other Collections: By Owen Jones. One Hundred Plates", S. & T. Gilbert, 4 Copthall Buildings, E.C. Back of the Bank of England.

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1867 • ceramic glaze • ceramicsChinesecolourcompositioncultural heritagecultural significance of objectsdecorationdecorative arts • enamel • enamelled vases • flowersformglazeIndianInternet ArchiveIslamicmaterial culture • Mohammedan • Moorish • Moors • motifMuslim • object surface • orientalismornamentalornamental formOwen JonesPeoples Republic of China • Persian • pigmentpotspottery • rudely fashioned • South Kensingtonsymbolic meaning • vase • visual appearancevisual designvisual grammar • visual heritage • visual motifvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
10 NOVEMBER 2012

Singin' the Blues: Nina Paley's animated feature film

"Sita Sings the Blues in an animated movie created by Nina Paley. Using 4 different animation styles, Paley weaves together the breakup of her marriage, the singing of Annette Hanshaw and the epic story of Ramayana."

(Ray, 2009–05–15, Four In The Morning)

Fig.1 Nina Paley (2009). "Sita Sings the Blues"

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20092D animation • ancient Sanskrit epic • animated feature filmanimated movieanimation • animation styles • Annette Hanshaw • epic • epic story • feature filmfilmgodsIndian • marriage breakup • Nina PaleyRamayanaSanskritSita Sings the Blues

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

A Town Called Panic: stop-motion film about three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse

"Hilarious and frequently surreal, the stop–motion extravaganza A Town Called Panic has endless charms and raucous laughs for children from eight to eighty. Based on the Belgian animated cult TV series (which was released by Wallace & Gromits Aardman Studios), Panic stars three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse who share a rambling house in a rural town that never fails to attract the weirdest events.

Cowboy and Indians plan to gift Horse with a homemade barbeque backfires when they accidentally buy 50 million bricks. Whoops! This sets off a perilously wacky chain of events as the trio travel to the center of the earth, trek across frozen tundra and discover a parallel underwater universe of pointy–headed (and dishonest!) creatures. Each speedy character is voiced – and animated – as if they are filled with laughing gas. With panic a permanent feature of life in this papier–mâché burg, will Horse and his equine paramour – flame–tressed music teacher Madame Longray (Jeanne Balibar) – ever find a quiet moment alone? A sort of Gallic Monty Python crossed with Art Clokey on acid, A Town Called Panic is zany, brainy and altogether insane–y!."

(Adriana Piasek–Wanski)

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2009 • A Town Called Panic • Aardman Studios • Adriana Piasek-Wanski • animatedanimated filmanimation • Art Clokey • barbeque • BelgianBelgium • brainy • cowboycreaturecultFrancefrozenhorseIndian • Jeanne Balibar • low-fiLuxembourgMonty Python • Panique au Village • paper mache • papier-mache • parallel universeplastic toys • Stephane Aubier • stop motion • tundra • TVTV seriesunderwater • Vincent Patar • zany

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2005

Pakeha: New Zealanders of British or European Ancestry

"How people choose to label themselves is a way of establishing their identity. While 'pakeha' has a variety of meanings, it is principally used to refer to New Zealanders of British or European ancestry. For people several generations removed from their European or British origins, describing themselves, or being described as, Pakeha can mean that they identify as part of a culture unique to this country. The term New Zealander, which is often suggested as an option, refers to nationality, not culture. The descendants of early British colonists are different from Maori, but all are New Zealanders. Chinese and Samoan New Zealanders are as different from each other as people of Dutch or Indian descent, but they all share the same nationality."

(New Zealand Human Rights Commission)

[I am a Pakeha. Until I left Aotearoa/New Zealand I took it for granted that I could identify myself this way. There were even occasions when I found it annoying that I was required to do so on official forms. But since moving away from Aotearoa I find myself feeling quite proud of being a Pakeha New Zealander.]

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ancestryAotearoa New ZealandBritishChinese • colonist • culture • descent • DutchEuropeanidentityIndianMaorinationalityPacificPacific RimPakeha • Pasifika • SamoanSouth Island
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