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Which clippings match 'Hip-hop Backbeat' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Rap & Hip-Hop was born in 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue

"Hip-hop music is generally considered to have been pioneered in New York's South Bronx in 1973 by Jamaican-born Kool DJ Herc. At a Halloween dance party thrown by his younger sister, Herc used an innovative turntable technique to stretch a song's drum break by playing the break portion of two identical records consecutively. The popularity of the extended break lent its name to 'breakdancing'--a style specific to hip-hop culture, which was facilitated by extended drumbreaks played by DJs at New York dance parties. By the mid-1970s, New York's hip-hop scene was dominated by seminal turntablists DJ Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Herc. The rappers of Sugarhill Gang produced hip-hop's first commercially successful hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' in 1979'.

Rap itself--the rhymes spoken over hip-hop music--began as a commentary on the ability--or 'skillz'--of a particular DJ while that DJ was playing records at a hip-hop event. MCs, the forerunners of today's rap artists, introduced DJs and their songs and often recognized the presence of friends in the audience at hip-hop performances. Their role was carved out by popular African-American radio disc jockeys in New York during the latel96Os, who introduced songs and artists with spontaneous rhymes. The innovation of MCs caught the attention of hip-hop fans. Their rhymes lapped over from the transition period between the end of one song and the introduction of the next to the songs themselves. Their commentaries moved solely from a DJ's skillz to their own personal experiences and stories. The role of MCs in performances rose steadily, and they began to be recognized as artists in their own right [2].

The local popularity of the rhythmic music served by DJs at dance parties and clubs, combined with an increase in 'b-boys'--breakdancers--and graffiti artists and the growing importance of MCs, created a distinctive culture known as hip-hop. For the most part, hip-hop culture was defined and embraced by young, urban, working-class African-Americans. Hip-hop music originated from a combination of traditionally African-American forms of music--including jazz, soul, gospel, and reggae. It was created by working-class African-Americans, who, like Herc, took advantage of available tools--vinyl records and turntables--to invent a new form of music that both expressed and shaped the culture of black New York City youth in the 1970s."

(Becky Blanchard, 1999)

2). Information on MCs drawn from the University of Maryland's "Mcing: The Past" and "MCing: The Present" in "A Brief History of Hip-Hop Culture"

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TAGS

1970s1973African AmericanAfrika Bambaataaappropriation • b-boys • b-girls • Becky Blanchard • black culture • block party • break dancing • breakbeat • breakdance • breakdancing • Cindy Campbell • civil rights movement • Clive Campbell • cultural expression • dance party • DJ • DJ Grandmaster Flash • DJing • extended break • gospel • graffiti art • graffiti artists • Grandmaster Flash • hip-hophip-hop backbeat • hip-hop culture • hip-hop music • hip-hop performance • hip-hop scene • jazz • Kool DJ Herc • l960s • MC • MCing • music history • musical form • New York City • radio disc jockey • rap • rap artist • rap music • rapperreggae • rhyme • rhythmic music • Sedgwick Avenue • skillz • soul • South Bronx • spoken word • Sugarhill Gang • turntable • turntable technique • turntablist • vinyl record • West Bronx • working classworking class cultureyouth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2011

Mashup 101: product placement via fake cable access show

"To the world this was a cable access arts and crafts show where an 89–year old hip woman known as Sue Teller taught her audience 'how to make something new from something old.'

The show did not only function as a really subtle product placement advertising campaign for Mountain Dew, it also promoted DIY user–friendly technologies and social networking. Not to mention recycling as a mayor green trend, without ever mentioning the word green. Now that is clever marketing!

It was created by Ecopop in response to the rising interest in DIY principles."

(Trend Hunter Inc., 24 October 2008)

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2007advertising campaignbackbeat • cable access • configurable culture • DIY • DIY principles • do your own adventure • Ecopop • fideo • Flight of the Bumblebee • GrannyGirl15 • greenhip-hophip-hop backbeathow to • how to make something new from something old • LonelyGirl15mash-up • Mashup 101 • Mountain Dew • MySpaceoctogenarianproduct placementrecyclingsocial networkingstealth marketing • Sue Teller • TV Show • user-friendly technologies • viralviral marketingYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2009

Can I Get An Amen?

"Can I Get An Amen? is an audio installation that unfolds a critical perspective of perhaps the most sampled drum beat in the history of recorded music, the Amen Break. It begins with the pop track Amen Brother by 60's soul band The Winstons, and traces the transformation of their drum solo from its original context as part of a 'B' side vinyl single into its use as a key aural ingredient in contemporary cultural expression. The work attempts to bring into scrutiny the techno–utopian notion that 'information wants to be free'– it questions its effectiveness as a democratizing agent. This as well as other issues are foregrounded through a history of the Amen Break and its peculiar relationship to current copyright law."

(Nate Harrison)

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19692004 • Amen Break • art and creativity • audio • audio installation • authorship • b-side • backbeatbreakbeatcopyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonscritical perspectivecultural expression • cultural ownership • culturedemocratisationdigital culturedrum beat • drum sample • drum solo • drum-and-bass • hip-hophip-hop backbeathistoryinformation wants to be freeinnovation • jungle music • musicmusic clip • Nate Harrison • ownershippiracyremixremix culturesampledsampler • soul band • soundsubculturetechnology • The Winstons • turntablevinyl record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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