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Which clippings match 'Design Researcher' keyword pg.1 of 4
15 JULY 2013

New International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation

"International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation is an international publication that provides a forum for discussing the nature and potential of creativity and innovation in design from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Design creativity and innovation is truly an interdisciplinary academic research field that will interest and stimulate researchers of engineering design, industrial design, architecture, art, and similar areas. The journal aims to not only promote existing research disciplines but also pioneer a new one that lies in the intermediate area between the domains of systems engineering, information technology, computer science, social science, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and related fields. The journal welcomes various kinds of research papers (analytical studies, constructive studies, case studies, field studies, literature surveys, etc.) that will establish the basis for the academic discipline of design creativity and innovation."

TAGS

2013academic journal • analogical reasoning • architectural designartificial intelligencecognitive scienceconcept generation • constructive studies • creativity and innovation • design creativity • design creativity and innovation • design educationdesign innovationdesign inspirationdesign researcher • design synthesis • design theoryengineering design • field studies • in-betweenindustrial designinformation technologyinnovative explorations • innovative process • interdisciplinary researchinternational journal • inventive process • inventive worklinguisticsliteraturephilosophypsychology • research field • research papersocial science • systems engineering • Taylor and Francis • theories on design • visual arts research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

Interaction design research artefacts intended to produce knowledge

"We differentiate research artifacts from design practice artifacts in two important ways. First, the intent going into the research is to produce knowledge for the research and practice communities, not to make a commercially viable product. To this end, we expect research projects that take this research through design approach will ignore or deemphasize perspectives in framing the problem, such as the detailed economics associated with manufacturability and distribution, the integration of the product into a product line, the effect of the product on a company's identity, etc. In this way design researchers focus on making the right things, while design practitioners focus on making commercially successful things.

Second, research contributions should be artifacts that demonstrate significant invention. The contributions should be novel integrations of theory, technology, user need, and context; not just refinements of products that already exist in the research literature or commercial markets. The contribution must demonstrate a significant advance through the integration. This aspect of a design research contribution makes particular sense in the interaction design space of HCI. Meteoric technological advances in hardware and software drive an aggressive invention of novel products in HCI and interaction design domains that are not as aggressively experienced by other design domains. While product designers might find themselves redesigning office furniture to meet the changing needs of work, interaction designers more often find themselves tasked with inventing whole new product categories.

Our model of design research allows interaction design researchers to do what designers do best: to study the world and then to make things intended to affect change. Our model provides a new channel for the power of design thinking, desired by many disciplines, to be unleashed as in a research context. Design researchers can contribute from a position of strength, instead of aping the methods of other disciplines as a means of justifying their research contribution."

(John Zimmerman, Jodi Forlizzi, Shelley Evenson, p.500, 2007)

John Zimmerman, Jodi Forlizzi, and Shelley Evenson (2007). "Research through design as a method for interaction design research in HCI". In Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '07). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 493–502. DOI=10.1145/1240624.1240704 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1240624.1240704

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

Exploration oriented design process: focussing on the interplay between designer, techniques and materials in design research

"My field of interest is what I will call an exploration oriented design process included in design research; a process focussing on the interplay between designer, techniques and materials. The role of the artefact is to act as a reflecting and responding means for pushing the research process forward to clarify what is possible and how, regarding the research question. A related example of such an approach to research is found at the research cluster Autonomatic (2009) at Falmouth College University, which do research that explores the use of digital manufacturing technologies in the creative process of designing and making three dimensional objects.

As a contrast, consider a problem oriented design process included in design research. That is, designing which, although research embedded, nevertheless aims at developing working prototypes or appearance models, just as ordinary professional design. An example is the Ph.D. project by Jonathan Allen discussed by Pedgley and Wormald (2007). The aim of Jonathan Allen's research was to advance the design of, and champion new approaches to designing, products for people with severe communication disabilities and physical impairment. During his project, he developed a fully working prototype communication device.

However, in the present paper I shall demonstrate that exploration oriented design can be fruitful as a design research method, because it is relieved from the usual obligation to fulfil a purpose of everyday use, solve problems or fulfil certain needs. As we shall see, the exploration oriented design process does not proceed as a series of isolated experiments, but rather as a cluster of parallel and interdependent experiments, which as a whole reflect the potential of the research question. I will argue that this approach turns design practice in which the design researcher is trained into an effective tool for design research."

(Flemming Tvede Hansen, p.99, 2009)

Hansen, Flemming Tvede. (2009). "A Search for Unpredictable Relationships". EKSIG 2009: Experiential Knowledge, Method & Methodology, Experiential Knowledge Special Interest Group.

TAGS

2009 • appearance models • Autonomatic (research cluster) • communication device • communication disability • design practicedesign researchdesign research methodologydesign researcherdesign techniquesdesigningdesigning and making • digital manufacturing • digital manufacturing technologies • EKSIG • everyday use • exploration oriented design • exploration oriented design process • Falmouth College University • Flemming Tvede Hansen • fulfil needs • interdependent experiments • interplay between • isolated experiments • Jonathan Allen • new approaches to design • ordinary professional design • Owain Pedgley • parallel experiments • Paul Wormald • physical impairment • problem oriented design process • reflecting and responding • research process • role of the artefact • solving problemsthree dimensional objectsworking prototypes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

Creativity is key to successful completion of design researcher PhDs

"DESIGNERS ENJOY DESIGNING
The practicalities of the design–based Ph.D (or Ph.D's generally in the creative arts) often fails to recognise the wider needs of the researcher who would typically have bachelors and masters degrees in their field and where the structure of their degree programme(s) would have been practice–based i.e. they have considerable prior history of creative practice; they enjoy creative practice; and they may well miss the fulfilment of creative practice if none was undertaken during a three to five year full time Ph.D.

STUDENTS NEED TUTORS THAT CAN DESIGN
Practice–based learning at undergraduate and masters level requires a significant taught input by competent practitioners. It is all too common for academics to loose or fail to develop capability in practice as they move through an academic career that is based on teaching and research. The typical route by which full–time academics with a practitioner background acquire a Ph.D is through part–time study. In order to maintain competence as a practitioner for the benefit of students, there is a case to encourage the use of practice in staff Ph.D's.

RESEARCH OUTCOMES NEED DESIGNING
An unexpected outcome from the author's experience of Ph.D supervision in creative disciplines has been the scenario where professional practice was necessary for the progress of the research. 'Tools' are a popular and relevant outcome from design–based Ph.D's and situations arise where the tool itself must be designed in order to facilitate its validation. It is therefore necessary to consider the use of researcher–practice where practice is not a direct means of the data collection but a process by which research outcomes can progress to validation."

(Mark Evans, p.75, 2009)

Evans, M. (2009). "Creative professional practice in methods and methodology: case study examples from Ph.D's in industrial design". EKSIG 2009: Experiential Knowledge, Method & Methodology, Experiential Knowledge Special Interest Group.

TAGS

2009 • academic career • capability in practice • competence as a practitioner • competent practitioners • creative arts • creative disciplines • creative motivationcreative practicecreativitydata collection techniquesdesign researcher • design-based PhD • design-based researchdesignersEKSIG • engaging in practice • industrial design • interviewing practitioners • Mark Evans • motivation • needs of the researcher • PhD studentsPhD supervision • practice for data collection • practitioner background • professional practice • research outcomes • researcher-practice • successful completion • teaching and research • tutors that can design • underlying motivation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

2nd Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposium

"Mobile phones have evolved rapidly from a communication device to a creative and educational tool. The current mediascape can be described as a dynamic ecosystem that has seen the emergence of new media aesthetics and formats, such as iPhoneography and mobile–mentary (mobile documentary) filmmaking. For communities world–wide mobile technologies provide access to a vast amount of new services. (Mobile phone) users (or rather pro–d–users), artists, designers, filmmakers and independent creatives can define new modes of mobile media practices transcending the realm of established disciplines and transforming the contemporary mediascape. The participatory turn in media culture (collaboration, co–creation and crowd–sourcing) creates new opportunities and challenges for visual communication design. Mobile devices enable us to see the world from new viewpoints and angles."

(Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa, 2012)

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TAGS

2012 • 2nd Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposium • Andrew Quitmeyer • Aotearoa New Zealand • Camille Baker • Daniel Mauro • Daniel Wagner • Dean Keep • design researcherfilmmaking • Gavin Wilson • International Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation SymposiumiPhoneographyLaurent AntonczakLynne CiochettoMax SchlesermediascapeMINAMINA2012Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoamobile mediamobile media practicesmobile phonemobile video production

CONTRIBUTOR

Max Schleser
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