Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'In-limbo' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 MARCH 2014

A portal to the underworld in Jean Cocteau's Orphée (1950)

"Jean Cocteau's update of the Orpheus myth depicts a famous poet (Jean Marais), scorned by the Left Bank youth, and his love for both his wife, Eurydice (Marie Déa), and a mysterious princess (Maria Casarès). Seeking inspiration, the poet follows the princess from the world of the living to the land of the dead, through Cocteau's famous mirrored portal. Orpheus's peerless visual poetry and dreamlike storytelling represent the legendary Cocteau at the height of his powers."

(The Criterion Collection)

1
2

3

4

TAGS

1950after deathafterlifeallegoryblack and whiteboundary-crossing • Classical mythology • contemplating mortality • Criterion Collection • deathdreamdreamlike storytellingEurydicefantasy about deathglass portalgloveheterotopiain-limboJean CocteauJean Marais • land of the dead • Left Bank youth • legendlove • love and death • love story • Maria Casares • Marie Dea • mirror • mirrored portal • mortalitymythOrphee (1950)Orpheus • Orpheus (1950) • Orpheus myth • otherworldlinessplaceless placeplacelessnesspoetportalprincessSFXspecial effectssurrealist cinemathreshold spaceunderworld • visual poetry • visual spectaclewaterwife • world of the living

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2012

What Dreams May Come: imagining a painted world through vfx

"Ward's 'What Dreams May Come,' starring Robin Williams was nominated for production design in addition to winning an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects. The film, tells an epic love story of soul mates separated by death. The story would inspire Ward to envision the afterlife as a painted world, incorporating state–of–the–art, adapted, and entirely new visual effects technologies in an original, fully articulated, filmic view of imagined realms that may await us after death."

(Saville Productions)

1
2

3

4

5

TAGS

1998after deathafterlifeallegory • Annabella Sciorra • Aotearoa New Zealandboundary-crossingcontemplating mortality • Cuba Gooding Jr. • deathdreamemotion • eternity • Eurydiceexpressionexpressionisticexternalisationfantasyfantasy about deathfictional worldfilmflowerflowersheavenhellin the mindin transitin-limbointernal quest • Joel Hynek • Josh Rosen • LIDARlifelove storymemorymilestonemortalitymoving paintingNew Zealand filmmaker • Nick Brooks • oozingOrpheusOscarpaintpaint our own surroundingspainted worldpainting • Pierre Jasmin • psychologyremembrance • representing emotions • Richard Matheson • Robin Williams • romantic love • Ronald Bass • Scott Huntsman • self-realisationSFXsoulmatesspecial effectssurrealisticthemethreshold spaceunderworldVFXVincent Wardvisceral experiencevisual effectsvisual metaphorvisual spectacle • What Dreams May Come (1998) • wifeworld of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Marham Karimi Nasseri: In-limbo

I am a citizen of Charles De Gaulle Airport. –Marham Karimi Nasseri
Due to a bureaucratic glitch a airline traveller, Mr Nasseri was trapped in the non–place of the transit lounge in the Charles De Gaulle Airport at Roissy, France. For 11 years Nasseri shaved and washed in the passenger facilities, and kept himself occupied watching the eb and flow of the airport traffic. Despite intentions to settle in London in 1988 he was forced to make–do in a bubble of fast–food stores and gift shops until being freed by the actions of a human rights lawyer in 1999.

1

TAGS

1988belongingbetweenborder/boundaryCharles de Gaulle Airport • check-point • conduit • customs control • flight-pathgateglobalisation • holidaymaker • hostage • in transitin-limboMarham Karimi Nasserinationalismneither here nor there • nether region • terrorismtransient • transit • transit-lounge • traveller
08 OCTOBER 2003

In-Transit: The Devil's Mode

"The character, Mr. Paxton in Anthony Burgess' novel The Devil's Mode has thrown away his passport after entering the nowhere of departure lounges and planes, filled his pockets with air tickets and is determined to spend the rest of his life in the nowhere and comfortable emptiness of planes and airports is, of course, a rather unusual personage –(Burgess, 1989).'God almighty,' I said. What he showed me was a large yellow plastic folder crammed with air tickets. He said, riffling through them: 'Going everywhere. Rio de Janeiro, Valparaiso, wherever that is, Mozambique, Sydney, Christchurch, Honolulu, Moscow. 'If there's one place where you'll need a visa, it's certainly Moscow,' I said. 'But, damn it, how do you propose to go anywhere without a passport?' There's going and going,' he said. 'When I get to one place then I start off right away for another. Well, in some cases not right away. There's a fair amount of waiting in some of the places. But they have what they call transit lounges. Get a wash and a brush–up. Perhaps a bath. Throw a dirty shirt away and buy a new one. Ditto for socks and underpants. No trouble, really. 'In effect,' I said, astonished, 'you'll be travelling without arriving. 'You could put it that way.' –(Burgess, 1989: 141).Burgess' character provides a clear demonstration of the cultural emptiness entailed in this peculiar expression of modernity. An uprooted man who had lost everything that connected him to the thick, rich meaning–contexts of ordinary life (he was retired, a widower, and his children had left home), he was intent on ending his days in the nowhere of air travel."

1

TAGS

1989 • cultural emptiness • in transitin-between zonein-limboliminal spacemeaning-contextsnowherepassportplaceless placeplacelessnessplaces • The Devils Mode • threshold space • transit lounge • travelling without arriving • visa
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.