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Which clippings match 'Technical Innovation' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 MAY 2014

Gabriel Tarde: The Laws of Imitation

TAGS

1903adaptation • beliefs and desires • biological conflict • changing environmentCharles Darwin • civic opinion • collective behaviour • creative associations • cultural innovations • diffusion of innovations • environmentally adaptive inventions • evolution of the species • extralogical factors • extralogical social factors • Francis GaltonGabriel Tarde • human innovation • imitation • intermental activity • international political • inventioninventiveness • mass communications • mass society theory • microsociologymorality • opposing ideas • opposing motivations • opposition • paths of imitation • pattern of activity • physical conflict • prestige hierarchy structures • psychological conflict • public opinion research • rational aspects of a culture • rational development • receptivity • social adjustments • social conflict • social consequencessocial interactionsocial invention • social patterns • social psychology • social system • social variables • societal change • sociologytechnical innovation • The Laws of Imitation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2013

The Invisible Inflatable Airbag Bicycle Helmet by Hövding

"Fredrik Gertten profiles two idealistic young female entrepreneurs who created a revolutionary 21st–century design object everyone told them would be impossible to fashion."

(Focus Forward Films, 2012)

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TAGS

2005 • airbag • Anna Haupt • auto inflatable • bicycle • bicycle helmet • bikebusiness womencollisioncrashcrash testcrashworthinessdesign innovationdesign studentsentrepreneurentrepreneurship • Focus Forward Films • Fredrik Gertten • GE Focus Forward • helmethighway safety • Hovding • industrial design • inflatable airbag bike helmet • invention • invisible bicycle helmet • Lund UniversityMasters studentsproduct designproduct designerprotectionprototyperoad safetysafetysafety by designSwedishtechnical innovation • Terese Alstin • The Swedish Film Institute • WG Film • women designerswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Kino-mo: computer generated adverts on bicycle wheels

"Old Bond is an award winning, independent creative agency that helps to promote forward thinking brands in an innovative and exciting way. We provide tailored solutions with our unique technology – a breakthrough in outdoor advertising"

(Old Bond London Ltd., UK)

[Kino-mo were previously 'Old Bond']

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TAGS

2012advertising display • Art Stavenka • bicyclebicycle wheelsbike • computer generated ads • display advertisingdisplay technology • Dragons Den • entrepreneurentrepreneurshipinvention • Kyril • Old Bond London Ltd. • outdoor advertisingpromotiontechnical innovation • UCL • UCL Bright Ideas Awards • UK • unique technology • University College London

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2012

What is Pervasive Media?

"For more than a decade, scientists have promised a world of devices and services that infuse the landscape of our daily lives with experiences that are designed to fit the needs of the situation. Beyond the laboratories, computing and communication technology has created a world in which people carry small, powerful, wireless computers and phones that are connected to the internet almost all of the time, from almost anywhere.

From gaming to outdoor displays, performance to public transport, pervasive media is delivered into the fabric of everyday life, tuned to the context at the moment of delivery. It sits at the emerging intersection of mobile computers, media technology, networks and sensors and offers significant opportunities for new types of digital media content and services, especially those linked to an awareness of place and location.

Pervasive Media is basically any experience that uses sensors and/or mobile/wireless networks to bring you content (film, music, images, a game...) that's sensitive to your situation – which could be where you are, how you feel, or who you are with. Oyster Cards are a simple pervasive device: so are audio guides at tourist attractions, which can give you extra information according to where you are and which bits you've been to already.

Pervasive Media is Digital Media delivered into the fabric of real life and based on the situational context at the moment of delivery"

(Pervasive Media Studio)

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TAGS

applied researchaudio guide • awareness of place • communication networkscommunication technology • computing technology • connected to the internet • contentconvergencedaily lives • devices and services • digital media • digital media content • digital media services • experiencesgamesinteraction design • location aware • mobile computers • mobile networks • moment of delivery • outdoor displays • Oyster Card • performance • pervasive device • pervasive media • Pervasive Media Studio • public transport • research centre • sensitive to your situation • sensorsituation • situational context • technical innovationtechnologytourist attractionsUniversity of Bristol • University of West of England • Watershed (cinema) • where you are • wireless computers • wireless networks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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