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19 AUGUST 2014

Animated Women UK: positively supporting, representing, celebrating and encouraging women in the UK animation and visual effects (VFX) industries

"We want women from all backgrounds of the industry and at every stage in their career to fulfil their potential and realise their dreams. We value openness, honesty and a positive approach towards collaborating with women and mean across the UK to achieve our mission.

Our vision is to see a change in the UK's animation and VFX industries. We want to support a network of women who can help each other achieve success at every stage of the animation or VFX pipeline. This change will be visible when we see results such as: better female characters on screen, an increase in women–led start–ups and an increase in women winning awards in technical areas."

TAGS

2013 • Animated Women UK • animation and VFX • animation industrycreative industriescreative networksdesign professionalsdesign showcase • female animators • female characters • Lindsay Watson • London International Animation Festival • mentoring • Mind Candy • MPC (Moving Picture Company) • network of women • networking events • professional networking • professional supportrecognition of womenUKUK animationVFX industriesvisual effects designvisual effects industrywomen designerswomen in animationwomen in designwomen in film • Women in Film and TV • women in technical areas • women in technologywomen in the film industry • women in visual effects • women winning awards • women-led start-ups • workshop for women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 FEBRUARY 2014

Life After Pi: a plea to change practices deemed unsustainable in the VFX industry

"In February of 2013, John Hughes, founder of Rhythm & Hues Studios, regretfully announced that the company was going bankrupt. With no way to pay his hard working employees, and no other options, hundreds were laid off. Two weeks later, they won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects for 'Life of Pi.'

These were tragic, ironic times, and as employees, we were compelled to document it. As the bankruptcy finalized and layoffs continued, we began filming–watching helplessly as one of the most prestigious VFX companies in the world crumbled. As we all asked how this could happen, many stood up in outrage, sounding the alarm that this incident was not an isolated event, but a reflection of greater problems.

The old model of the movie business is passing away, yet modern–day Hollywood grips it ever more tightly. VFX companies and artists are treated as mere cogs in the machine, with little regard to creating a sustainable, collaborative working relationship. This will lead not only to the demise of more VFX companies, but to increasing instability industry wide.

Rhythm & Hues reached new heights in visual effects mastery with its stunning work on 'Life of Pi,' yet they still fell into bankruptcy.

'Life After Pi' reveals the behind–the–scenes factors that led to this sad and unforgettable moment in the history of Hollywood."

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TAGS

2013Academy Award • bankruptcy • behind-the-scenesdesign industrydesign professionalsHollywood • John Hughes • Life of Pi (2012) • masterymovie business • production model • redundancy • Rhythm and Hues Studios • sounding the alarm • sustainable practicesustainable production practicestransforming workplaces • unsustainable pattern of production • unsustainable practices • VFXVFX industriesvisual effectsvisual effects industryworking practices of designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Jonathan Hearn
05 DECEMBER 2013

Interaction Design Education Summit 2014

Wednesday, 5 February 2014, Utrecht School of the Arts (HKU) at Hilversum (http://interaction14.ixda.org/venues/).

"At a moment in time where everybody and everything is constantly interacting – through the use of networks, apps, products, media and services – educating students to design these interactions is not only needed, but also a fundamental challenge. Rapid developments in society and technology put increasingly high demands on the knowledge and skills of future interaction designers. Challenging traditional institutions, some companies have started programs for in–house training. At the same time, alternative educational platforms – such as edX, Udacity and Interaction–Design.org – are offering open access to high–level learning materials.

To successfully address these developments, interaction design education might need to reinvent itself."

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TAGS

2014alternative educational models • alternative educational platforms • Amsterdamapprenticeship • Daniel Rosenberg • Delftdesign educationdesign professionalsdesign schoolse-learning • educating students • education summit • edX • Fred Beecher • Gillian Crampton Smith • Hilversum • HKU Games and Interaction • HKU Hilversum • in-house training • interaction designInteraction Design Association (IxDA)interaction design educationInteraction Design Foundationinteraction designers • Interaction14 • interactions • interactive dialogue • IxDA • Jared Spool • knowledge and skillslearning materials • media and services • new forms of apprenticeship • online coursesonline education servicesonline learningonline portfolioonline presenceopen accessopen online coursesprofessional developmentrapid changethe future • traditional institutions • TU Delft Design for Interaction • UdacityUtrechtUtrecht School of the Arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
29 JUNE 2013

PATHWAYS AND GATEWAYS: the structure and regulation of UK architectural education

"Architectural education has proved to be a valuable part of UK higher education in the last fifty years and it has developed a strong international reputation for excellence in both teaching and research. The recent changes to higher education funding and the changing nature of professional practice have contributed to an evolving environment for UK architectural education where flexibility and innovation are increasingly important factors for continuing success. Revisions to the European Union requirements for architectural education are also contributing to this changing and uncertain environment. It has become clear to many of those most closely involved in UK architectural education that if the sector is to continue to develop and flourish some change in its regulatory framework is required in order that adequate responses can evolve and be encouraged.

The title of the report refers to the principal elements of the regulatory framework. The term 'pathway' is used to describe the route taken to registration and the term 'gateway' is used to describe thresholds through which candidates must pass in order to gain entry into the profession. This preliminary report seeks to summarise the context in which UK architectural education operates and to suggest proposals for reform which can hopefully gather support across the full spectrum of stakeholders. The intention of the Review Group is to publish a final report by October 2013."

(The UK Architectural Education Review Group, April 2013)

TAGS

2013architectural educationarchitectural pedagogyarchitectural practicearchitecture designarchitecture schools • career pathway • changing environmentchanging needschanging timescreative industriesdesign careerdesign industrydesign professionalsEuropean Unionflexibility and innovationhigher education • higher education funding • international reputation • professionprofessional certificationprofessional practiceprofessionalisationregulatory frameworkreport • SCHOSA • Standing Conference of Heads of Schools of Architecture • teaching and researchtuition feesUK • UK Architectural Education Review Group • uncertain environment • vertical discourses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JUNE 2013

The British Interactive Media Association

"British Interactive Media Company (BIMA) is the industry association representing the interactive media and digital content sector. It supports individuals and organizations which deliver high quality, creative and innovative, interactive media solutions. It strives to stimulate commercial growth, and acts as an industry liaison with academia and government through the provision of knowledge, encouragement and economy; BIMA is a united voice for its members and strives to develop an internationally competitive new media industry in Britain."

(CrunchBase)

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TAGS

1985 • BIMA • Britain • British Interactive Media Association • creative industriescreative mediacreative media industriesdesign associationdesign professiondesign professionalsdesign sector • digital content sector • digital industries • digital technology • Henry Carroll • industry association • industry liaison • interactive media • interactive media solutions • knowledge-based economymembership • new media industry • professional association for designprofessional bodytechnologyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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