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Which clippings match 'Scientific Illustration' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 JUNE 2015

Passive digital experience forms backdrop to annual trade convention

"Working with with illustrator and Art Director Katie Scott, we created an unique 15m x 3.5m animated wallpaper that slowly evolved over a 4 hour period. Created for Pernod Ricards' annual creative meeting on the private island of Embiez in the south of France and installed by Paris based Events agency Auditoire. The installation became a passive digital experience that functioned as a thought provoking backdrop to the schedule of creative speakers. Using 'Foley' artist Michael to create the audio effect and Lewis and myself to create the animation we were able to take Katie's illustration into an animated form, and her unique world became an animated experience."

(Christopher Pearson)

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20132D animation • advertising convention • aesthetic spectacleambient artanatomiesanimal physiologyanimated experienceanimated painting • animated wallpaper • annual convention • Auditoire (events agency) • backdropbiomedical illustration • Christopher Pearson • corporate events • creative meeting • Embiez • energizing corporate cultureevents design • experiential advertising • foley artist • immersive experience • Katie Scott • large scale installation • Lewis White • Michael Floyd • passive digital experience • Pernod Ricard • physiologyphytotomyplant anatomy • private island • sceneryscientific illustrationsouth of Francetrade conventionvideo muralvisual spectaclewomen illustrators

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2015

Edward Tufte: Envisioning Information



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chartscolour • colour and information • complex data • computer interfaces • courtroom exhibits • diagrammatic visualisationdiagramsEdward Tufte • Envisioning Information (1990) • escaping flatland • Flatland (1884)guidebook • how to explain complex material • information designinformation designer • information display • mappingpop-up booksscientific illustration • scientific presentations • sensemakingstatistical graphicsstatistical informationstereo photographytimetable • visual means

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2013

Marianne North: pioneering botanical artist

"Victorian artist Marianne North, one of the only women of her time to travel to places like the Seychelles Islands, Australia, and Chile, and who left behind a trail of impressive art and writing about her botanical discoveries, is not a household name. ...

In 1871, when a 40–year–old North set out after the death of her father to travel around the world and to paint as many of world's flora in oils as possible, she unwittingly found herself both ahead of and behind her times. In the art world, she was definitely not part of the avant–garde; in France, Claude Monet and Pierre–Auguste Renoir had already started their Impressionist paintings, creating works that were worlds away from the status quo of a polished depiction of nature.

North went around the world twice, in fifteen years, traveling by train, boat, mule, and on foot, to every continent, except for Antarctica. In Brazil, where she spent 13 months, North painted lush landscapes and tropical flowers with tight brushstrokes and clean lines – a style that would soon be left behind with the revolutionary style of the Impressionists. North didn't perceive or paint her subjects in a particularly unique way, but she relayed every minute detail of a plant, flower, or landscape with breathtaking precision. Her paintings give you a straight, dispassionate look at an unfamiliar world."

(Alexia Nader, Garden Design)

Fig.1 Marianne North, New Zealand Flowers and Fruit, Date painted: early 1880s, Oil on board, 50.9 x 35.4 cm, Collection: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

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187119th centuryaccuracyAotearoa New ZealandartistAustraliabiodiversity • botanical artist • botanical record • BrazilCaliforniaCharles DarwinChiledepiction • dispassionate look • Edward Lear • fidelityfloragarden design • George Eliot • IndiaJapanKew Gardens • Marianne North • natural history • natural landscape • nature • non-European species • Origin of Speciespainting • painting nature • phytotomypioneering womenplant anatomyplantsscientific illustrationscientific illustrator • Seychelles • Seychelles Islands • travel • travel writing • travelogue • tropical plants • UK • unfamiliar world • Victorian art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2012

Thomas Allen: whimsical pulp fiction cut-outs

"Playing the role of scientist, [Thomas] Allen enlists mid 20th–century books on the natural phenomenon of science(astronomy, physics, electricity, biology) and presents his research as if through the eyes of his 8–year old daughter. How would she understand and portray these theories and absolutes of science?

Allen's signature use of cutting and repurposing book illustrations has not vanished. Instead of the pulp fiction genre, Allen plays with 50's era versions of clean cut youths and domesticated moms. His unmistakable talent for creating the illusion of 3D in photography with his deft cuts and crimps, establishes a magical world in which a boy and girl play tag creating their own kind of electricity, a milkman makes a very special delivery in space, young toughs play marbles with the solar system and a mother busily sews her own version of 'string theory.'"

(Foley Gallery, 2012, New York NY)

Fig.1 Bearings, 2012. Fig.2 Eclipsed, 2012.

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1950s201220th century2Dartistastronomybiologybookbook illustrations • clean cut • compositioncut-out • cut-out characters • cut-out illustration • cuts and crimps • design craftdomesticatedelectricityexhibition • Foley Gallery • gallerymagical worldmid 20th-century • natural phenomenon • physicspop-uppulp fictionrepurposingsciencescientific illustrationshallow depth of field • theories and absolutes of science • Thomas Allen • through the eyes • vintage books • whimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Scientific illustrations depict scientifically important features

"As a scientific illustrator, one must be able to convey a detailed, clear and accurate depiction of a specimen. Scientific illustrations are an important part of the documentation that makes a specimen museum–quality – along with field and research notes, accession records, photographs, and correspondence about the specimen. A scientific illustration captures information about a plant or animal, information that is often missing from the museum specimen. Scientific illustrations depict the scientifically important features of the organism being studied. They often also describe that organism's natural environment."

(National Museum of American History)

Fig.1 George Venable (1992). Drawing of a Carabid beetle from South America, created for the research of Dr. Terry L. Erwin of the Department of Entomology, courtesy of the Entomology Illustration Archive, NMNH

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accession records • accuracy • animal information • biomedical illustrationdetailed drawingdocumentationentomology • Entomology Illustration Archive • fidelity • field notes • George Venable • illustrationillustration to visually communicate informationinterpretation • museum specimen • National Museum of American Historynatural environmentorganismplant information • research notes • sciencescientific illustrationscientific illustratorscientific visualisation • scientifically important features • scientistsSmithsonian Institutespecimenvisual depictionvisual fidelityvisual representationvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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