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Which clippings match 'Challenging Conventional Thinking' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 DECEMBER 2012

University students face a constant stream of questionnaires designed to assess the standard of their courses

"I'm more bothered by the underlying assumptions about what makes good university teaching that lie behind many of these surveys. You can see them particularly clearly in the National Student Survey, and the reams of student feedback it publishes online – explicitly, so it says, to help prospective students choose a good course, and to help universities 'enhance the student learning experience'. ...

OK, I can see how at first sight that might seem obvious. Who, after all, wants to see their kids go off to university, at great expense, for a diet of dis–satisfaction? But, from where I sit, dissatisfaction and discomfort have their own, important, role to play in a good university education. We're aiming to push our students to think differently, to move out of their intellectual comfort zone, to read and discuss texts that are almost too hard for them to manage. It is, and it's meant to be, destabilizing.

At the same time, we're urging them never to be satisfied with the arguments they are presented with, never to take things on trust, always to challenge, always to see the weak points, or to want to push the argument further. Then along comes the National Survey, treats them as consumers, and asks them if they're satisfied."

(Mary Beard, BBC News, 2 December 2012)

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2012anonymityassumptionsbureaucratic reductionchallenging conventional thinkingcomfort zoneconsumer culturecriticismcustomer satisfactiondepersonalising • destabilizing • discontent • dissatisfactionHigher Education Funding Council • honesty • Mary Beard • National Student Surveyperformativitypower without responsibilityquestionnaire • RateMyProfessor • satisfaction • satisfied consumers • satisfied students • student feedback • student learning experience • suggestions • surveysurvey form • survey-fatigue • surveysteaching • think differently • TripAdvisor • trusttrust and reliabilityundergraduateuniversityuniversity educationuniversity teaching • useful comments

CONTRIBUTOR

Phil Nodding
20 MAY 2011

The Fluxus Reader offers the first comprehensive overview on this challenging and controversial group

"Fluxus began in the 1950s as a loose, international community of artists, architects, composers and designers. By the 1960s, Fluxus has become a laboratory of ideas and an arena for artistic exprmentation in Europe, Asia and the United States. Described as 'the most radical and experimental art movement of the 1960s', Fluxus challenged conventional thinking on art and culture for over four decades. It had a central role in the birth of such key contemporary art forms as concept art, installation, performance art, intermedia and video. Despite this influence, the scope and scale of this unique phenomenon have made it difficult to explain Fluxus in normative historical and critical terms. The Fluxus Reader offers the first comprehensive overview on this challenging and controversial group. The Fluxus Reader is written by leading scholars and experts from Europe and the United States."

(Ken Friedman, Swinburne Research Bank)

Fig.1 Robert Watts (1965). 'TV Dinner' from the exhibition Art in Our Time: 1950 to the Present, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, September 5, 1999 to September 2, 2001.

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1950sarchitectsart and cultureart movement • artistic experimentation • artistic practiceartistsAsiaAustraliaavant-gardechallenging conventional thinking • composers • concept art • contemporary art forms • creative practicecritiquedesignersEuropeexperimentalFluxus • Fluxus Reader • installationintermediainternational communityjournal • laboratory of ideas • North Americaperformance artpre-prepared mealradical • Swinburne University • video art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2009

Barry Schwartz: The paradox of choice

"Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz's estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied."

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2005 • Barry Schwartz • challenging conventional thinkingchoiceconsumer choiceconsumer culture • cost of a choice • cost-benefit analysis • customer satisfactiondecision makingdissatisfaction • economic efficiency • expectationfreedom of choicehappinessindividual choiceindividual freedomindividualisminformation anxiety • microeconomic theory • opportunity costoverloadparadox • paralysis • Pareto efficiency • Pareto optimality • performativitypsychology • real cost • resource allocation • salad dressing • satisfaction • scarce resources • skip culture • TED Talksthe Daily Me • Vilfredo Pareto • Western societies • what I reckon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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