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Which clippings match 'Arts And Crafts' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 JUNE 2012

Design + Culture: A Return to Fundamentalism?

"whilst the application of design is multiplying exponentially, it is also loosing its validity as an authentic cultural icon. It has become synonymous with cloning the face of global culture itself, more often representing the uniformity of mass globalisation, rather than reflecting the facets of cultural difference and diversity.

The cultural attributes of difference and diversity have been fundamentally weakened, and like face that has undergone cosmetic surgery, the result is a facsimile vaguely familiar but disturbingly without a true sense of identity. It is everyone's and no one's, and belongs in no single place more than another. ...

Design has become omnipresent within Culture, as it has been adopted as a convenient badge to add value and market commodity, and to signify identity. Following Designer era of 1980's, the added value of design was replaced by design as cultural value, embodied in leading Brands of the 1990's. ...

in the 21st Century the task of capturing Culture has become more and more difficult in terms of expressing culture through the medium of design. Design increasingly struggles for a clear sense of definition, and one is left asking, what can Culture really mean today, if it is no longer tied to consumer lifestyle? We remain in a post–contemporary state where we require a redefinition of meaning, value and identity. ...

The uncertainty of a designed fusion Culture has replaced the certainty of traditional cultural monoculture. Which in turn has been diluted by an obsession with 'cultural materialism'. What remains of the original cultural sources are being plundered in order to restock our lack of creative DNA. The net result is an erosion of the remaining authentic sources, but also the creation of a 'cultural time lag' which has been generated by a convergence of trans–cultural fusions, hybridisation, and of recurrent cultural cross referencing."

(David Carlson on 21 Mar 21 2011, David Report)

Fig.1 paper sculptures made by Jennifer Collier [http://jennifercollier.co.uk/].

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TAGS

1980199021st centuryadded valueadded value through designaestheticisationapplication of designart and design doctrinearts and craftsauthentic cultural iconauthentic materials • authentic sources • authenticityconsumer brandsconsumer lifestyles • cosmetic surgery • craftcraft nostalgiacreative fundamentalismcreativitycultural cross referencingcultural identitycultural materialismcultural monoculturedecorationderivativedesign • design as cultural value • design craftdesign essentialismdesign fundamentalismdesign innovationdesign revisionism • difference and diversity • expressing culture • global culture • globalisationhomogenizationhybridisationlegitimacymarket commodity • mass globalisation • monoculturenostalgia • original cultural sources • post-contemporary • post-traditional • redefinition of meaning • sewn typography • traditional cultural monoculture • trans-cultural fusions • trendsuniformityvalidityvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2010

Computational Studio Arts: the new crafts

"Goldsmiths' Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Computational Studio Arts can be described as 'smart crafting'. Four students talk about their work in this exciting new field of study.

[Janis Jeffries, Professor of Visual Arts in the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths explains] 'this is the first year of graduating students in the MFA in Computational Studio Arts. It's the first programme within the University of London which is very much about hands–on programming skills as what you might call 'the new crafts'. ...

'Because of the dynamic relationship between art, science and technology, probably some of the most interesting shows are now at the Science Museum and the Wellcome Foundation. They're really pressurising the conventions of the art world because people are much more engaged.'"

(Laura Taflinger, Creative Choices, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2008

William Morris and The Arts and Crafts Movement

"Along with Morris's social awakening came a developing of his ideas for combining the skills of the artist with those of the craftsman, with equal recognition for the talents of both. Though the term Arts and Crafts Movement was not coined until 1887, the main tenet of breaking down the hierarchy of art, which elevates painting and sculpture, above that of, traditional crafts and design, were championed by Morris, Burne–Jones, and Ruskin much earlier; some consider the Red House as being the first application of these theories. Key to the ideas of the Arts and Crafts movement was that artistic or beautiful objects should not be just for those who could afford them, Morris proclaimed, 'I do not want art for the few, any more than I want education for the few, or freedom for the few'."
(Kenny McEwan)

[William Morris wallpaper featuring acanthus leaves, c. 1875.]

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TAGS

1887aestheticisationaestheticsartart and design doctrinearts and craftsArts and Crafts MovementcraftdecorationdesignEdward Burne-Jonesfreedom • Frontline • hierarchyJohn Ruskinjournallegitimacymagazineobjectspaintingpioneer • Red House • sculptureskill • socialism • UKWilliam Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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