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Which clippings match 'Silicon Valley' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 DECEMBER 2015

The Future of Learning

"Technological progress and innovation is shaping the world of learning and, in turn, the future we will create."

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TAGS

201521st Century pedagogies21st Century skills • Beth Kuenstler • challenges and changeschallenges and opportunities • change-makers • cognitive computing • critical skills • disruptive thinking • education • evolving landscape of education • exponential growth • exponential learning experiences • exponential technologies • exponentially advancing technologies • exponentially growing technologies • flexibility and innovation • functionally obsolete • future careerfuture of educationfuture of learning • grand challenges • groundbreaking thinking • InnovatiBA conference • interdisciplinary university • mindset • NASA Research Park • Nicole Wilson • pressing challenges • Shlomy Kattan • Silicon Valley • Singularity University • suffusiontechnological progress • Tina Davar

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JULY 2013

The Social-Media Bubble is Quietly Deflating

"It might be over. Social–media companies drew only 2 percent of the venture capital headed to Internet–based enterprises last quarter, according to data published on Tuesday by CB Insights, a research firm that tracks venture–capital investment. In the two–year stretch that ended in the middle of 2012, social–media companies took in at least 6 percent of overall venture capital invested in Internet companies each quarter. But for three of the last four quarters, those social startups have brought in 2 percent or less (with the outlier quarter largely the result of a huge investment in Pinterest earlier this year). The peak came in the third quarter of 2011, when social companies led by Twitter took in 21 percent of the total $3.8 billion in Internet deals by venture capital firms."

(Joshua Brustein, 16 July 2013, Businessweek)

Fig.1 Andreas L avl42 (27 March 2012). "Skyline with Cranes" [http://www.flickr.com/photos/avl42/6880333552/].

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2012ads • Anand Sanwal • Ashlee Vance • banner ad • big dataBloomberg BusinessweekBloomberg LPbusiness • CB Insights • click-through ratecloud computing • consumer-oriented application • e-commerce • economic bubble • Facebook • financial bubble • grouponInternet boom • Internet bubble • market bubble • NASDAQPinterestpredictions • price bubble • Silicon Valleysocial media • social media bubble • social media companies • social media startups • speculation • speculative bubble • Twitterventure capital • venture capitalists • Zynga

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2013

Visualising interconnectedness through social network streams

"Tech City Map, created by developers at Trampoline Systems and designed by Playgen, pulls in streams of social network data for all of the businesses in the area to help analyse their influence. The Tech City Map follows in the footsteps of Matt Biddulph's original Silicon Roundabout map as well as Wired's very own version, produced in 2009."

(Olivia Solon and Nate Lanxon, 10 November 2011, Wired UK)

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TAGS

2011 • academic partners • affinityAmazon.combusinessbusiness community • Central London • chartCiscoCity University Londoncluster mapping • creative startup • data visualisationDavid Camerondiagrameast LondonEast London Tech CityEric van der KleijFacebookGoogle IncGoogle MapsGreenwichHackneyhubImperial College Londoninformation visualisationIntelinterconnectedness • Islington • LondonLoughborough Universitymap • Matt Biddulph • media companiesnetwork • Newham • next-generation applications • next-generation services • Old Street • Old Street roundabout • Olympic Legacy Company • Olympic Park • Playgen • Qualcomm • Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park • relatedness • retweets • ShoreditchSilicon Roundabout • Silicon Roundabout map • Silicon Valleysoftware companiesstart-up business • Stratford • Tech City • Tech City cluster • Tech City Map • technology companies • Tower Hamlets • Trampoline Systems Ltd • Twitter streamUK • UK headquarters • University College LondonvisualisationVodafoneweb of connections

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2011

Adam Curtis: the network ecology myth

"The new series, called All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace, takes complicated ideas and turns them into entertainment by the use of the vertigo–inducing intellectual leaps, choppy archive material and disorienting music with which all Curtis fans are familiar. The central idea leads Curtis on a journey, taking in the chilling über–individualist novelist Ayn Rand, former chairman of the Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan, the 'new economy', hippy communes, Silicon Valley, ecology, Richard Dawkins, the wars in Congo, the lonely suicide in a London squat of the mathematical genius who invented the selfish gene theory, and the computer model of the eating habits of the pronghorn antelope.

You can see why Zoe Williams once wrote that, while watching one of Curtis's programmes, 'I kept thinking the dog was sitting on the remote. ...'

Now he has moved on to machines, but it starts with nature. 'In the 1960s, an idea penetrated deep into the public imagination that nature is a self–regulating ecosystem, there is a natural order,' Curtis says. 'The trouble is, it's not true–as many ecologists have shown, nature is never stable, it's always changing. But the idea took root and spread wider–people started to believe there is an underlying order to the entire world, to how society is structured. Everything became part of a system, like a computer; no more hierarchies, freedom for all, no class, no nation states.' What the series shows is how this idea spread into the heart of the modern world, from internet utopianism and dreams of democracy without leaders to visions of a new kind of stable global capitalism run by computers. But we have paid a price for this: without realising it we, and our leaders, have given up the old progressive dreams of changing the world and instead become like managers–seeing ourselves as components in a system, and believing our duty is to help that system balance itself. Indeed, Curtis says, 'The underlying aim of the series is to make people aware that this has happened–and to try to recapture the optimistic potential of politics to change the world.'

The counterculture of the 1960s, the Californian hippies, took up the idea of the network society because they were disillusioned with politics and believed this alternative way of ordering the world was based on some natural order. So they formed communes that were non–hierarchical and self–regulating, disdaining politics and rejecting alliances. (Many of these hippy dropouts later took these ideas mainstream: they became the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who decided that computers could liberate everyone and save the world.)...

He draws a parallel with those 1970s communes. 'The experiments with them all failed, and quickly. What tore them apart was the very thing that was supposed to have been banished: power. Some people were more free than others – strong personalities dominated the weak, but the rules didn't allow any organised opposition to the suppression because that would be politics.' As in the commune, so in the world: 'These are the limitations of the self–organising system: it cannot deal with politics and power. And now we're all disillusioned with politics, and this machine–organising principle has risen up to be the ideology of our age.'"

(Katharine Viner, 6 May 2011, Guardian)

Episode 1: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: Love and Power', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 23 May 2011
Episode 2: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Use and Abuse of Vegetational Concepts', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 30 May 2011
Episode 3: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Monkey In The Machine and the Machine in the Monkey', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 06 June 2011

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1960s1970sabstract modelabstractionAdam Curtis • Alan Greenspan • All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace • archive footageAyn RandBBC2Bill MurrayblogsCarmen Hermosillochange • commune • computer model • computer utopianism • confessional memoirs • control societyconvergencecounterculturecultural expressioncyberspacedemocracydigital cultureecologyemotions become commodified • Esther Rantzen • evolution • expressions of power • Facebookfreedom • Georgia • global capitalism • hierarchical structures • hierarchies • hierarchy • hippy communes • hippy dropouts • hyper-consumerismideologyideology of the timeindividualisminternet utopianism • Kyrgyzstan • Loren Carpenter • machines • Mayfair Set • mercantilist economy • modern world • natural order • network ecologynetworked societynetworksnon-hierarchical • non-hierarchical societies • orderingPongpopular culture • punchdrunk • reflexive modernisationRichard Dawkinsscientific ideasself-organising systemself-regulating • self-regulating ecosystem • selfish gene theory • Silicon Valleysocial experimentssocial mediasocialist realismsociety • Soviet realism • stability • stable order • Stakhanovites • structuresystems theorytechnology convergencetelevision documentary • TUC • TwitterUkraineunderlying orderunstable • Westminster • White House • Zoe Williams

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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