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Which clippings match 'Immersion' keyword pg.1 of 5
19 JANUARY 2016

Korean video gamers tend to play collectively (not individually)

"Indigenous video game culture creates a game space that Korean gamers use to construct their digital national identity. To Korean gamers, the concept of a digital Korea represents an imaginary space of Korean community where people play games together. Unlike gamers in the United States and Japan, whose gaming experience tends to be individualized, Korea's indigenous video game culture represents a new form of youth culture that allows young gamers to engage in social interaction through gaming with friends at PC Bangs. In this culture, entertainment happens at the moment when gamers are able to 'shout and play games together.' [29] This experience of social gaming creates a particular taste of gameplay that also leads to further immersion in a gaming narrative particular to most Korean gamers (Ok 2011). It is said that Korea is a mad gaming nation (Ahonen and O'Reilly 2007), and the country has the highest penetration rate for a single online game; 12 million South Koreans have driven a car in the Nexon online game Crazyracing Kartrider (2004). In addition to social gameplay within the Korean community, nation-building sentiments also arise in the context of Korean player-killing, where Korean gamers engage in social gaming on the international servers of an online game. [30] Thomas (2008) describes such gameplay as a cultural location that reflects existing racial tensions between Korean and American gamers. Similarly, political tension also appeared in a game massacre event, when Chinese gamers hacked into a Korean server and sparked mass killing between Chinese and Korean gamers in Legend of Mir II (2001).

On a macro level, gaming as a national pastime can be seen in the rapid spread of e-sports in all aspects of Korean society, and this e-sport culture is an indigenous gaming culture that receives support from the government, media institutions, and passionate gamers. E-sports have become recognized as an international sports phenomenon with their origins in Korea. With their emphasis on professional gamers, they have also become an emerging new media phenomenon, an international spectacle in video games (Jin 2010)."

(Mark J. P. Wolf, p.509)

Wolf, M. J. P. (2015). "Video Games Around the World", The MIT Press.

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2015 • Chinese gamer • collective behaviourcollectivism • Crazyracing Kartrider • cultural location • digital national identity • e-sport culture • e-sports • game massacre event • gameplaygames research • gaming experience • gaming narrative • gaming nation • Hye Ryoung Ok • imaginary spacesimmersion • indigenous gaming culture • indigenous video game culture • international sports phenomenon • Jim OReilly • Korean community • Korean gamer • Korean society • LAN gaming • Legend of Mir 2 • Mark Wolf • mass collaboration • mass killing • multiplayer computer games • nation-building • national pastime • new media phenomenon • PC bang • people play games together • play games together • political tension • professional gamer • racial tensions • shared context • social gameplay • social gaming • social interaction • social interaction through gaming • South Korea • Tomi Ahonen • video game culture • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2015

Build your own (smartphone enabled) cardboard Oculus Rift

"In the past week or so, you've probably heard about Google Cardboard, Google's lovably wry answer to the Oculus Rift. The Rift, of course, is a gadget that has gotten millions of dollars in funding and a multi–billion dollar Facebook buyout, and will cost hundreds of dollars at launch. Google Cardboard is a piece of cardboard with a couple of special lenses and a place to put a smartphone. Snickers and high fives were no doubt had.

The cool thing is that Google Cardboard is no joke—the rig actually provides a virtual reality experience when you use it with a smartphone and the Cardboard app. Well, now you can get a knock–off cardboard VR rig, and yes, we're living in a time when that's a real thing."

(Helena Stone, 30 September 2014, Chip Chick)

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2014accessible designassembly instructionscardboard • Cardboard app • cardboard headset • CardboardSDK iOS • Chrome VR Experiments • Damien Henry • David Coz • DIYDIY craftsfolded paper designfreely available • Google Cardboard • Google Cardboard SDK • Google I/O • head-tracking • head-worn display • headset • immersionimmersive experience • immersive virtual reality • iOS 8 • magnetometer • mobile VR headset • Oculus Rift • open development • OpenGLschematic diagramsmartphonestereoscopic • stereoscopic display software • ultra-low-techvirtual realityvirtual reality experienceVRVR headsetwearable devicesWebGL

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
26 SEPTEMBER 2014

Rethinking Intermediality in the Digital Age

"In the past decades 'intermediality' has proved to be one of the most productive terms in the domain of humanities. Although the ideas regarding media connections may be traced back to the poetics of the Romantics or even further back in time, it was the accelerated multiplication of media themselves becoming our daily experience in the second half of the twentieth century that propelled the term to a wide attention in a great number of fields (communication and cultural studies, philosophy, theories of literature and music, art history, cinema studies, etc.) where it generated an impressive number of analyses and theoretical discussions. 'Intermediality is in' ('Intermedialität ist in'), declared one of its pioneering theorists, Joachim Paech, at the end of the 1990s. However, we may also note, that since then other theoretical approaches introduced even newer perspectives that have not only revitalized the study of media phenomena in general but have specifically targeted the emerging new problematics raised by the new electronic media. Facing the challenge of the daily experiences of the digital age, discussions of media differences or 'dialogues' highlighting the 'inter,' the 'gap,' the 'in–between,' the 'incommensurability' between media are currently being replaced by discourses of the 'enter' or 'immersion,' and the 'network logic' of a 'convergence culture' in which we have a 'free flow of content over different media platforms' (Henry Jenkins). At the same time the turn towards the corporeality of perception in all aspects of communication has also shifted the attention from the 'interaction of media' towards the 'interaction with media,' from the idea of 'media borders' towards the analysis of the blurring of perception between media and reality, of humans and machines – media being perceived more and more not as a form of representation but as an environment and as a means to 'augment' reality."

The inaugural conference of ISIS (International Society for Intermedial Studies / former NorSIS) Cluj–Napoca, October 24–26, 2013. Conference venue: Sapientia University, Calea Turzii nr. 4.

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2013 • augment reality • augmented reality • between media • Cluj-Napoca • convergence culture • corporeality of perception • digital age • discussions of media differences • emerging new problematics • form of representation • Henry Jenkinshumans and machinesimmersion • incommensurability • interaction of media • interaction with media • intermediality • International Society for Intermedial Studies • Joachim Paech • Marie-Laure Ryan • media and reality • media borders • media phenomena • media platforms • multiple delivery platforms • multiplication of media • narrative theory • network logic • new electronic media • Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvaniatransmedia storytelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JUNE 2013

Lady in the Lake: the dramatic effect of subjective point of view

"Robert Montgomery drehte 'Lady in the Lake' 1947 nach einem Plot, das Raymond Chandlers gleichnamigen Roman adaptierte. In diesem Spielfilm verfolgen Beobachter die Handlung aus der Perspektive des Detektivs Philip Marlowe: Personen, die sich Marlowe zuwenden und mit ihm sprechen, wenden sich der Kamera zu. Das wirkt in Filmvorführungen im Kino, als wenden sie sich in den Projektionsraum und sprechen die Zuschauer an. Der Beobachter wird zugleich ins Bildgeschehen durch die szenische Konstellation hineingezogen (Immersion), wie auf die Grenze zwischen Filmraum und Projektionsraum verwiesen, da er im Filmraum nicht selbst handeln kann, sich aber wie Marlowe im Bildraum verortet. Marlowe bleibt ein anderer, meist unsichtbarer Körper, der aber sieht und den Anschluss des Beobachters an seine Wahrnehmung einfordert: Die Kamera verleiht ihren Beobachtern einen szenischen Kontext, in den Kinozuschauer sich versetzen können. Sie stossen dabei sowohl auf Vorgaben (wie Marlowe spricht) wie auf Fehlstellen (das Sichtbare von Marlowes Auftreten, wenn er nicht in einen Spiegel schaut)."

(Thomas Dreher, IASLonline)

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1947 • Audrey Totter • black and whitecamera anglecinematic conventionscinematic language • cinematic space • crime fictiondetective storyfilm languagefilm noirfirst-person point of viewformal conceit • hardboiled • hardboiled detective • IASLonline • immersionLady in the Lake (1947)perspective view • Philip Marlowe • point of viewPOV • Raymond Chandler • Robert Montgomery • screen space • subjective shot • subjective viewpoint • visual conceit • visual depictionvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

5D Institute: The Future of Immersive Design

"5D Institute is a cutting edge USC non–profit Organized Research Unit dedicated to the dissemination, education, and appreciation of the future of narrative media through World Building.

World Building is the interdisciplinary process of building worlds that evolve into containers for the new narrative resolutions. World Building is the intersection of creativity and technology for students in academia and industry who need to understand now how to thrive in the media jungle of the future. World Building works beyond the edges of known media to express the full arc of our creative role in making new narrative worlds.

5D Institute is the world's leading World Building collective. Our network of preeminent World Builders transcends borders and boundaries in film, animation, fashion, gaming, theatre, television, music, architecture, science, interactive media and more.

Through the newly cemented partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts, 5D Institute is evolving into an unmatched connector between the next generation of young and undiscovered creators traversing the bleeding edge of innovation and companies who want to be at the frontlines of the new media landscape.

Since Oct 2008, we have come together at 5D's distributed events to engage in a disruptive interrogation of our fractured disciplines, to create best practices and a new shared language across narrative media."

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2008 • 5D Institute • arts and technology • beyond the edges of known media • building worlds • building worlds that evolve • creativity and technology • disruptive interrogation • distributed events • evolving experiencefilm and animation • fractured disciplines • immersion • immersive design • immersive environmentsimmersive experienceinteractive media • interdisciplinary process • narrative media • new media landscape • new narrative resolutions • new narrative worlds • Organized Research Unit • playfulnessshared language • the future of narrative media • University of Southern California • USC School of Cinematic Arts • world building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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