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Which clippings match 'Iterative Design Process' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

Agile Software Development: what we've learned at Forty

"The general idea behind Agile is that instead of arguing about the wording of a requirements document written three months earlier with little perspective into the current situation, it's often healthier to acknowledge that the project is going to be flexible and evolving, and put processes in place that allow it to be that way.

Barely over 200 words, that manifesto become the foundation for a movement that has changed the world of software development forever. Endless writing and speaking has explored the various ways the manifesto could be interpreted, and many specific frameworks and methodologies (such as Extreme Programming, Kanban, Lean, and Scrum) have been developed to formalize its principles. A whole 'Agile industry' has emerged, with successful companies offering tools, training, consulting, certification, and other products and services. The economic engine behind the Agile movement as a whole is massive. ...

On the surface, it seems like design and Agile should magically work together, but there are some underlying philosophical issues you have to wrestle with before figuring it out. Design is all about big–picture thinking: planning, strategy, working out all the details, thinking everything through, making it perfect, etc. (Eric Karjaluoto called it the 'masterpiece mentality.') Agile, on the other hand, is more often about doing the basics and saving details for later: iteration, minimum viable products, 'perfect is the enemy of done,' etc. Those two worlds don't blend smoothly together, at least at first. Agile developers can get frustrated with designers for over–thinking things ('Why can't they just let it go? We can get to that later.'), while the designers get discouraged by the perceived low standards of Agile developers ('Don't you want it to be good? Don't you want the user to be happy?').

In both cases, though, the problem comes from a misunderstanding of each other's perspectives (as problems often do). The designer isn't being obsessive, they're just trying to do right by the user. And the developer isn't being lazy, they're just following a process that actually gets things done with minimal navel–gazing. Both sides could learn some important lessons from each other."

(James Archer, Forty)

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agile development • agile model • agile modelling • agile software development • current situationdesign processdevelopment life cycle • development methodology • Eric Karjaluoto • evolving needseXtreme Programmingfacing unpredicted challengesflexible management methodology • flexible process • formalised principlesiterative approachiterative design processiterative developmentiterative processjust-in-time (JIT)Kanban • Lean (methodology) • management methodology • over-thinking • perfect is the enemy of done • requirements documents • saving details for later • scrum software development processsoftware developmentsoftware development methoduser experience design • UX design • waterfall modelwhirlpool model

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JUNE 2014

Scrum: iterative and incremental agile software development

"Scrum is a management framework for incremental product development using one or more cross–functional, self–organizing teams of about seven people each. It provides a structure of roles, meetings, rules, and artifacts. Teams are responsible for creating and adapting their processes within this framework. Scrum uses fixed–length iterations, called Sprints, which are typically two weeks or 30 days long. Scrum teams attempt to build a potentially shippable (properly tested) product increment every iteration."

(Michael James)

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TAGS

agile developmentagile modellingapplication development • close online collaboration • cross-functional teams • development life cycleface-to-face communicationfacing unpredicted challengesflexible management methodology • holistic process • incremental development • incremental product development • iterative approachiterative design processiterative developmentiterative processjust-in-time (JIT)management methodology • Michael James • physical co-location • product development methodology • product development strategy • project managementproject management method • requirements churn • return on investment (ROI)scrum software development processself-organising teamssoftware development method • sprints • whirlpool model

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
12 FEBRUARY 2014

The process of reflecting critically on design through blogging

The following diagram provides a guide for structuring reflection on practice through blogging.

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2014blogging • blogging practice • critical reflection • critical reflective practice • design method • design thinking through blogging • diagramdocumenting design process • dsign process • iterative design process • reflecting critically • reflective analysisreflective journalreflective writingresearch by or through designSimon Perkinsweblog

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Jim Conallen: iterative web application design and development

"If you are looking for a cookie–cutter recipe to success, forget it. Developing applications is hard work and relies heavily on the skill and the ability of everyone involved. Even so, a strong process is important. Heroic efforts on the part of a development team can often bring a project to maturity; however, heroic efforts and strong process can do so repeatedly and reliably."

(Jim Conallen, 2002)

Jim Conallen (2002). "Building Web Applications with UML", (Addison–Wesley Object–Technology Series).

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2002 • application design • application developmentconceptual model • cookie-cutter • development life cyclediagramiterative design processiterative developmentiterative process • Jim Conallen • methods for design practicemodelling language • page based web applications • page-based web applications • Philippe Kruchten • requirements gathering • SDLC • software design • Software Development Life Cycle • software modellingUMLUnified Modelling Languageweb applicationweb application designweb application development

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Invention is the result of creative experimentation and synthesis

"Why waste time on expensive experiments when the right answer is obvious? The flaw in this thinking is that creativity is an iterative process in which you synthesize the final result from a variety of sources and thousands of potential solutions. It is not purely a deductive process with a single right answer.

When you fail to experiment broadly, you are building your solution from an anemic set of mental and technical resources. It is the equivalent of trying to design a bridge when the only material you've tested is paper. You can certainly build a bridge, but it will not be nearly as good compared to someone who experimented with a broad range of materials and construction techniques including steel or concrete."

(Daniel Cook, 16 August 2010)

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ild a bridge • conceptualisationconstruction techniquescreative processcreativity • design a bridge • design methoddesign process • experiment broadly • experimental enquiryexperimental investigation • experimental research • experimental techniquesexperimental thinkingexperimental workexperimentation • experiments • inventioniterative cycleiterative design processmethods for design practice • potential solutions • right answer • single right answer • synthesise knowledgetestingtheory building • variety of sources • visualising the creative process

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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