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Which clippings match 'Terminology' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Cafés: hybrids involving analogue and digital, virtual and real

"Terms like 'Internet café' or 'cybercafé' bring us right back to the 90s along with phrases like 'web page' or 'digital divide', which were invented to describe new hybrids involving analog and digital, virtual and real as well as the present and near future.

It's not that these terms have grown obsolete. It's rather that these 20th–century phenomena they once described have outgrown their terminology. They were born as metaphors, but over time turned into idioms, and their analog parts were the first [to] lose their original meanings. People who did not witness the emergence of the web do not fully understand why browser content is still called a 'page'. It's has also become unclear what public internet access facilities have in common with cafés, yet we continue calling them 'internet cafés' or 'cybercafés'."

(Olia Lialina, 2012–01–10)

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1990s20th century20th century phenomenaanalogue and digitalarchaeology • Bart Plantenga • browser content • cafecafescyber archaeology • cybercafe • cybercafes • cyberculture • Danja Vasiliev • digital archaeologydigital culturedigital divideDragan Espenschiedemergence of the web • Florian Cramer • Goethe Institute • Goethe-Instituthistoryhome pagehybrid formidiomInternetinternet archaeology • internet cafe • internet cafes • inventionJODI (art collective) • Leslie Robbins • metaphor • near future • new cosmopolitanism • new hybrids • obsolescenceOlia Lialina • original meaning • outgrownpage metaphorphenomenaphenomenonPiet Zwart Institute • Piet Zwart Institute Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University • public internet access • Renee Turner • Rotterdam • Rotterdam University • terminologythe pastvirtual and realwebweb pages • Wendelien van Oldenborgh • Willem de Kooning Academy • www

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Integrated media might have been a better description than multimedia

"Multimedia of course is a strange word; media is already a plural and adding multi to it didnt help much. Integrated media might have been better but the word has a very brief life and has already burned brightly in its supernova stage before being consigned to the same bin as many of the other techie words that once seemed so important in our computer lives. Multimedia only seemed imortant as a word when few computers offered the capability that the word seemed to describe. When every computer offers multimedia capability (as will rapidly become the norm) the word will die for ever. No one seriously describes life as a multimedia experience, although it is, but we do have special words to describe our lives where key information elements are missing – sensory deprivation, blindness, deafness, dyslexia. In the same way, a text based, command driven computer might well be described as visually impaired and mute. In our everyday lives, missing any of the multiple media components that comprise our normal information channels will be characterised as exceptional. In our computing lives (in 1994 at least) the multimedia computer, with most of those multiple media components in place, is seen as the exception, worthy of special terminology."

(Stephen Heppell, BBC 1995)

[Of course the truth in Heppell's critique relates to the narrow definition of multimedia as an integrative technology and presentation mode. The critique fails to recognise alternative definitions directed towards more complex social and cultural exchanges facilitated through multimedia means.]

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1994disciplinary classification • integrated media • knowledge territorialisationmediamultimedia • multimedia capability • multimedia computer • multimedia experience • multiple media • multiple media components • our computer lives • Stephen Heppell • supernova stage • techie words • terminologyweak classification

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2009

The UK Arts and Humanities Research Council definition of research

"The AHRC definition of research, which is primarily concerned with research processes, rather than outputs, specifies four common issues which can be summarised as: the research problem to be addressed; context and field of inquiry; methods employed; and dissemination of results (AHRC, 2003)."

(Kristina Niedderer and Seymour Roworth–Stokes, p.13)

Niedderer, K. and S. Roworth–Stokes. (2007). "The Role and Use of Creative Practice in Research and its Contribution to Knowledge". IASDR International Conference 2007. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

AHRC (2003), The RAE and Research in the Creative & Performing Arts; response to the funding councils review of research assessment, AHRC, Bristol.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 FEBRUARY 2004

Wiki: Information Publishing and Linking Software

"A WikiWikiWeb enables documents to be authored collectively in a simple markup language using a web browser. Because most wikis are web–based, the term 'wiki' is usually sufficient. A single page in a wiki is referred to as a 'wiki page', while the entire body of pages, which are usually highly interconnected, is called 'the wiki'.'Wiki wiki' means 'fast' in the Hawaiian language, and it is the speed of creating and updating pages that is one of the defining aspects of wiki technology. Generally, there is no prior review before modifications are accepted, and most wikis are open to the general public or at least to all persons who also have access to the wiki server. In fact, even registration of a user account is not often required."

Wikipedia (01–02–2004)

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2004 • calque • definitions • dense linking • etymology • Hawaiianhyperlinkedinformation in contextinformation networkintertwingularitylinking structure • MediaWiki • new technologyrhizomatic associationsrhizomatic structurerhizomorphousterminologywikiWikipedia • WikiWikiWeb • WikkaWiki
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